Dow Wolff Cellulosics

Midland, MI, United States

Dow Wolff Cellulosics

Midland, MI, United States
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Huebner-Keese B.,Dow Wolff Cellulosics | Guo J.,Dow Chemical Company | Adden R.,Dow Wolff Cellulosics | Devon M.,Dow Chemical Company | And 2 more authors.
Gums and Stabilisers for the Food Industry 18 - Hydrocolloid Functionality for Affordable and Sustainable Global Food Solutions | Year: 2016

Oil and fat consumption are considered a major factor increasing health risks such as obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol levels or high blood pressure, coronary heart disease, etc. As a consequence, consumer trends are slowly moving toward healthier foods and low-fat products, creating the need to reduce the amount of oil absorbed in fried products and reduce fat content in meat products. Deep fried foods are globally appreciated due to their distinct flavor, taste, aroma and crunchy texture. However, there is an increasing consumer's awareness about the considerable fat content in deep fried foods. Lowering the overall fat content without adversely altering the crispy outer layer and softer inner texture will enhance the appeal of fried foods. A batter/ breader coating technology with modified methyl cellulose was developed to coat fried food before frying, and thus to control and reduce the oil uptake due to the film forming property of the coating. The coating behaves as an oil barrier to block the entrance for excess oil penetration into food matrix. This work has enabled us to develop technologies that achieve > 30% reduction in the fat content of several deep fried foods including French fries, chicken nuggets, fried fish etc. Full fat meat products provide great texture and taste. The fat content is key for sensory of such products. In low fat meat products methylcellulose offers structure and bite for example in low fat sausages. Emulsions with water content up to 90%, stabilized by methyl cellulose, are used to replace unhealthy saturated fats or reduce the total fat content up to 30% in meat applications. Due to thermal gelation of methyl cellulose the meat products provide excellent succulent mouth feel. Novel methyl cellulose with lower melt back temperature is able to even provide juicy bite at cold temperature.


Kim H.,University of California at Davis | Kim H.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Bartley G.E.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Young S.A.,Dow Wolff Cellulosics | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2013

The effect of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) on hepatic gene expression was analyzed by exon microarray and real-time PCR from livers of diet-induced obese (DIO) mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet supplemented with either 6% HPMC or 6% microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). HPMC-fed mice exhibited significantly reduced body weight gain (55% lower compared to MCC), liver weight (13%), plasma LDL-cholesterol concentration (45%), and HF diet-increased intestinal permeability (48%). HPMC significantly reduced areas under the curve for 2 h insulin and glucose responses, indicating enhanced insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism. HPMC up-regulated hepatic genes related to fatty acid oxidation, cholesterol and bile acid synthesis, and cellular activation of glucocorticoid (bile acid recycling) and down-regulated genes related to oxidative stress, triglyceride synthesis, and polyunsaturated fatty acid elongation. In conclusion, HPMC consumption ameliorates the effects of a HF diet on intestinal permeability, insulin resistance, hepatic lipid accumulation, glucocorticoid-related bile acid recycling, oxidative stress, and weight gain in DIO mice. © 2013 American Chemical Society.


Kim H.,University of California at Davis | Kim H.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Bartley G.E.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Young S.A.,Dow Wolff Cellulosics | And 2 more authors.
Molecular Nutrition and Food Research | Year: 2012

Scope: The effects of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), a highly viscous nonfermentable soluble dietary fiber, were evaluated on adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet supplemented with either HPMC or insoluble fiber. Methods and results: DIO C57BL/6J mice were fed a HF diet supplemented with 6% HPMC or 6% microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). Gene expression analyses of epididymal adipose tissue by exon microarray and real-time PCR along with glucose and insulin tolerance and intestinal permeability were assessed. HPMC-fed mice exhibited significantly reduced body weight gain and adipose tissue weight as well as reduced areas under the curve for 2-h insulin and glucose responses. HPMC significantly decreased HF diet-induced intestinal permeability. Overall, HPMC enhanced insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism and downregulated genes related to inflammation and immune response, adipogenesis, and oxidative stress markers. Pathway analysis of microarray data identified lipid metabolism, inflammatory disease, and acute phase response pathways as being differentially regulated by HPMC. Conclusion: These results suggest HPMC consumption ameliorates HF diet effects on obesity-induced insulin resistance, adipose tissue inflammatory and immune responses, weight gain, as well as intestinal permeability. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Kim H.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Kim H.,University of California at Davis | Turowski M.,Dow Wolff Cellulosics | Anderson W.H.K.,Dow Wolff Cellulosics | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2011

We investigated in Syrian Golden hamsters the biological impact and its underlying mechanism of single whole grain breads supplemented with 2-3% hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), a semisynthetic viscous soluble dietary fiber (SDF) as a substitute for gluten. Hamsters were fed high-fat diets supplemented with 48-65% (w/w) differently ground, freeze-dried single grain breads including whole grain wheat, barley, barley supplemented with HPMC, debranned oat, and oat supplemented with HPMC which were compared to a diet containing microcrystalline cellulose (control). All single grain breads significantly lowered plasma LDL-cholesterol concentrations compared to the control. Enrichment with HPMC further lowered plasma and hepatic cholesterol concentrations. Despite the reduced molecular weight of naturally occurring soluble (1→3),(1→4)-β-d-glucan (β-glucan) caused by the bread-making process, whole grain barley breads downregulated hepatic expression of CYP7A1 and HMG-CoAR genes that are responsible for bile acid and cholesterol synthesis, suggesting a possible role of bioactive compounds such as short-chain fatty acids and phenolic compounds from barley bread. Barley bread enriched with HPMC downregulated expression of ABCG5 gene. Taken together, it appears that distinctive modulation of synthesis and excretion of hepatic cholesterol and bile acid contributes to the cholesterol-lowering properties of whole grain barley breads and breads enriched with HPMC. These data suggests that alternative whole grain breads supplemented with HPMC may provide consumers with a staple food that can assist in cholesterol management. © 2011 American Chemical Society.


Knarr M.,Dow Wolff Cellulosics | Adden R.,Dow Wolff Cellulosics | Anderson W.H.K.,Dow Chemical Company | Hubner-Keese B.,Dow Wolff Cellulosics
Food Hydrocolloids | Year: 2012

Rheological properties of aqueous solutions of a novel methyl cellulose has been compared to the performance of a conventional methyl cellulose. Gel formation of these materials is trigged only by increased temperatures. The low gelation temperature of the novel methyl cellulose enables this material to gel at body temperature. Compression measurements of the gels at various concentrations were performed and the investigated gel strength could be fitted according to an exponential equitation. The comparison to alginate as a known gel forming agent by acidification and known as satiety inducing agent showed comparable gel strength at 37 °C. Therefore, a potential of the novel methyl cellulose for human weight management applications has been identified. Gel formation in the human stomach could lead to a satiety effect. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

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