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Pech O.,Dr. Horst Schmidt Klinik Wiesbaden
Video Journal and Encyclopedia of GI Endoscopy | Year: 2013

Schatzki rings (lower esophageal rings) are mostly asymptomatic. However, they are considered the most common cause of dysphagia or food impaction. Diagnosis can usually be made during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy by careful inspection of the esophago-gastric junction. This article is part of an expert video encyclopedia. © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. Source


Pohl J.,Dr. Horst Schmidt Klinik Wiesbaden
Video Journal and Encyclopedia of GI Endoscopy | Year: 2013

Hyperplastic polyposis is a rare syndrome characterized by the development of multiple colorectal serrated lesions, most often a mixture of hyperplastic polyps and flat serrated adenomas. Patients with hyperplastic polyposis syndrome (HPS) have a high lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer (up to 50%). However, at colonoscopy the diagnosis is often missed because the flat lesions are not recognized or the endoscopist is simply unaware of this syndrome. Here the author presents three cases with HPS and demonstrates the typical endoscopic features. This article is part of an expert video encyclopedia. © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. Source


Pech O.,Dr. Horst Schmidt Klinik Wiesbaden
Video Journal and Encyclopedia of GI Endoscopy | Year: 2013

Large hiatal hernias are usually asymptomatic, but can also accompany gastroesophageal reflux or iron deficiency anemia. Cameron lesions and ulcers are erosions or ulcers on the gastric folds at the level of the diaphragm and can sometimes be seen in patients with large hiatal hernias. The Cameron lesions can cause iron deficiency anemia due to acute or chronic bleeding. This article is part of an expert video encyclopedia. © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. Source


Pohl J.,Dr. Horst Schmidt Klinik Wiesbaden
Video Journal and Encyclopedia of GI Endoscopy | Year: 2013

An epiphrenic diverticulum occurs from increased pressure during esophageal propulsive contractions against a closed lower esophagus. This article is part of an expert video encyclopedia. © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. Source


Pohl J.,Dr. Horst Schmidt Klinik Wiesbaden
Video Journal and Encyclopedia of GI Endoscopy | Year: 2013

Pancreatic duct stones are a common complication of chronic pancreatitis. Although most pancreatic duct stones can be targeted by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and extracted by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, large and radiolucent stones remain a therapeutic challenge. The author describes a case of a 54-year-old man with chronic pancreatitis and a large pancreatic duct stone with a downstream stricture within the pancreatic head. After balloon dilation of the obstruction, direct pancreatoscopy with an ultraslim endoscope was performed and the stone under direct vision was extracted successfully. This article is part of an expert video encyclopedia. © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. Source

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