DRC Consulting Ltd.

Town and Country, WA, United States

DRC Consulting Ltd.

Town and Country, WA, United States
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Crow D.R.,DRC Consulting Ltd | Liggett D.P.,DuPont Company | Scott M.A.,Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
IEEE IAS Electrical Safety Workshop | Year: 2017

Electrical safety-Where were we yesterday? Where are we today? Where will we be in the future? The safety culture is continuing to evolve to provide a safer work environment for people working around electrical equipment. To improve electrical safety, it takes commitment to continuous improvement of the electrical safety culture. New thoughts and ideas to improve electrical safety are critical. This paper addresses how work practices have changed over time and recommends ideas to upgrade the existing electrical culture. To change the existing safety culture new ideas need to be developed to cause higher performance in electrical safety for all people exposed to electrical hazards. © 2017 IEEE.


Crow D.R.,DRC Consulting Ltd | Liggett D.P.,DuPont Company | Scott M.A.,Environmental Health &amp
IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications | Year: 2017

This paper examines what it takes to improve the electrical safety culture in an organization. First, the components of a culture are examined, and how any culture comes to be the norm is reviewed. Second, examples are given on how culture has already changed significantly by contrasting past and present work practices in electrical safety. Third, suggestions for concrete ways to make future improvements in electrical safety cultures are provided. IEEE


Crow D.R.,DRC Consulting Ltd. | Liggett D.P.,DuPont Company
Record of Conference Papers - Annual Petroleum and Chemical Industry Conference | Year: 2012

For more than 50 years research has shown that a correlation exists between the number of incidents, injuries, and fatalities. Investigation into electrical incidents indicates there is more to understand about the causal effect of the number of incidents occurring. Many electrical incidents are caused by undesirable actions of people. These are called unsafe acts. Why do people perform unsafe acts Lack of experience, knowledge, or skills often come into play. What people believe about safety is another important component. The intent of this paper is to explore these relationships and to focus on unsafe behaviors and beliefs about safety. By investigating and using the actions outlined in this paper fewer incidents will occur resulting in a decrease in injuries and fatalities. © 2012 IEEE.


Crow D.R.,DRC Consulting Ltd. | Aeiker J.D.,United Mobile
IEEE IAS Electrical Safety Workshop | Year: 2013

Auditing is a critical element of an electrical safety program. It is the verification of what is working and what is not working within company policies, procedures, and programs. It identifies gaps in a company's standards, programs and work practices that do not meet the local or federal regulations or industry consensus standards, such as NFPA 70E and/or CSA Z462 that apply to the facility. There are three basic types of audits: internal, external and regulatory. This paper will focus on the major elements of an audit which include: 1) pre-audit activities, involving selection of auditors, and scope of audits, 2) on-site audit activities including protocols and criteria involved, and 3) post-audit activities outlining findings and recommendations for improvement. Auditing is important to the electrical safety program because the focus is on continuous improvement in safety. It also verifies that the policies, procedures and work practices of the company are technologically sound, abreast of the regulations, and include the best practices of the industry. © 2013 IEEE.


Jamil S.,Imperial Oil | Aeiker J.D.,DuPont Company | Crow D.R.,DRC Consulting Ltd.
IEEE Industry Applications Magazine | Year: 2010

This article discusses the incorporation of auditing as a key element in an electrical safety management program. What is the purpose of auditing? Auditing provides the means to understand performance versus established standards and identify areas for continued improvement. To have an effective electrical safety program, an auditing process must be an integral element of the electrical safety program. There are many types of audits, and an effective audit program uses several audits to ensure that all appropriate aspects of an electrical safety management program are effectively working. Some address conformance with local and federal regulations, whereas others address conformance to corporate or facility standards. The main element of an electrical safety audit should address the principles, controls, procedures, and other requirements that an employer has in place and also address the missing items that are requirements in National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 70E and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). How audits are performed and used determines credibility and acceptance of the audit program. Different types of audit practices provide the opportunity to emphasize different aspects of the management program. Using a detailed criteria and protocol ensures completeness of the audit. © 2006 IEEE.


Crow D.R.,DRC Consulting Ltd. | Liggett D.P.,DuPont Company
IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications | Year: 2014

Electrical safety incidents and injuries can be the result of inappropriate work behavior or what is referred to as "unsafe acts." These occur although training and education have been provided on electrical hazards and their possible consequences. Providing training to people is not enough to motivate them to follow the procedures. When unsupervised, those people who are aware of the hazards may still believe that they are qualified to take risks because previous "unsafe acts" have not resulted in an incident. This paper will provide information on what motivates people to intrinsically follow proper electrical safety procedures. By understanding these principles, human performance can be positively changed, and the electrical work practices of personnel can be improved to consistently follow safe work procedures. © 1972-2012 IEEE.


Satish C.,10 5 3 2 6 Masab Tank | Crow D.R.,DRC Consulting Ltd.
IEEE IAS Electrical Safety Workshop | Year: 2014

The performance of electrical systems depends on, among other things, the type and quality of maintenance and the safe operation of the equipment. It is necessary to evaluate the quality of the maintenance and safety procedures utilized within the safe work practice program. The paper advises the use of external auditing of electrical systems and maintenance programs for the advantages it brings to the company. The paper also explores the concept of a possible mandatory certification of 'conformance to safe standards' by a neutral party. Various standards, recommended practices and statutory codes used in different countries are listed in this paper. The paper critically examines these publications and possible shortcomings. Development of a globally valid standard for electrical safety which integrates the best of the various standards is hypothesized and championed here. The paper recommends combining the various electrical standards into a holistic version of a global electrical safety standard for use in your maintenance and electrical safe work practice policies and procedures. © 2014 IEEE.


Crow D.R.,DRC Consulting Ltd. | Becker T.,ESPS Electrical Safety Program Solutions Inc.
IEEE Industry Applications Magazine | Year: 2014

The purpose of this article is to cover the process for the development, implementation, and maintenance of an electrical safety program (ESP). It includes key elements of an ESP and provides information on where the gaps may be in your existing program. © 2014 IEEE.


Crow D.R.,DRC Consulting Ltd. | Becker T.,ESPS Electrical Safety Program Solutions Inc.
Conference Record of the 2012 IEEE IAS Electrical Safety Workshop, ESW 2012 | Year: 2012

The purpose of this paper is to cover the process for development, implementation, and maintenance of an electrical safety program. It includes key elements of an electrical safety program and provides information on where the gaps may be in your existing program. © 2012 IEEE.


Crow D.R.,DRC Consulting Ltd.
IEEE IAS Electrical Safety Workshop | Year: 2015

This paper discusses how leadership qualities of the '12th Man' can improve electrical safety in your organization. Emotionally involving and committing everyone to safety at the level of a truly dedicated fan takes a game plan. The most effective work comes from high performance teams who value trust, communication, problem solving, and shared leadership roles. Job satisfaction is derived from involvement, contribution, and the feelings that come from making a difference. Every person can play a part in creating a superior safe work environment. The attainment of higher performance through the electrical safety program should begin with 'Why not me, Why not us?' [2]. Everyone has the opportunity to be a role model, to be involved in mentoring, to set personal goals, to participate in training, education, and share their ideas to improve safety. Personal growth and industry knowledge can be expanded through involvement in conferences and committees. Being a '12th Man' for electrical safety takes a higher level of commitment; it takes action, perseverance, and passion. © 2015 IEEE.

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