Mandaluyong City, Philippines
Mandaluyong City, Philippines

Don Bosco Technical College is a private Catholic educational institution owned and operated by the Salesians of Don Bosco. DBTC is deemed as the "Motherhouse of all Salesian Works in the Philippines," making it the premier Salesian institution for higher-learning in the country. Its campus is located at 736 General Kalentong Street in Mandaluyong City, Metro Manila, Philippines. Don Bosco Mandaluyong offers all-boys elementary education, all-boys secondary education, co-educational tertiary education, night school , and vocational training for out-of-school male youth. The college department was formerly exclusive for males until the year 2004 when the department made history by accepting female students.It is part of the IUS or the Istituzioni Universitarie Salesiane , the Don Bosco Educational Apostolate of the Philippines and the Don Bosco Philippines North Province . Don Bosco Mandaluyong was awarded with the ISO 9001:2000 certification by Moody International Certification Sdn. Bhd. and United Kingdom Accreditation Service.Don Bosco Mandaluyong is envisaged as one of the 'big three' schools in Mandaluyong City, together with La Salle Green Hills and Lourdes School of Mandaluyong, which also offer all-boys elementary education and all-boys secondary education. These three are well-renowned educational institutions, synonymous to the city's moniker. However, DBTC is the leading all-boys school in Mandaluyong because of its unique style and way of learning-Academic and Technical. Wikipedia.


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Buerano J.,Don Bosco Technical College | Zalameda J.,Don Bosco Technical College | Ruiz R.S.,Don Bosco Technical College
Computers and Electronics in Agriculture | Year: 2012

An impact acoustic free-fall setup was developed to distinguish the difference between the frequency of undamaged and damaged rice kernels using frequency analysis. The study determined the different design parameters of the impact acoustic system that would classify undamaged and damaged rice kernel for a particular/specific microphone. Two cardiods and one hypercardiod (AKG CK 91, Neumann KM 184, and Shure Beta 58A) microphones were used for this study. All three microphones underwent the experimental test which determined the appropriate distance of each microphone, and drop height of the samples from each impact surface (acrylic glass and metal). Results produced different peak amplitude outputs for each acoustic setup. The study also showed distinct frequency signature for both undamaged and damaged kernels. Validation experiments produced 93.3%, 91.1%, and 88.9% recognition accuracy for the three microphones, respectively. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

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