DVM
Seriate, Italy
DVM
Seriate, Italy

Time filter

Source Type

News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

-- Campbell Hall, NY - BBG&G Advertising has been recognized with four awards from the 14Annual Service Industry Advertising (SIA) Awards for their work in the Tourism and Service industries.Since 2003, the SIA Awards have recognized advertising excellence, specifically from service industry providers. The winners for 2016 were chosen from a pool of more than 1,900 entries, 600 advertising agencies and 800 institutions. Each was evaluated and selected by a national panel of judges based on execution, creativity, quality, consumer appeal and overall breakthrough advertising content."Winning this year's SIA Awards is a significant accomplishment and one that I am very proud of," says Deborah Garry, President & CEO of BBG&G Advertising. "I believe these awards are a testament to our outstanding creative work and strategic innovation that we consistently provide to all of our clients."BBG&G Advertising won two Gold Awards, one Silver Award and one Bronze Award. One of the gold awards was for a series of newspaper print ads for Flannery Animal Hospital, created to educate readers on the full range of service capabilities that Flannery has to offer, such as 24/7 Emergency Services, Dermatology, Feline Friendly Services, Laparoscopic, Weight Management, Physical Rehabilitation and more."We have been working with BBG&G for years and appreciate how they listen and transform our team's 'heart and soul' approach to our clients and patients," says Dr. Frank Puccio, DVM, of Flannery Animal Hospital. "Our clients are our family and we are a proud member of the BBG&G family."The silver and bronze awards were both for BBG&G's work with Ulster County Economic Development Alliance on the Ellenville Million marketing program, one for their overall integrated marketing campaign and one for Ellenville NY's new website, FindEllenville.com."Find Ellenville has been very beneficial to this community. The marketing program has provided exposure through multiple channels and helping local businesses gain awareness and store traffic. It is making a difference in this small town on various levels," said Rick Remsynder, Tourism Director, Ulster County Tourism. "The project put a historic gem full of diverse cuisine and endless outdoor opportunities back on the map with signature branding and a variety of traditional and digital marketing techniques."The other gold award was for Dutchess Tourism's Craft Beverage video, shot from the perspective of a visitor that Millennial and traditional audiences could identify with, and edited to be fast paced, visually alluring, and upbeat. The videohighlights the great wineries, breweries, and distilleries that Dutchess County has to offer, as well as provides an inside look as to how these craft beverages are made."Since before the Vassar Brothers established their brewery in 1801 and the illicit moonshine making operation of gangster Dutch Schultz in the early 20century, Dutchess County has been a place where the craft beverage makers have thrived, because of the richness of the land," said Dutchess Tourism President & CEO Mary Kay Vrba. "With our new Distinctly Dutchess Craft Beverage Trail, we have worked with BBG&G Advertising to leverage our history and expand the popularity of wine trails and unique offerings of new craft breweries, distilleries and our first cidery."Formed in 1997, BBG&G Advertising is a full-service marketing and public relations firm serving a broad range of industries, including tourism, healthcare and banking, in the greater Hudson Valley area. BBG&G is a Certified NY State WBE (women-owned business entity). For more information, call (845) 615-9084 or visit www.bbggadv.com


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A new analysis indicates that many cancer survivors change their prescription drug use (including skipping doses or requesting cheaper medications) for financial reasons. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study provides important information on the financial burden experienced by cancer survivors, suggesting non-elderly cancer survivors are particularly vulnerable to this phenomenon. Although research has shown that cancer drugs can represent considerable costs for cancer patients and their families, there is limited information about changes in prescription drug use for financial reasons among cancer survivors. To further investigate this, researchers from the American Cancer Society, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the National Institutes of Health used 2011-2014 data from the National Health Interview Survey, an annual household interview survey conducted by the CDC. This nationally representative survey included 8931 cancer survivors and 126,287 individuals without a cancer history. Among non-elderly adults, 31.6 percent of those who had been recently diagnosed and 27.9 percent of those who had been previously diagnosed (at least two years earlier) reported a change in prescription drug use for financial reasons, compared with 21.4 percent of adults without a history of cancer. "Specifically, non-elderly cancer survivors were more likely to skip medication, delay filling a prescription, ask their doctor for lower-cost medication, and use alternative therapies for financial reasons compared with non-elderly individuals without a cancer history," said the American Cancer Society's Ahmedin Jemal, DVM, PhD, a senior author of the paper. The study also showed that among privately insured non-elderly cancer survivors, one-third of survivors enrolled in high-deductible plans asked their doctor for lower-cost medications compared with less than one-fifth of survivors enrolled in low-deductible plans. Changes in prescription drug use for financial reasons were generally similar between elderly cancer survivors and elderly individuals without a cancer history. This is likely because of uniform healthcare coverage through Medicare. The findings may have significant policy implications. "Healthcare reforms addressing the financial burden of cancer among survivors, including the escalating cost of prescription drugs, should consider multiple comorbid conditions and high-deductible health plans, and the working poor," said Dr. Jemal. "Our findings also have implications for doctor and patient communication about the financial burden of cancer when making treatment decisions, especially on the use of certain drugs that cost hundreds of thousands of dollars but with very small benefit compared with alternative and more affordable drugs." In an accompanying editorial addressing the financial toxicity of cancer, Daniel Goldstein, MD, of the Rabin Medical Center in Israel and Emory University, stressed the need to avoid unnecessary testing and treatments. He added that "when two different treatments exist with equivalent efficacy and safety, the cheaper treatment should always be chosen." For more information or to obtain a PDF of any study, please contact: Dawn Peters (US) +1 781-388-8408 sciencenewsroom@wiley.com Follow us on Twitter @WileyNews Full Citation: "Do cancer survivors change their prescription drug use for financial reasons? Findings from a nationally representative sample in the United States." Zhiyuan Zheng, Xuesong Han, Gery P. Guy Jr., Amy J. Davidoff, Chunyu Li, Matthew P. Banegas, Donatus U. Ekwueme, K. Robin Yabroff, and Ahmedin Jemal. CANCER; Published Online: February 20, 2017 (DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30560). Author Contact: David Sampson, director of medical and scientific communications for the American Cancer Society's national home office, at david.sampson@cancer.org. Editorial: "Financial Toxicity in Cancer Care--Edging Toward Solutions." Daniel Goldstein. CANCER; Published Online: February 20, 2017 (DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30555). CANCER is a peer-reviewed publication of the American Cancer Society integrating scientific information from worldwide sources for all oncologic specialties. The objective of CANCER is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for the exchange of information among oncologic disciplines concerned with the etiology, course, and treatment of human cancer. CANCER is published on behalf of the American Cancer Society by Wiley and can be accessed online at http://wileyonlinelibrary. . Follow us on Twitter @JournalCancer and Facebook https:/ Wiley, a global company, helps people and organizations develop the skills and knowledge they need to succeed. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, combined with our digital learning, assessment and certification solutions help universities, learned societies, businesses, governments and individuals increase the academic and professional impact of their work. For more than 200 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The company's website can be accessed at http://www. .


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A combination of two cancer drugs inhibited both dengue and Ebola virus infections in mice in a study led by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers, despite the fact that these two viruses are vastly different from each other. In laboratory-dish experiments, the drug combination, which has previously shown efficacy against the hepatitis C virus, also was effective against West Nile and Zika viruses, both of which are relatives of the hepatitis C virus, and multiple other unrelated viruses. The multi-institution study, to be published online Feb. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, also pinpointed the specific molecular mechanism by which these drugs derail a variety of RNA viruses, whose genetic material consists not of DNA but of its close relative, RNA. "We've shown that a single combination of drugs can be effective across a broad range of viruses -- even when those viruses hail from widely separated branches of the evolutionary tree," said the study's senior author, Shirit Einav, MD, assistant professor of infectious diseases and of microbiology and immunology. The study's lead authors are former Stanford postdoctoral scholars Elena Bekerman, PhD, now at Gilead Sciences Inc., and Gregory Neveu, PhD, now at the University of Lyon and French National Institute of Health and Medical Research. The reason the drugs used in the study are able to combat infections by such different viruses is that their disabling action is directed not at the virus but at proteins of the host cell it's trying to infect, Einav said. Einav and her team are investigating strategies for combatting RNA viruses, such as dengue and Ebola. These viruses have a faulty replication process that results in frequent errors as their genetic material is copied, rendering them especially prone to mutations. Consequently, they swiftly acquire resistance to a typical antiviral drug that targets a specific viral enzyme, Einav said. "The 'one drug, one bug' approach can be quite successful, as in the case of hepatitis C virus," for which a concerted effort has generated several approved antiviral treatments, she said. But it took more than 10 years of research, she noted, and drug development costs typically exceed $2 billion. Making matters worse, Einav added, is the impossibility of predicting what the next emerging viral threat will look like. "We're always getting blindsided," she said. The deadly Ebola epidemic of a few years ago has subsided but could return at any time. Dengue infects an estimated 390 million people annually in over 100 countries. Four distinct strains of the dengue virus exist, hampering the development of a vaccine and boosting the chances of a once-infected person's re-infection by a different strain against which that person hasn't achieved sufficient immunity. Secondary infections can become life-threatening. While an Ebola vaccine has shown promise, it's not yet approved. A recently approved dengue vaccine has only limited efficacy. No viable antiviral drugs are currently available for either virus. Viruses are cut-rate brigands: They produce nothing on their own, but rather hijack the machinery of our cells. Hepatitis C, dengue, Ebola and other viruses hop onto molecular "buses" that whisk cargo between cell compartments. These buses shuttle the viruses around inside of cells. The buses' routes and fares are regulated by numerous cellular enzymes. Two such enzymes, which go by the acronyms AAK1 and GAK, essentially lower the fares charged by the molecular buses by tweaking them so they bind more strongly to their cargo. The standard antiviral approach aims to disable a specific viral enzyme. Einav and her associates' alternative approach took advantage of viruses' total dependence on infected cells' molecular machinery. The two-drug drug combination Einav's team put to work against dengue and Ebola impedes AAK1's and GAK's activity, effectively pricing bus fares beyond the viral budget. Erlotinib and sunitinib, each approved by the Food and Drug Administration more than a decade ago, are prescribed for various cancer indications. Neither AAK1 nor GAK are the primary targets of these drugs in their cancer-fighting roles. But Einav's group discovered, by accessing publicly available databases, that the two drugs impair AAK1 and GAK activity, too. Einav and her colleagues previously demonstrated that erlotinib and sunitinib inhibit hepatitis C virus infection in cells. In the new study, the investigators conducted experiments in lab dishes to show that both drugs inhibit viral infection by impeding the activity of AAK1 and GAK. Next, they tested the combination in lab dishes against the dengue and Ebola viruses, and observed that viral activity was strongly inhibited in both. While the dengue virus is a relatively close cousin of hepatitis C, it is quite different from the Ebola virus. The same drug combination also showed efficacy against a variety of other RNA viruses related to hepatitis C, including the Zika and West Nile viruses, and even against several unrelated viruses. In a prevention experiment in mice, the investigators administered the erlotinib-sunitinib combination once daily starting on the day of dengue-virus infection, employing the two drugs for five days at doses comparable to those approved for use against cancer in humans. All the control mice died between days four and eight. But of those treated with the drug combination, 65 to 100 percent, depending on the individual experiment, survived and regained their pre-infection weight and mobility. Given individually, the drugs provided substantially less protection, Einav said. In another experiment designed to test the drugs as a therapy, the combination retained substantial antiviral efficacy as long as it was given less than 48 hours after infection. In a similar prevention experiment with the Ebola virus, the scientists administered the drug daily for 10 days starting at six hours before infection. Some 90 percent of the control mice died within a week or two. But half the mice receiving the drug combination survived. Again, the drugs were substantially less effective when given individually. Additional lab experiments showed that the combination profoundly inhibited the dengue virus's ability to develop drug resistance. There's no possible way for viral mutations to alter the proteins of the cells it infects, Einav said, and no easy way for the virus to mutate around its dependence on those proteins. Stanford's Office of Technology Licensing has filed for patents on intellectual property associated with the findings. Other Stanford study co-authors are Claude Nagamine, DVM, PhD, assistant professor of comparative medicine; and research scientist Robert Mateo, PhD. The study was carried out in collaboration with researchers from the University of Chicago, the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases in Maryland, the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Leuven in Belgium. The study was funded by the National Institute of Health (grants IU19AI10966201 and U19A1083019); the American Cancer Society; the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation; the Department of Defense; Stanford Bio-X; the Stanford Spark program; the Stanford Translational Research and Applied Medicine program; Spectrum, which administers Stanford's Clinical and Translational Science Award (grant UL1TR001085) from the NIH; the Stanford Child Health Research Institute; and the Taiwan Ministry of Science and Technology. Stanford's departments of Medicine and of Microbiology and Immunology also supported the work. The Stanford University School of Medicine consistently ranks among the nation's top medical schools, integrating research, medical education, patient care and community service. For more news about the school, please visit http://med. . The medical school is part of Stanford Medicine, which includes Stanford Health Care and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford. For information about all three, please visit http://med. .


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

YONKERS, N.Y.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--In a promising development for pet cancer patients in the Northeast, Animal Specialty Center (ASC) introduced its new TrueBeam™ Radiotherapy system to leading veterinary professionals with a formal ribbon cutting ceremony. The ribbon cutting for the TrueBeam system was part of a continuing education seminar that included a presentation entitled, “Combining Surgery and Radiation” by ASC’s Kendra Hearon, DVM, DACVS, Fellow in Surgical Oncology. “We are very excited to introduce this new technology to veterinary professionals because is it a real game-changer that will enable us to treat even the most challenging cases with unprecedented speed and pinpoint precision,” said Kari Rosen, DVM, DACVR RO at ASC. “With a broad spectrum of new capabilities, TrueBeam breaks the mold in just about every dimension, making it possible for us to offer faster, more targeted treatments to tumors even as they move and change over time.” “VCA is on the forefront of cancer treatment using the most sophisticated technology available to fight cancer,” said Karen Oberthaler, VMD, DACVIM Medical Oncology. “It’s vitally important for our profession to learn about new modalities and how they can be combined for maximum effectiveness, especially since there is very little in veterinary literature about this, despite its increasing frequency. This is a breakthrough that lets us bring a wider spectrum of advanced radiotherapy treatment options to many more patients.” More than 60 veterinarians and veterinary technicians were in attendance for the seminar, which was followed by a lively Q&A session. Among those participating in the ribbon cutting ceremony were Drs. Rosen, Hearon and Oberthaler from ASC, along with 40 industry colleagues. Located in Yonkers, New York, Animal Specialty Center is a full-service hospital staffed with leading board certified veterinary specialists, emergency doctors and a highly skilled support staff. The center offers 24/7 emergency care; critical care; internal medicine; neurology; medical oncology; radiation oncology; dentistry; cardiology; rehabilitation; and surgery and acupuncture. Our facility serves pet owners and their pets from Westchester and Rockland Counties, Connecticut, Manhattan and the Bronx. Clients from around the world have traveled to the hospital for consultations with highly skilled veterinary specialists, as well as our advanced, cutting edge diagnostic equipment and therapeutic procedures. The center provides an unparalleled level of comprehensive, specialized care with a team approach working closely with pet owners and family veterinarians from diagnosis through after care. VCA Animal Hospitals operates more than 650 small animal veterinary hospitals in the U.S. and Canada. The hospitals are staffed by more than 4,500 fully qualified, dedicated and compassionate veterinarians to give pets the very best in medical care, of which over 500 are board-certified specialists who are experts in areas such as Oncology, Cardiology, Emergency & Critical Care, and Surgery for animals. VCA Animal Hospitals provides a full range of general practice services to keep pets well and specialized treatments when pets are ill. For more information, please visit www.VCAhospitals.com or follow on Twitter @vcapethealth.


News Article | February 12, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

CASTLE ROCK, Colo., Feb. 12, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- February is National Pet Dental Health Month. It's a time when animal hospitals, including Brekke Veterinary Clinic, emphasize how pet owners can improve pet health and comfort through dental exams and regular tooth brushing. Dr. Jay Brekke at Brekke Veterinary Clinic conducts pet dental exams, cleans plaque from teeth, and performs extractions when teeth are fractured or infected. To raise awareness for pet dental care Brekke Veterinary Clinic is offering $25 off any dental procedure during February! Brekke Veterinary Clinic also teaches owners one of the most effective methods for minimizing pet dental disease -- tooth brushing. Castle Rock veterinarian, Dr. Jay Brekke, DVM, says owners can protect pets against dental problems by learning how to gently brush their teeth once a day or at least once a week. To train your pet to be comfortable with a pet-size toothbrush, Dr. Brekke says, "Start by gently sliding one of your fingers up and down on your pet's teeth. After doing this daily for about a week, switch to a toothbrush and specially formulated toothpaste with a flavor your pet may enjoy, such as beef or seafood." Dr. Brekke also discusses the benefits of pet dental chews. Pets love brushing their teeth daily when it’s a treat! Signs of periodontal (gum) disease in pets include bad breath, bleeding gums, stained teeth and gums, swollen gums, damage such as chipping and cracking, and chewing problems that can result in an unwillingness to eat. The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) notes that 70 percent of cats and 80 percent of dogs have periodontal disease by the time they are three years old, and that when considering pet products claiming they are helpful for dental health, such as treats or special diets, it's best to consult with veterinarian Dr. Brekke. "We're always willing to provide information helping customers to make the best choices for their pets," Dr. Brekke says. Mouth bacteria mixed with mucus and other particles leads to periodontal disease when it creates sticky, colorless plaque covering teeth. This substance hardens into tartar and reaches below the gum line creating pockets of bacteria that may harm internal organs as well as gums, teeth, and bone. To minimize stress to pets and to perform dentistry safely and efficiently, veterinarians need to anesthetize patients during teeth cleaning and other dental procedures. Brekke Veterinary Clinic provides comprehensive medical services for pets, including emergency surgery. Treatment of hunting dogs is one of its specialties. Regular business hours for Monday, Wednesday and Friday are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, the clinic is open an hour longer from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. After-hours emergency services and consulting are available Monday through Friday until midnight. Additional information is available on their website at http://brekkevet.com/.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A collaborative study describes a novel myoclonic epilepsy syndrome in dogs for the first time and discovers its genetic cause at DIRAS1 gene. The affected dogs developed myoclonic seizures at young age - on average 6 months old - and seizures occur typically at rest. In some of the dogs the seizures could be triggered by light. The canine myoclonic epilepsy resembles human juvenile myoclonic syndrome in many aspects and the study has therefore meaningful implications for epilepsy research across species, says Professor Hannes Lohi from the canine gene research group, University of Helsinki. Myoclonic epilepsies are one of the most common forms of epilepsy in human and the canine findings will not only help in diagnostics but also provide a novel entry point to understand the pathophysiology of the disease. The identified DIRAS1 gene may play a role in cholinergic transmission in the brain and provides a novel target for the development of epilepsy treatments. We found a novel epilepsy gene, DIRAS1, which has not been linked to any neurological diseases before. The gene is poorly characterized so far, but some studies suggest that it may play a role in cholinergic neurotransmission, which could be a highly relevant pathway for the myoclonic epilepsies, explains MSc Sarviaho, co-first author of the study. The genetic backgrounds of myoclonic epilepsies are not well known yet, and our study provides a new candidate gene, which helps to further characterize the underlying pathophysiology in future studies. This would be important for the development of new treatment scenarios, summarizes Professor Lohi, senior author of the study. The affected dogs continue to serve as preclinical models when new treatment options are sought in ongoing studies. The results have implications for both veterinary diagnostics and breeding programs. We screened over 600 Rhodesian Ridgebacks and about 1000 epileptic dogs in other breeds and found that the DIRAS1 defect was specific for juvenile myoclonic epilepsy in Rhodesian Ridgebacks so far, says MSc Sarviaho. With the help of the genetic test, veterinarians can diagnose this specific epilepsy in their canine patients while breeders will be able to identify carriers and revise the breeding plans to avoid future affected puppies. About 15% of the dogs in the breed carry the DIRAS1 mutation and dogs all over Europe and beyond are affected, says DVM Franziska Wieländer from LMU Munich. To characterize the clinical features, researchers utilized a novel wireless video-EEG recording method. This allows a real-time monitoring of the electrical events prior, during and after the seizure episode in unsedated dogs. All the wires from electrodes are attached to a small portable device on the dog's back that transmits the data straight to our computers. Thus, the dog is free to move around and we can record the EEG for long periods at one go, explains Professor Fiona James. She has been previously developing the method at the University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Video-EEG is a routine approach in the human epilepsy clinic but only piloted now for the dogs. The beauty of the method is that we can easily correlate the behavioral changes with the recorded electroencephalographs and compare them to human EEG results. Indeed, with this technique we were able to identify epilepsy at an early stage and prior to the development of generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Moreover, we found strikingly similar EEG patterns in dogs that have been described in human myoclonic epilepsy", describes Professor Andrea Fischer from LMU Munich. Video-EEG is a powerful new approach for veterinary epilepsy research compared to previous short, 20-minute interictal measurements under sedation and gives much more accurate results, says Wieländer. Careful clinical studies helped to establish proper study cohorts to identify the genetic cause. The study was published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA (PNAS) on 20 February 2017.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Rescued dogs and cats who come to the nation’s largest companion animal sanctuary for a second chance at a happy life often show up with serious dental issues. With the help some of the leading skilled veterinarians in animal dentistry, several of these animals arecently had their health and adoptability improved. A group of veterinarians led by board-certified veterinary dental specialist Dr. Brook A. Niemiec, DVM of Veterinary Dental Specialties & Oral Surgery extracted 569 teeth, performed 3 root canals, along with various other dental procedures on the 38 animals they treated. "This is the third time Dr. Brook Niemiec and his intrepid team of dental experts have generously donated their time to helping the dogs and cats at the Sanctuary run by Best Friends Animal Society. There is no way to exaggerate how important this dental care is both for the animals and the medical team at Best Friends. So many of our animals come in with extreme dental issues and it directly impacts their overall health and mental attitude. When Dr. Brook and his team lend their talents and their hearts this way, we can get many dental procedures done in a very short time -- it frees up our medical team to attend to other medical issues for the animals at the sanctuary, and it is a huge boost in getting our sanctuary dogs and cats ready for adoption." Konecny said. “To me, one of the most exciting recent veterinary medical developments is that untreated dental disease is now truly considered an animal welfare issue,” Niemiec said. “Untreated dental disease negatively affects quality of life. So we look forward to our visits to Best Friends where we can help rescued dogs and cats.” Dr. Niemiec is Chair of the World Small Animal Veterinary Medical Association (WSAVA) Dental Standardization Project.    He and his committee members from North and South America, Australia/Oceania, Europe, and Africa are creating international guidelines to promote veterinary dentistry worldwide. The guidelines will be released later in 2017 and importantly, take into account the different socio-economic realities worldwide so that the standards are obtainable goals. The WSAVA is comprised of more than 100 veterinary associations worldwide. In addition to helping the dogs and cats at Best Friends’ sanctuary, as well as local shelter animals in southern California, Veterinary Dental Specialties & Oral Surgery has started a “Pet’s Tooth Fairy Fund”® to help pets whose owners cannot afford advanced dental treatment. For more information, please contact Info(at)scvds(dot)com. The team who helped at Best Friends Animal Society’s sanctuary were: About Best Friends Animal Society® Best Friends Animal Society is the only national animal welfare organization dedicated exclusively to ending the killing of dogs and cats in America's shelters. A leader in the no-kill movement, Best Friends runs the nation's largest no-kill sanctuary for companion animals, adoption centers and spay and neuter facilities in Los Angeles and Salt Lake City as well as lifesaving programs in Atlanta and New York City along with partnership with more than 1,600 rescue groups and shelters across the country. Since its founding in 1984, Best Friends has helped reduce the number of animals killed in American shelters from 17 million per year to an estimated 4 million. By continuing to build effective initiatives that reduce the number of animals entering shelters and increase the number who find homes, Best Friends and its nationwide network of members and partners are working to Save Them All®. To become a fan of Best Friends Animal Society on Facebook go to: http://www.facebook.com/bestfriendsanimalsociety


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

TOPEKA, Kan., Feb. 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Animal Clinic of North Topeka, P. A. today announced its support of National Pet Dental Health Month. This special month is sponsored by the AVMA (American Veterinary Medical Association), a non-profit veterinary organization, and is meant to raise awareness of the need for dental care in companion animals. Animal Clinic of North Topeka recognizes that dental care is needed to prevent pain and debilitation in pets and offers a full array of services to keep the animals' mouths healthy and free of problems. Just as with humans, dogs and cats can develop a full array of dental problems if care is not taken to prevent them. These include cavities, cracking and breaking of teeth, periodontal disease, and more. Even so, many people still think that animals don't need dental care. National Pet Dental Health Month was created to help dispel this myth and improve care among the pet population. "It's a common misconception that dogs and cats have teeth that take care of themselves. Domestic pets are in very different conditions than their wild counterparts. This is good for the animals in most ways – it provides a steady food supply, protection from predators, and treatment for disease – but it does have a couple of drawbacks. One of the drawbacks is that commercial pet food does not adequately remove tartar from the teeth," explained Dr. Bryan Stancliffe, DVM. Several measures are recommended for preserving the health of the teeth of dogs and cats. The first is the same as for humans: brushing the teeth. Since pets can't brush their own, owners should attempt to do it for them. If started young, the majority of pets will learn to tolerate this on a daily basis. Older animals, however, may refuse to go along with the procedure. For them, special tartar-fighting treats are available. Though these aren't quite as effective as a toothbrush, they are better than providing nothing at all. The next step is the dental cleaning. In pets, this requires general anesthesia, so it is done on an as-needed basis. A veterinarian will let the pet owner know when this is recommended. Professional cleanings are essential for preventing periodontal disease. If larger problems have arisen, tooth extraction may be needed. This is typically done instead of root canal treatment. It is also required if a tooth has cracked, broken, or otherwise developed problems that would cause pain to the pet. Animal Clinic of North Topeka, P. A. offers teeth cleaning and extractions for pets. They also offer a full array of other veterinary services, parasite prevention, emergency appointments, boarding, and grooming. For more information on their services and hours, visit their website at http://animalclinicoftopeka.com/.


PHOENIX--(BUSINESS WIRE)--This past weekend, North Americans opened their hearts and their homes to more than 24,000 adoptable pets who were looking for their forever families during PetSmart Charities’ first National Adoption Weekend of 2017—hosted at over 1,500 PetSmart stores across the continent. This weekend event ranks among the top most successful adoption events for the leading pet specialty retailer and the leading funder of animal welfare. “We are thrilled by the continued success of our National Adoption Weekend event where 24,428 pets’ lives were saved,” said Eran Cohen, chief customer experience officer at PetSmart. “Through this powerful effort between PetSmart Charities, PetSmart stores, our associates and thousands of adoption partners from coast to coast, we continue our commitment to helping pets find their forever homes and to serve as a trusted partner to new pet parents everywhere.” Four times each year, PetSmart teams up with PetSmart Charities and more than 3,000 animal welfare organizations on National Adoption Weekends to bring adoptable pets into PetSmart stores to find them the forever homes they deserve. While often referred to as National Adoption “Weekend,” the adoption efforts span the entire week with the majority of the pets – 23,000 on average – adopted between Friday and Sunday. PetSmart, The Adopt Spot, has helped to facilitate over 7.3 million adoptions to date, more than any other brick-and-mortar organization. For every 30 seconds a PetSmart store is open, a pet is adopted, totaling 1,400 pets' lives saved every day. “We are excited to report the success of our first National Adoption Weekend event of the New Year to kick off our lifesaving efforts in 2017,” said David Haworth, DVM, Ph.D., president of PetSmart Charities. “Pet adoption continues to be key to our mission to end pet homelessness and connect people and pets across the United States and Canada. We look forward to saving even more lives as the year progresses.” Did You Adopt This Weekend? New pet parents who wish to share their heartwarming adoption stories and photos with their new four-legged family member are encouraged to use the hashtag #iadopted on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. The next PetSmart Charities National Adoption Weekend will be held on May 5-7, 2017. As a gift to those who saved a life through adoption, no matter where they choose to adopt their pet, PetSmart offers a free Adoption Kit* that provides useful content on how to integrate a pet into the family while offering true value – more than $450 in savings. Included are coupons for a free bag of dog or cat food from Simply Nourish™, Authority® or Good Natured™, a free veterinarian visit, a complimentary private training session with an accredited trainer, a free Doggie Day Camp session and a free overnight boarding stay, as well as half off on a grooming service. Also included are savings on all the essentials for a new pet, including beds, crates, gates, brushes, feeding bowls, collars, leashes, toys and treats, as well as solutions like pet calming products and stain and odor remedies for any mishaps that may occur. PetSmart, Inc. is the largest specialty pet retailer of services and solutions for the lifetime needs of pets. At PetSmart, we love pets, and we believe pets make us better people. Every day with every connection, PetSmart’s passionate associates help bring pet parents closer to their pets so they can live more fulfilled lives. This vision impacts everything we do for our customers, the way we support our associates and how we give back to our communities. We employ approximately 53,000 associates, operate 1,500 pet stores in the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico and 203 in-store PetSmart® PetsHotel® dog and cat boarding facilities. PetSmart provides a broad range of competitively priced pet food and pet products and offers dog training, pet grooming, pet boarding, PetSmart Doggie Day Camp day care services and pet adoption services in-store. Our portfolio of digital resources for pet parents – including PetSmart.com, PetFoodDirect.com, Pet360.com and petMD.com – offers the most comprehensive online pet supplies and pet care information in the U.S. Through our in-store pet adoption partnership with independent nonprofit organizations, PetSmart Charities® and PetSmart Charities™ of Canada, PetSmart helps to save the lives of more than 500,000 homeless pets each year. The Adopt Spot is a trademark of PetSmart, Inc. Follow PetSmart on Twitter: @PetSmart Find PetSmart on Facebook: www.facebook.com/PetSmart See PetSmart on YouTube: www.YouTube.com/PetSmart PetSmart Charities, Inc. is a nonprofit animal welfare organization that saves the lives of homeless pets. Each year nearly 500,000 dogs and cats find homes through our adoption program in all PetSmart® stores across the U.S. and sponsored adoption events. Each year millions of PetSmart shoppers contribute to pets in need by making donations directly to PetSmart Charities on a pin pad at the registers in PetSmart stores. PetSmart Charities administers and efficiently uses 90 cents of every dollar of the generous donations by issuing grants and providing additional support to help pets in need. PetSmart Charities grants more money to directly help pets in need than any other animal welfare group in North America, with a focus on funding adoption and spay/neuter programs that help communities solve pet overpopulation. PetSmart Charities is a 501(c)(3) organization, independent from PetSmart, Inc. PetSmart Charities has received the Four Star Rating for the past 13 years from Charity Navigator, an independent nonprofit that reports on the effectiveness, accountability and transparency of nonprofits, placing it among the top one percent of charities rated by this organization. PetSmart Charities of Canada is a nonprofit animal welfare organization that saves the lives of homeless pets in Canada. Each year more than 25,000 pets find Canadian homes through our adoption program in nearly all PetSmart stores across Canada and our sponsored adoption events. A leading funder of animal welfare, PetSmart Charities of Canada has granted more than $10 million to help pets in need with a funding focus on adoption and spay/neuter programs that help communities solve pet overpopulation and emergency relief grants that help pets and pet parents impacted by natural and man-made disasters. PetSmart Charities of Canada is a registered Canadian charity, independent from PetSmart.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

DENVER--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Petco Foundation and the Blue Buffalo Foundation have partnered to sponsor a $1 million grant for Morris Animal Foundation to help fund the Foundation’s research initiative in osteosarcoma, the most common bone cancer in dogs. “Morris Animal Foundation continues to invest in groundbreaking osteosarcoma research, and we are deeply appreciative of the Petco Foundation and the Blue Buffalo Foundation for their support of this important work,” said John Reddington, DVM, PhD, President and CEO of Morris Animal Foundation. “This grant will help in our efforts to develop interventions to improve quality of life and survival time for our canine companions with this devastating disease.” While safe and effective treatment options currently are available to treat the primary cancer, better treatments are needed to stop metastasis. The new grant will help fund innovative approaches to combat metastatic osteosarcoma. Recently funded studies at Morris Animal Foundation have zeroed in on ways to optimize chemotherapy selection, control pain, and find new therapeutic targets, all aimed at improving treatment outcomes. “The Petco Foundation, established in 1999, is focused on creating a better world for animals,” said Susanne Kogut, Executive Director of the Petco Foundation. “Osteosarcoma research holds the promise of improving treatment for dogs with this disease, giving them healthier lives and more time with the families that love them.” The Blue Buffalo Foundation was established in 2003 with a specific focus on cancer research. “So many of us have lost beloved pets to this deadly disease, and we are committed to advancing science that will make a difference in the fight against pet cancer,” said David Petrie, President of the Blue Buffalo Foundation. “We are pleased to partner with Morris Animal Foundation to fund innovative studies that will not only help our companion animals survive cancer, but thrive and have good lives.” The Petco Foundation and Blue Buffalo Foundation’s eighth annual Pet Cancer Awareness fundraising campaign takes place May 6 – May 28, 2017. Animal lovers and pet parents nationwide can help continue this important work by donating at any Petco store or at www.petco.com/pca. A portion of the funds will be donated to Morris Animal Foundation for ongoing research in osteosarcoma. Morris Animal Foundation is a global leader in funding scientific studies that advance the health of companion animals, horses and wildlife. Since its founding in 1948, the Foundation has invested over $113 million toward more than 2,500 studies that have led to significant breakthroughs in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of diseases to benefit animals worldwide. Learn more at Morris Animal Foundation. The Blue Buffalo Foundation (“Foundation”) was established in 2003 by the founders of Blue Buffalo Company, Ltd. (“Blue Buffalo”) a manufacturer of natural dog and cat foods under the BLUE™ brand names. Helping to find a cure for pet cancer is a top priority for Blue Buffalo because its founders have had very personal experience with this disease. “Our dog Blue, a large breed Airedale and a great pal, had three bouts with cancer,” said Bill Bishop, Blue Buffalo’s founder. “After Blue’s battles, we wanted to do something meaningful to help find a cure for this devastating disease. So one of the first things we did after starting our pet food company was to establish the Foundation to raise money for pet cancer research, and raise awareness among pet parents of the early warning signs of this disease.” www.PetCancerAwareness.org. At the Petco Foundation, we believe that every animal deserves to live its best life. Since 1999, we’ve invested more than $175 million in lifesaving animal welfare work to make that happen. With our more than 4,000 animal welfare partners, we inspire and empower communities to make a difference by investing in adoption and medical care programs, spay and neuter services, pet cancer research, service and therapy animals, and numerous other lifesaving initiatives. Through our Think Adoption First program, we partner with Petco stores and animal welfare organizations across the country to increase pet adoptions. So far, we’ve helped more than 5 million pets find their new loving families, and we’re just getting started. Visit petcofoundation.org to learn more about how you can get involved.

Loading DVM collaborators
Loading DVM collaborators