Berlin, NJ, United States
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Borisjuk N.,Duckweed USA | Borisjuk N.,University of Adelaide | Chu P.,Duckweed USA | Chu P.,University of Adelaide | And 8 more authors.
Plant Biology | Year: 2015

Lemnaceae, commonly called duckweeds, comprise a diverse group of floating aquatic plants that have previously been classified into 37 species based on morphological and physiological criteria. In addition to their unique evolutionary position among angiosperms and their applications in biomonitoring, the potential of duckweeds as a novel sustainable crop for fuel and feed has recently increased interest in the study of their biodiversity and systematics. However, due to their small size and abbreviated structure, accurate typing of duckweeds based on morphology can be challenging. In the past decade, attempts to employ molecular barcoding techniques for species assignment have produced promising results; however, they have yet to be codified into a simple and quantitative protocol. A study that compiles and compares the barcode sequences within all known species of this family would help to establish the fidelity and limits of this DNA-based approach. In this work, we compared the level of conservation between over 100 strains of duckweed for two intergenic barcode sequences derived from the plastid genome. By using over 300 sequences publicly available in the NCBI database, we determined the utility of each of these two barcodes for duckweed species identification. Through sequencing of these barcodes from additional accessions, 30 of the 37 known species of duckweed could be identified with varying levels of confidence using this approach. From our analyses using this reference dataset, we also confirmed two instances where mis-assignment of species has likely occurred. Potential strategies for further improving the scope of this technology are discussed. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.


Sree K.S.,Amity University | Adelmann K.,Friedrich - Schiller University of Jena | Garcia C.,Duckweed USA | Lam E.,Duckweed USA | Appenroth K.-J.,Friedrich - Schiller University of Jena
Planta | Year: 2015

Main conclusion: Ten of 34 tested duckweed clones showed relatively higher salt tolerance. Salinity stress induced high level of starch accumulation in these clones, making them potential feedstock candidates for biofuel production. Duckweeds are promising as a new generation of crop plants that requires minimal input while providing fast biomass production. Two important traits of interest that can impact on the economic viability of this system are their sensitivity to salt and the starch content of the harvested duckweed. We have surveyed 33 strains of duckweed selected from across all 5 genera and amongst 13 species to quantify the natural variance of these traits. We found that there are large ranges of intraspecific variations in salt tolerance, while all species examined accumulated more starch in response to the initial stages of salt stress. However, the magnitude of the change in starch content varied widely between strains. Our results suggest that specific duckweed clones can be cultivated under relatively saline conditions, while increasing salt in the medium before harvesting could be used to increase starch in duckweed biomass for bioethanol production. © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Duckweed USA | Entity website

Sparta Georgia Waste Water Treatment Facility Throughout the South and in remote locations across the United States. many towns use settling ponds or lagoons to collect municipal sewage as part of their waste water treatment process ...


Duckweed USA | Entity website

AURORA SYNFUEL GREENHOUSES


Duckweed USA | Entity website

Press Releases Duckweed USA Creating Clean Fuels for Less Than $1 per Gallon BERLIN, N.J ...


Duckweed USA | Entity website

WE'RE SOCIAL Copyright 2014, Duckweed USA


Duckweed USA | Entity website

AURORA DEMONSTRATION FACILITY


PubMed | Duckweed USA
Type: | Journal: Plant biology (Stuttgart, Germany) | Year: 2015

Lemnaceae, commonly called duckweeds, comprise a diverse group of floating aquatic plants that have previously been classified into 37 species based on morphological and physiological criteria. In addition to their unique evolutionary position among angiosperms and their applications in biomonitoring, the potential of duckweeds as a novel sustainable crop for fuel and feed has recently increased interest in the study of their biodiversity and systematics. However, due to their small size and abbreviated structure, accurate typing of duckweeds based on morphology can be challenging. In the past decade, attempts to employ molecular barcoding techniques for species assignment have produced promising results; however, they have yet to be codified into a simple and quantitative protocol. A study that compiles and compares the barcode sequences within all known species of this family would help to establish the fidelity and limits of this DNA-based approach. In this work, we compared the level of conservation between over 100 strains of duckweed for two intergenic barcode sequences derived from the plastid genome. By using over 300 sequences publicly available in the NCBI database, we determined the utility of each of these two barcodes for duckweed species identification. Through sequencing of these barcodes from additional accessions, 30 of the 37 known species of duckweed could be identified with varying levels of confidence using this approach. From our analyses using this reference dataset, we also confirmed two instances where mis-assignment of species has likely occurred. Potential strategies for further improving the scope of this technology are discussed.


Duckweed USA | Entity website

By growing and harvesting algae in small hexagon-shaped greenhouses, we can produce over 300,000 gallons of clean synfuel per acre annually. That's enough oil to heat 400 average northern homes per year! By collecting and harvesting the waste biomass in waste water treatment settling ponds, we can produce over 300,000 gallons of clean synfuel per acre annually ...

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