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Onder A.,Dr Sami Ulus Gynecology And Obstetrics And Pediatrics Training And Research Hospital | Kendirci H.N.P.,Dr Sami Ulus Gynecology And Obstetrics And Pediatrics Training And Research Hospital | Bas V.N.,Dr Sami Ulus Gynecology And Obstetrics And Pediatrics Training And Research Hospital | Agladioglu S.Y.,Dr Sami Ulus Gynecology And Obstetrics And Pediatrics Training And Research Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism | Year: 2012

Conn syndrome, which is rarely encountered in children, is characterized by increased aldosterone, low renin level, and arterial hypertension. Severe complications, such as impaired vascular smooth muscle function secondary to increased aldosterone, endothelial dysfunction, deterioration of left ventricular functions, acute effects on the cardiovascular system, and proteinuria, may be observed. We present a case of primary aldosteronism in a patient who has been followed up for ̃ 2 years. A 15-year-old girl complained of headache lasting for ̃ 1.5 years, which was diagnosed as severe hypertension. All of her systemic examinations were normal other than the hypertension. Primary aldosteronism was diagnosed on the basis of hypokalemia and alkalosis accompanied by plasma renin activity of 3.9 ng/mL/h and an aldosterone level of 1007 pg/mL (normal: 40 - 480). Left adrenalectomy was performed because a 10 × 12 × 12 mm adenoma was detected on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging. Although aldosterone levels returned to normal values after the surgery, antihypertensive treatment was continued because of the persistent hypertension. As the 24-h ambulatory blood pressure values of the patient were normal at 10 months after the operation, the treatment was stopped, and she was followed up for 15 months without any treatment. Since then, she has been normotensive. © 2012 by Walter de Gruyter. Source

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