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Guwāhāti, India

Krishnatreya M.,Drb Borooah Cancer Institute | Rahman T.,Drb Borooah Cancer Institute | Kataki A.C.,Drb Borooah Cancer Institute | Sharma J.D.,Drb Borooah Cancer Institute | And 2 more authors.
Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention : APJCP | Year: 2014

Performance status (PS) is a key factor in the selection of treatment in head and neck cancer patients (HNC). There is a probability in the development of an unfavorable PS with HNC advancing stages. This retrospective study was done on data of patients registered during the period from January 2010 to December 2012 at a cancer registry in the North Eastern India. PS was recorded according to the WHO scale. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess the probability of poor performance status with advancing stage. Out of 3,593 patients, there were 78.9% (2,836) males and 21.1% (757) females. Average PS0 was seen in 57.4% of all HNCs, less than 1% of all cases in HNCs with poor PS3-4 except in cases with thyroid, parotid and nose and PNS cancers, 0.7% stage IV (±M1) HNC with PS4, favorable PS0-1 was seen in 84% to 100% of cases, RR=57.1 (CI=21.2-154.1) in M1 for PS4 and with advancing stages the probability of worsening of PS0 to PS4 was 3 times (P=0.021, 95% CI= 1.187-8.474). In HNC, the majority of patients presents with a favorable PS0- 1 with different odds of worsening of PS with advancing stages and the presence of metastasis in stage IV is significantly associated with a poor PS.


Krishnatreya M.,Drb Borooah Cancer Institute | Kataki A.C.,Drb Borooah Cancer Institute | Sharma J.D.,Drb Borooah Cancer Institute | Nandy P.,Drb Borooah Cancer Institute | And 3 more authors.
Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention | Year: 2014

Background: Cancers of the breast, uterine cervix and ovary are common cancers amongst females of North East India. Not much is known about the descriptive epidemiology of these cancers in our population. The present retrospective analysis was therefore performed. Materials and Methods: The data set available at the hospital based cancer registry of a regional cancer center of North-East India, containing information on patients registered during the period of January 2010 to December 2012, was applied. A total of 2,925 cases of breast, uterine cervix and ovarian cancer were identified. Results: Of the total, 1,295 (44.3%) were breast cancers, 1,214 (41.5%) were uterine cervix and 416 (14.2%) ovarian cancer, median age (range) for breast, uterine cervix and ovary were 45 (17-85), 48 (20-91) and 45 years (7-80), respectively. Some 43.5% of cases with uterine cervix patients were illiterate, 5.4% and 5.7% stage I in breast and cervix respectively and 96.4% of ovarian cancers in advanced stage. Conclusions: Improvement of female education can contribute to increase the proportion of early stage diagnosis of breast and uterine cervix in our population. Any population-based intervention for the detection of cancers of breast, uterine cervix and ovarian cancer should be started early in our population.


Krishnatreya M.,Drb Borooah Cancer Institute | Kataki A.C.,Drb Borooah Cancer Institute | Sharma J.D.,Drb Borooah Cancer Institute | Bhattacharyya M.,Drb Borooah Cancer Institute | And 2 more authors.
Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention | Year: 2014

Brain tumors are a mixed group of neoplasms that originate from the intracranial tissues and the meninges with degrees of malignancy varying greatly from benign to aggressive. Not much is known about the epidemiology of primary malignant brain tumors (PMBTs) in our population in North-East India. In this analysis, an attempt was made to identify the age groups, gender distribution, topography and different histological types of PMBT with data from a hospital cancer registry. A total of 231 cases of PMBT were identified and included for the present analysis. Our analysis has shown that most of PMBT occur at 20-60 years of age, with a male to female ratio of 2.3:1. Some 70.5% of cases occurred in cerebral lobes except for the occipital lobe, and astrocytic tumors were the most common broad histological type. In our population the prevalence of PMBT is 1% of all cancers, mostly affecting young and middle aged patients. As brain tumors are rare, so case-control analytic epidemiological studies will be required to establish the risk factors prevalent in our population.


Baishya N.,Drb Borooah Cancer Institute | Das A.K.,Drb Borooah Cancer Institute | Krishnatreya M.,Drb Borooah Cancer Institute | Das A.,Drb Borooah Cancer Institute | And 3 more authors.
Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention | Year: 2015

Background: Patient delay can contribute to a poor outcome in the management of head and neck cancers (HNC). The main objective of the present study was to investigate the factors associated with patient delay in our population. Materials and Methods: Patients with cancers of the head and neck attending a regional cancer center of North East India were consecutively interviewed during the period from June 2014 to November 2014. The participation of patients was voluntary. The questionnaire included information on age, gender, residential status, educational qualification, monthly family income, any family history of cancer, and history of prior awareness on cancer from television (TV) program and awareness program. Results: Of 311 (n) patients, with an age range of 14-88 years (mean 55.4 years), 81.7% were males and 18.3% females (M:F=4.4). The overall median delay was 90 days (range=7 days-365 days), in illiterate patients the median delay was 90 days and 60 days in literate patients (P=0.002), the median delay in patients who had watched cancer awareness program on TV was 60 days and in patients who were unaware about cancer information from TV program had a median delay of 90 days (p=0.00021) and delay of < 10 weeks was seen in 139 (44.6%) patients, a delay of 10-20 weeks in 98 (31.5%) patients, and a delay of 20-30 weeks in 63 (20.2%) patients. Conclusions: Education and awareness had a significant impact in reduction of median patient delay in our HNC cases.


Sharma J.D.,Drb Borooah Cancer Institute | Krishnatreya M.,Drb Borooah Cancer Institute | Das A.K.,Drb Borooah Cancer Institute | Bhattacharyya M.,Drb Borooah Cancer Institute | And 4 more authors.
Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention | Year: 2015

Background: The survival of patients with hypopharyngeal cancer is low amongst head and neck cancer cases. The incidence rates of hypopharyngeal cancers in our population are amongst the highest in the world and there are limited data available on the literature on varied responses to first course of treatment with radiotherapy (RT) and concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) in our population. Materials and Methods: Clinical characteristics and initial responses to treatment in patients who had received radiotherapy and chemo-radiotherapy in a regional cancer center from January 2010 to December 2013 were evaluated. The data were obtained from the hospital cancer registry, and analysis was carried using descriptive statistics. Pearson's chi-square was used to test for differences in the variables and p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 554 patients were included in the analysis, 411 (74.2%) receiving RT and 143 (25.8%) being given CRT. There was significantly lower number of patients above 70 years with a higher proportion of patients below 50 years who had received CRT (p < 0.05). Some 79.3% and 84.6% of patients in the RT and CRT groups respectively presented with a favorable performance status, and in the RT group 240 (58.4%) showed complete response (CR), and in the CRT group 103 (72.0%) showed CR at the first follow-up (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy gives better short term response to treatment in locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancers.

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