Dr Sami Ulus Maternity And Childrens Research And Training Hospital

Ankara, Turkey

Dr Sami Ulus Maternity And Childrens Research And Training Hospital

Ankara, Turkey
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PubMed | Dr Sami Ulus Maternity and Childrens Research and Training Hospital and Thoracic Surgery and Lung Disease Training Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: European journal of pediatric surgery reports | Year: 2015

Combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) using 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18-FDG) is one of the most effective methods to identify pathological lymph node involvement. We report the case of a child who underwent cervical lymph node biopsy and chemotherapy for Hodgkin disease. Three years after surgery, PET/CT identified an intense localization of 18-FDG in the inferior cervical region. This finding led to a reexcision of the mass. The only finding was a granuloma arising in reaction to a hemostatic sponge.


Oz F.,Dr Sami Ulus Maternity And Childrens Research And Training Hospital | Eksioglu A.,Dr Sami Ulus Maternity And Childrens Research And Training Hospital | Tanir G.,Dr Sami Ulus Maternity And Childrens Research And Training Hospital | Bayhan G.,Dr Sami Ulus Maternity And Childrens Research And Training Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases | Year: 2014

Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics and sonographic features of lymphadenopathy (LAP) and to evaluate the treatment modalities and treatment outcomes in children with tularemia. Materials and Methods: Demographic characteristics, ultrasonographic and physical examination findings, and treatment outcomes in 55 tularemia patients (24 male and 31 female) with a mean age of 10.8±4.0 years were analyzed retrospectively. Lymph node necrosis was classified in three stages based on ultrasound findings-stage 1, cortical microabscesses; stage 2, cortical and medullar abscesses; stage 3, total necrosis of the lymph node. Results: In total, 50 (90%) of the patients had oropharyngeal, four (8%) had glandular, and one (2%) had oculoglandular tularemia. The most common symptoms were sore throat (67%) and fever (64%). LAP was the most frequently (100%) observed sign. Abscess formation was noted in 36 (65%) patients, of which seven (19%) were sonographically classified as stage 1, 20 (55%) as stage 2, and nine (26%) as stage 3. There was a statistically significant correlation between delayed treatment and stage of abscess formation in lymph nodes (p<0.05). Treatment failure was observed in 24 (44%) patients. There was no significant correlation between treatment regimen and treatment failure (p>0.05). In all, nine (16%) of the patients did not respond to medical treatment, and surgical intervention was required. Conclusion: Tularemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children presenting with unexplained fever, sore throat, and cervical LAP in endemic areas. Sonographic findings may be useful in the evaluation and staging of this infection. © 2014 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Erdogan D.,Dr Sami Ulus Maternity and Childrens Research and Training Hospital | Karaman I.,Dr Sami Ulus Maternity and Childrens Research and Training Hospital | Aslan M.K.,Dr Sami Ulus Maternity and Childrens Research and Training Hospital | Karaman A.,Dr Sami Ulus Maternity and Childrens Research and Training Hospital | Cavusoglu Y.H.,Dr Sami Ulus Maternity and Childrens Research and Training Hospital
Journal of Pediatric Surgery | Year: 2013

Background/Purpose: This study describes the pediatric inguinal hernia and hydrocele experience of a tertiary care training hospital. Methods: A total of 3776 patients who had been operated between January 2005 and June 2009 for inguinal hernia, cord hydrocele, and hydrocele were included. The surgeries and patient follow-up were performed by 6 pediatric surgery specialists and 8 pediatric surgery residents. Results: The patient age varied from 6 days to 17 years. There were 2959 (78.4%) males and 817 (21.6%) females (ratio: 3.6:1). The hernia was on the right in 2306 (61.1%) patients, on the left in 1111 (29.4%) patients, and bilateral in 359 (9.5%) patients. Age at presentation was younger in males (p <.001). Contralateral hernia repair was required later on during follow-up in 2% of the patients. Postoperative complications developed in 1.2% of the patients. Reoperation was needed because of wound infection in 0.6%, recurrence in 0.4%, hematoma in 0.1%, testicular atrophy in 1 patient, and acquired undescended testis in 1 patient. Conclusions: The age of first hernia symptoms was younger in males compared to females and in premature babies compared to term babies (p <.05). The recurrent hernia rate was higher in infancy. The complication rate was higher in hernia surgery in the newborn period and in cases of incarcerated hernia compared to the overall rate (p <.05). There was no indication for contralateral routine exploration. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Bayhan-Tas G.I.,Dr Sami Ulus Maternity And Childrens Research And Training Hospital | Tanir G.,Dr Sami Ulus Maternity And Childrens Research And Training Hospital | Celebi B.,Refik Saydam Hifzissthha Communicable Diseases Research Center
Turkish Journal of Pediatrics | Year: 2012

Tularemia is a bacterial zoonotic disease that is caused by Francisella tularensis. E tularensis is transmitted to humans by handling infected animals, ingestion of contaminated food or water, inhalation of infective aerosols, and arthropod bites. Tularemia outbreaks have been commonly reported in some areas of Europe, such as Sweden, Finland, Portugal, Spain, Kosovo, and Turkey. Tularemia has six different clinical forms, depending on the route of transmission. In TUrkey, the most common type is the oropharyngeal form. We present two cases of glandular tularemia with inguinal lymphadenopathy, which is an uncommon manifestation of this disease in our country. The patients were treated with gentamicin for 10 days and completely recovered. Glandular tularemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of inguinal lymphadenopathy.


Koc M.,Dr Sami Ulus Maternity And Childrens Research And Training Hospital | Kutsal A.,Dr Sami Ulus Maternity And Childrens Research And Training Hospital
Turk Geriatri Dergisi | Year: 2015

The incidences of heart and vascular diseases increase with age and it is known to be the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in developed countries. Although aging is a chronological process, it is known that some environmental factors, chronic diseases and lifestyle may form and speed up the process of aging, especially of the cardiovascular system. Due to the changes that occur at structural and molecular levels in the vascular system of the elderly, the function of the cardiovascular system becomes impaired. Vascular aging is a normal physiological process, which develops gradually along with the age. The most known pathophysiological vascular changes are the ones beginning at the intimal level such as atherosclerosis. However, the other vascular pathologies leading to the thickness in media and adventitia and remodeling are also seen in aging even if atherosclerosis is not present. These changes include an increase in collagen fibers and covalent bonds, local inflammation, fibrosis, mucous matter storage, a marked decrease in the elastin composition and the classifications of elastic laminas. Aging related differences develop independently of the atherosclerosis. They create a cumulative effect by activating the atherosclerosis with contributions of other factors such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, renal failure, dietary, genetic and smoking along with aging. When the format and the mechanism of occurrence of these changes in the growing elderly population are carefully managed today, we can take a considerable step towards protecting the community from cardiovascular events and diseases. © 2015, Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Dr Sami Ulus Maternity And Childrens Research And Training Hospital
Type: | Journal: Case reports in infectious diseases | Year: 2014

Chryseobacterium indologenes is a rare cause of infection in children. The organism causes infections mostly in hospitalised patients with severe underlying diseases. The choice of an effective drug for the treatment of infections due to C. indologenes is difficult as the organism has a limited spectrum of antimicrobial sensitivity. We present a case of nosocomial septicemia caused by C. indologenes in an infant with congenital heart disease who was successfully treated with trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole and also reviewed fourteen additional cases of C. indologenes infections reported in the English literature in this report.


PubMed | Dr Sami Ulus Maternity And Childrens Research And Training Hospital
Type: Case Reports | Journal: The Turkish journal of pediatrics | Year: 2012

Tularemia is a bacterial zoonotic disease that is caused by Francisella tularensis. E tularensis is transmitted to humans by handling infected animals, ingestion of contaminated food or water, inhalation of infective aerosols, and arthropod bites. Tularemia outbreaks have been commonly reported in some areas of Europe, such as Sweden, Finland, Portugal, Spain, Kosovo, and Turkey. Tularemia has six different clinical forms, depending on the route of transmission. In Turkey, the most common type is the oropharyngeal form. We present two cases of glandular tularemia with inguinal lymphadenopathy, which is an uncommon manifestation of this disease in our country. The patients were treated with gentamicin for 10 days and completely recovered. Glandular tularemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of inguinal lymphadenopathy.


PubMed | Dr Sami Ulus Maternity And Childrens Research And Training Hospital
Type: Case Reports | Journal: The Turkish journal of pediatrics | Year: 2016

Drug-induced dystonic reactions are a common presentation to the Pediatric Emergency Department frequently with antiemetics, antidepressants, dopamineblocking agents and antipyschotics. We report a case of generalized form of dystonia after taking albendazole and cetirizine. There is only one case with albendazole induced and two cases with cetirizine induced dystonia in the literature.


PubMed | Dr Sami Ulus Maternity And Childrens Research And Training Hospital
Type: Case Reports | Journal: The Turkish journal of pediatrics | Year: 2015

Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis in children. It is also responsible for bacteremia, sepsis, pneumonia, sinusitis and acute otitis media in young children worldwide. The serotypes included in the 7-valent conjugated pneumococcal vaccine (PCV7)-1, 5, 6A, 6B, 14, 19F, 23F-are those most commonly responsible for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) globally. Unvaccinated children are at greater risk for meningitis. The rate of non-vaccine serotypes as causes of invasive disease has increased. Although the incidence rate of IPD is highest in children aged <2 years, the rare, non-vaccine serotypes of S. pneumoniae may be responsible for acute meningitis in older, unvaccinated children. In this report, we present a pediatric case of meningitis due to S. pneumoniae serotype 33D, which has not been previously identified as a cause of IPD in those countries where PCV7 is routinely administered, including Turkey.


PubMed | Dr Sami Ulus Maternity And Childrens Research And Training Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Turkish journal of pediatrics | Year: 2016

Synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists are becoming increasingly popular in adolescent age group as an abused substance. Therefore, pediatric emergency physicians should be prepared for Bonzai utilizations which are being more common day by day. The aim of the study is to investigate cases who admitted to a pediatric emergency service with use of Bonzai.

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