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Dongguan, China

Pang X.-M.,Guangxi Medical University | Liu J.-L.,Guangxi Medical University | Li J.-P.,Guangxi Medical University | Huang L.-G.,Guangxi Medical University | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Neurochemistry | Year: 2015

Previous studies have shown that fastigial nucleus stimulation (FNS) reduces tissue damage resulting from focal cerebral ischemia. Although the mechanisms of neuroprotection induced by FNS are not entirely understood, important data have been presented in the past two decades. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a newly discovered group of non-coding small RNA molecules that negatively regulate target gene expression and are involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and cell apoptosis. To date, no studies have demonstrated whether miRNAs can serve as mediators of the brain's response to FNS, which leads to endogenous neuroprotection. Therefore, this study investigated the profiles of FNS-mediated miRNAs. Using a combination of deep sequencing and microarray with computational analysis, we identified a novel miRNA in the rat ischemic cortex after 1 h of FNS. This novel miRNA (PC-3p-3469-406), herein referred to as rno-miR-676-1, was upregulated in rats with cerebral ischemia after FNS. In vivo observations indicate that this novel miRNA may have antiapoptotic effects and contribute to neuroprotection induced by FNS. Our study provides a better understanding of neuroprotection induced by FNS. MicroRNA (miRNA) is defined as a small non-coding RNA that fulfills both the expression and biogenesis criteria. Here, we describe a novel miRNA in the rat ischemic cortex expressed after 1 h of fastigial nucleus stimulation (FNS). The miRNA was functionally characterized by secondary structure, quantitative expression, the conservation analysis, target gene analysis, and biological functions. We consider rno-miR-676-1 to be a true microRNA and present evidence for its neuroprotective effects exerted after induction by FNS. MicroRNA (miRNA) is defined as a small non-coding RNA that fulfills both the expression and biogenesis criteria. Here, we describe a novel miRNA in the rat ischemic cortex expressed after 1 h of fastigial nucleus stimulation (FNS). The miRNA was functionally characterized by secondary structure, quantitative expression, the conservation analysis, target gene analysis, and biological functions. We consider rno-miR-676-1 to be a true microRNA and present evidence for its neuroprotective effects exerted after induction by FNS. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.


Feng L.-B.,Guangxi Medical University | Pang X.-M.,Guangxi Medical University | Zhang L.,Dongguan Kanghua Hospital | Li J.-P.,Guangxi Medical University | And 7 more authors.
BMC Medical Genomics | Year: 2015

Background: Neurogenic neuroprotection is a promising approach for treating patients with ischemic brain lesions. Fastigial nucleus stimulation (FNS) has been shown to reduce the tissue damage resulting from focal cerebral ischemia in the earlier studies. However, the mechanisms of neuroprotection induced by FNS remain unclear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a newly discovered group of non-coding small RNA molecules that negatively regulate target gene expression and involved in the regulation of pathological process. To date, there is a lack of knowledge on the expression of miRNA in response to FNS. Thus, we study the regulation of miRNAs in the rat ischemic brain by the neuroprotection effect of FNS. Methods: In this study, we used an established focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (IR) model in rats. MiRNA expression profile of rat ischemic cortex after 1 h of FNS were investigated using deep sequencing. Microarray was performed to study the expression pattern of miRNAs. Functional annotation on the miRNA was carried out by bioinformatics analysis. Results: Two thousand four hundred ninety three miRNAs were detected and found to be miRNAs or miRNA candidates using deep sequencing technology. We found that the FNS-related miRNAs were differentially expressed according microarray data. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that several differentially expressed miRNAs might be a central node of neuroprotection-associated genetic networks and contribute to neuroprotection induced by FNS. Conclusions: MiRNA acts as a novel regulator and contributes to FNS-induced neuroprotection. Our study provides a better understanding of neuroprotection induced by FNS. © 2015 Feng et al.


OBJECTIVE: Based on our previous animal study, we applied the “bridging effect” to the neighboring axial flap through preexpansion and prefabrication of a skin perforator flap as a new method to reconstruct a large skin defect after release of severe neck burn scar contracture. METHODS: Twelve patients suffering from severe post-burn cervical contractures underwent reconstruction of large skin defects after surgical release of severe scar contractures with preexpanded and prefabricated super-thin skin perforator flaps supplied primarily by a number of perforators via the “bridging effect” from the branches of the adjacent arteries as 2-stage procedures. During the first-stage operation, 2 tissue expanders were placed accordingly, and this was followed by a subsequent second-stage procedure where an expanded super-thin skin perforator flap was transposed to reconstruct a large neck skin defect. Follow-up was between 6 months and 3 years in this series. RESULTS: All super-thin skin perforator flaps survived in this series with primary healing except one with a distal flap necrosis that was treated with a subsequent skin graft. All patients have had a good contour with improved range of motion in the neck. CONCLUSIONS: The preexpansion and prefabrication of a super-thin skin perforator flap can possibly improve the anastomoses between neighboring subdermal vascular plexuses and extend the supplying area of these vessels to the flap. This method may provide a favorable super-thin skin flap that can be used for reconstruction of large neck defects after release of post-burn cervical scar contracture as demonstrated in this case series. Copyright © 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


BACKGROUND: Because the course and territory of perforators are different in each region, careful preoperative planning to identify the proper perforators can be critical to ensure a successful dissection of a freestyle pedicled perforator flap. In this study, our first experience for preoperative perforator mapping of a freestyle pedicled perforator flap using multidetector row computed tomography (MD-CT) angiography is presented. METHODS: Twelve patients were planned to undergo various soft-tissue reconstructions with freestyle pedicled perforator flaps. They were evaluated with preoperative MD-CT angiography. The OsiriX for mac software was used to process the data obtained from MD-CT angiography. The available images from MD-CT angiography were analyzed to determine where the proper perforators were located for preoperative planning of a freestyle pedicled perforator flap. Through the MD-CT angiography, the optimal perforators were mapped and a reliable flap design could be made so that the flap was elevated more safely and perfectly to cover an adjacent soft-tissue defect. RESULTS: In all 12 patients, each flap was elevated successfully based on the perforators mapped preoperatively with MD-CT angiography. A total of 27 perforators (1–3 perforators per flap) were identified by MD-CT angiography in 12 patients and later confirmed during the flap dissection (sensitivity, 100%). CONCLUSIONS: The MD-CT angiography can be a new but very effective imaging modality for preoperative planning of a freestyle pedicled perforator flap surgery. It allows surgeons to accurately select the most appropriate perforators with the shortest intramuscular or suprafascial course preoperatively leading to safer and easier flap dissection. Copyright © 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Lin J.-Y.,University of Taipei | Wang C.,Dongguan Kanghua Hospital | Pu L.L.Q.,University of California at Davis
Clinics in Plastic Surgery | Year: 2015

Fat grafting still remains technique dependent with possible less favorable long-term results because there are no standardized techniques used by the surgeon to perform the procedure. In this article, the authors have tried to standardize the techniques for fat grafting as first proposed and popularized by Coleman. These techniques, supported by the most recent scientific studies and understandings of clinical course following autologous fat transplantation, emphasize proper fat harvesting, processing, and placement so that a predictable long-lasting result can be achieved. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.

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