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News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.techradar.com

Apple's casting the net wide when it comes to hiring the right people to get its nascent augmented reality project off the ground. According to a new report from Bloomberg, the company has been tapping up employees of Nasa for the project, hiring Jeff Norris, founder of the Mission Operations Innovation Office of Nasa's Jet Propulsion Lab. Norris was responsible for getting Microsoft's HoloLens onto the International Space Station, and for work in getting offworld technology such as Mars rovers to work with VR and AR gadgetry back on Earth. So he's definitely got the expertise the Cupertino company is after. Bloomberg's sources state that Norris has been with Apple since earlier this year, working as part of an augmented reality team being headed up by former Dolby Labs executive Mike Rockwell. Norris has been specifically tasked with bringing Apple's augmented reality glasses to life, as well as feature for future iPhones that will make use of augmented reality technologies. Tim Cook, Apple CEO, seems to be betting the farm on AR tech as the future of personal computing. Predicting that AR experiences will become as ubiquitous as "eating three meals a day", he's been uncharacteristically vocal in singing the praises of the potential of augmented reality. Whereas companies like Facebook, Google and Samsung seem more invested in chasing the potential in virtual reality, Tim Cook has actively steered Apple away from that area. With a saturated smartphone market, stalling tablet sales and rocky computing market, Apple will hope its AR interests inject fresh excitement into its product portfolio.


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.techradar.com

You’ve all-but perfected the smartphone with the iPhone, invented a new computing category with the iPad tablet, have embedded a voice assistant into enough gadgets to make Siri a household name, and have somehow encouraged an army of followers to accept the need to buy a junk-shop’s worth of dongles every time you tweak a product line. If you’re Apple, king of the tech hill, where do you go next? The answer, it seems, lay with augmented reality. Specifically, Apple AR glasses seem to be the ‘next big thing’ that Tim Cook’s world-conquering tech brand is set to unleash upon the world. So what do we know about the rumored Apple augmented reality glasses so far? When will the Apple AR spectacles be released, and what could a pair of Apple AR glasses offer that the world’s current smartphone screens and VR headsets can’t? Read on to find out! What is it? A new Apple wearable, a pair of glasses making use of augmented reality tech. When is it out? No fixed date, but a reveal as early as summer 2017 is possible. What will it cost? Based on Snap Spectacles pricing, anything from $130/ £105/ AU$170 and upwards - but anything ten times as costly could be possible depending on Apple’s final configuration. You’re familiar with the concept of virtual reality, right? Popping on a headset and having software transport you to an interactive, 360-degree, left, right, up, down, all-encompassing virtual world? Augmented reality works a bit like that but with one big difference. Rather than giving a window into an invented world, it uses either screens or transparent lenses to place digital items on top of the real world around you. The most popular examples of this in action today would be Snapchat’s stickers (the ones that put slobbering dog tongues and cat ears on your moving videos intelligently), or Pokemon Go which puts Pikachu and co into your world through a combination of your phone’s camera and screen. Both see your real world “augmented” by software on your smart device. Essentially, AR lets you get context sensitive digital information overlaid onto your real world surroundings – look at a subway station and get train times automatically displayed, for instance, or walk down the aisles of a food store and have the specs recommend a recipe. Apple’s iPhone 8 is thought to lean heavily on AR technology, but dedicated AR wearables already exist from rivals, too. Of the big name players, Snapchat’s nascent efforts see it cheat a little, with the Snap Spectacles amounting to little more than a head mounted camera in a glasses frame, feeding into the core Snapchat app. Microsoft’s HoloLens is more ambitious, putting Windows PC capabilities into a headset that lets you access everything from a web browser to Minecraft within your real world. And then of course there’s Google Glass – which saw its buzz burn out pretty quickly, thanks to a screen that sat uncomfortably in front of your eye offering hard-to-read information overlays. CAPITALISM. Those shareholders’ appetites for mansions and swimming pools won’t be sated! But on a serious note, Apple’s in need of a new product category. The last time Apple launched an inarguably successful new product line was the iPad – and even that has proved difficult to maintain momentum in. AR is an exciting new area, and one in which Apple (at least in hardware terms) wouldn’t have huge competition in, at least in the present. Yes, there’s the Microsoft HoloLens – but that’s primarily being billed currently as a business-orientated device. Google’s Glass failure has seen it put more time into its VR based Daydream View and Cardboard projects, while Samsung likewise continues with its Gear VR efforts. It’s an opportunity for Apple to set itself aside from the pack and, for Tim Cook, to launch a product that doesn’t have the shadow of the late Steve Jobs looming over it. Tim Cook has sung the praises of AR tech , going so far as to say augmented reality use will become as common as "eating three meals a day". "A significant portion of the population of developed countries, and eventually all countries, will have AR experiences every day," he said during the 2016 Utah Tech tour, before casting shade on VR. "I can't imagine everyone in here getting in an enclosed VR experience while you're sitting in here with me," said Cook to those assembled for the Utah talk. "AR is going to take a while, because there are some really hard technology challenges there," he added. "But it will happen, it will happen in a big way, and we will wonder when it does, how we ever lived without it. Like we wonder how we lived without our phone today." So, Apple’s definitely working on AR in some form – Tim Cook’s comments make no question of that at this point. Source claim that the iPhone 8 will be the big start for Apple’s AR ambitions , with iPhone leading the charge for dedicated AR hardware to follow. But it’s moving fast, and with big teams. Apple is said to have 1,000 engineers working on an AR project in Israel , and has purchased multiple AR firms including Tel Aviv's PrimeSense (focused on 3D sensing tech) and RealFace (facial recognition cyber security experts). It’s also made a . According to a report from , Apple has poached a leading employee of Nasa for the project, hiring Jeff Norris, founder of the Mission Operations Innovation Office of Nasa's Jet Propulsion Lab. He is said to be working as part of an augmented reality team being headed up by another poached talent, Dolby Labs executive Mike Rockwell. Apple has also been related to AR and VR technologies, including a headset with headphones built in and a remote control. Perhaps most telling of all is a leaked injury report , which suggests Apple is working on a “prototype unit” which has resulted in eye injuries for two users. It’s unlikely an iPhone or MacBook prototype would result in eye injury at this mature stage in their ongoing development – but a potential new product, the details of which are still being hammered out, which will likely sit right in front of your eyes? We have our culprit, it seems. Software patents have trickled through too – a submission from February 2010 saw Apple trying to protect an idea it had regarding “ ”, shows off how digital mapping data could be overlaid onto real-time video from an 's camera. Any success with iPhone would likely be easily translated to the dedicated glasses devices. There’s also a suggestion that, , Apple is looking to develop its own chipsets with AR technology as a key development target. That’s a tough question, as there’s no real precedent for this sort of thing yet. On one hand, you’ve got the incredibly basic Snap Spectacles which are priced around $130/ £105/ AU$170. But we’re expecting Apple’s AR glasses to be far more feature rich than this. On the other, you have HoloLens. It’s not really a consumer device, and is only available on a limited basis to developers at a cost of $3,000 (£2,719, AU$4,369). But Apple’s glasses will likely be built to mass-market scale, and with consumers (and associated price tags) in mind. So it’s a guessing game really. Keeping in mind that Apple tends to slap a premium on its devices, a broad estimate of somewhere between $500/$AU670/£400 and $1,000/£800/AU$1,300 could be the ballpark. But don’t hold us to that.


News Article | October 27, 2016
Site: co.newswire.com

Amlogic and Dolby Labs announce Dolby Vision in Amlogic's S912 series chipsets for set-top box use. Dolby Vision delivers a dramatic visual experience that brings entertainment to life with astonishing brightness, contrast, and color. With Dolby Vision, Amlogic offers an SoC solution for set-top box makers who want to offer Internet-based or OTT viewing.


News Article | March 25, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

David Pedigo is the senior director of learning & emerging trends at CEDIA. Pedigo oversees CEDIA's training and certification department as well as the Technology Council, whose mission is to inform members and industry partners on emerging trends, threats and opportunities within the custom electronics sector. Pedigo contributed this article to Tom's Guide's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights. When most people think of the latest and greatest in home theater, they recall articles, photos and conversations about the newest screen or projector — the visual display. However, there is another component to home theaters that is the true all-star when it comes to creating a cinema-like experience in our homes: Surround-sound systems are what enable home theaters to deliver a truly transformative experience. Soon enough, when we think of the latest and greatest in home theater, we'll all be talking about the leaps and bounds being made in the newest audio formats, the immersive audio. The cinematic experience has long been dominated by surround sound. Classics like "Star Wars: Episode IV" and "Jurassic Park" were among the first modern movies to use this sound format, which has since progressed from using two speakers to five speakers to seven speakers — or more. Regardless of the number of speakers, until recently the audio still simply surrounded you on a horizontal plane. It's only when you have an immersive, multilayered audio experience that you realize how much deeper into a scene an audio system can take you. With movies like "Mockingjay: Part 2," "Sicario" and "Star Wars: The Force Awakens," we're becoming genuinely immersed in the action of these films through a new approach to audio. MORE: Our Favorite Soundbars for Small and Big TVs Immersive audio is allowing sound engineers to get creative with speaker placements by adding elevated and/or overhead speakers to the traditional horizontal plane format used with traditional 5.1 or 7.1 surround-sound systems. Imagine using additional speakers to create a 3D space where you're hearing sounds from not only around you, but above you. Multichannel audio companies like Dolby Labs, DTS and Auro Technologies are working to make this experience achievable with Dolby Atmos, DTS Neo:X and Auro-3D, respectively. Immersive audio also steps outside the boundaries of a channel-based audio system and challenges sound engineers to use an object-based approach, moving away from the traditional trend of pairing sounds with specific speakers on a horizontal plane. Now, engineers associate sounds with individual objects in a 3D space, such as bullets whizzing by or tires peeling out during a high-speed chase. The information associated with these individual sounds (objects) are deciphered in your AV system and distributed through a combination of speakers to reproduce that sound in your home. As with when surround sound became popular, the only way to enjoy this advanced immersive audio system is to find content that is encoded with the technology. This does ultimately mean replacing your DVD/Blu-ray collection, but at a slow, affordable pace, considering content is slowly transitioning to being remastered for this system. Studios are releasing Blu-rays and other content in this format, so it is important to keep a pulse on the immersive audio trend and find the appropriate films that will cater to your new audio system. As immersive audio technology makes its way into homes, it is also important to ensure consumers are informed and educated on how best to implement it — some products will need to be purchased, while others are already a part of your current system. As you search for sources, it is crucial to identify the correct technology professional so you're not oversold on products or services and so you have the new technology integrated into your home effectively, both from a cost and functionality standpoint. It is no doubt that it is an exciting time for the home theater enthusiast as the landscape in this industry continues to grow in such innovative and experiential ways. Content, such as films and concerts, will continue to be recorded or remastered in immersive formats like DTS Neo:X, Dolby Atmos and Auro-3D. In my next article, I will take you on a tour of these three formats that are bringing the immersive audio experience to life and tell you a bit more about what the future holds. Follow all of the Expert Voices issues and debates — and become part of the discussion — on Facebook, Twitter and Google+. The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher. This version of the article was originally published on Tomsguide.com. Copyright 2016 LiveScience, a Purch company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


News Article | January 5, 2016
Site: phys.org

LG Electronics fired an opening salvo with a new OLED television no thicker than four stacked credit cards. The South Korean consumer electronics colossus opened a packed day of press conferences at the annual tech extravaganza in Las Vegas with a line-up that included an OLED Signature panel touted as "quite literally, a picture on glass." The television measures an unprecedented 2.57 mm, LG Electronics USA marketing vice president David VanderWaal said during an on-stage presentation. "Our passion and commitment for OLED has never been stronger," VanderWaal said. "OLED TV is already recognized as the best TV ever." OLED displays have pixels that emit their own light, while pixels in LCD TVs are illuminated by backlights. OLED screens boast deeper blacks, allowing for a wider range of color than LCD displays. They also tend to come with higher price tags. LCD televisions remain "the king of screens" with sizes trending up, according to the Consumer Technology Association, the trade group behind CES. One in every five televisions sold this year is expected to be 50 inches or more, measured diagonally, and feature ultra high-definition 4K resolution. LG was among the TV makers here introducing new models that will come with a freshly minted Ultra-High Definition Premium Certification signalling that they meet standards freshly established by an alliance representing manufacturers, technology companies and studios creating content. "The criteria established by this broad cross-section of the Ultra HD ecosystem enables the delivery of a revolutionary in-home experience," UHD Alliance chairman Hanno Basse said in a release. "And, the Ultra HD Premium logo gives consumers a single, identifying mark to seek out so they can purchase with confidence." Analysts told AFP they expected adoption of 4K ultra-high definition televisions to pick up speed this year as prices get in reach of more consumers and the displays become marketplace norms. LG built Dolby Vision technology into its new televisions. "Dolby Vision creates a picture so lifelike you will forget you are looking at a TV screen," Dolby Labs senior vice president Giles Baker said during the presentation. Dolby Vision has been used in major films including box-office record-breaker "Star Wars: The Force Awakens," according to Giles. The LG television line-up included "Super UHD" LCD displays as slim as 6.6 mm and a new flagship 8K television measuring 98 inches diagonally. Later in the day, leading television maker Samsung unveiled a new line of ultra-high-definition LCD televisions capable of not only streaming games or shows from the Internet but able to serve as command centers for smart home devices, from locks and lights to thermostats and appliances. Samsung Electronics visual display business president Hyun Suk Kim pulled back the curtain on new SUHD Quantum Dot televisions that he said marked the "start of a new era of TV." "This year we are focused on bringing the television experience into the future," Samsung Electronics America executive Dave Das said. "The new SUHD TV is a giant leap forward in time." New models have software designed to better consolidate traditional and online content, and remote controls that automatically detect and command accessories with no set-up needed. Samsung's new SUHD televisions will also allow people to play more than 500 video games, including blockbusters such as "Assassin's Creed" streamed online in partnership with Sony's PlayStation Now service, without needing consoles. The TVs will also act as command centers in smart homes by incorporating technology from Silicon Valley start-up SmartThings, which Samsung bought in 2014, allowing them to control devices synched to the platform. "I think this is really a big step forward for opening up the market," SmartThings founder and chief Alexander Hawkinson told AFP. "You can have a smart home basically for free as a starting point; it is pretty amazing." SmartThings is based on open standards, letting tens of thousands of developers tailor applications to work with the platform. "In 2016, we're going beyond anything we've done before to offer a remarkable synergy of design, engineering and craftsmanship," said Hyun Suk Kim. Sony unveiled a new flagship LCD televisions and boasted that it is ramping the quality of displays with "high dynamic range" technology that appeared to be a rage at CES. The Japanese consumer electronics and entertainment colossus said it has also broadened its line of ultra-slim Bravia televisions. Sony also introduced an Ultra 4K streaming service that taps into the company's film and television library and is optimized for Bravia models.


Hua K.-L.,National Taiwan University of Science and Technology | Chiu G.-M.,National Taiwan University of Science and Technology | Chin T.-L.,National Taiwan University of Science and Technology | Pao H.-K.,National Taiwan University of Science and Technology | And 2 more authors.
2013 International Conference on Computing, Networking and Communications, ICNC 2013 | Year: 2013

ABSTRACT Peer-to-peer (P2P) media streaming systems have recently become a major type of application traffic. In these applications, an important issue has been the block scheduling problem, which determines how each peer exchanges the data blocks from others. Scalable streaming in P2P networks has recently been proposed to address the heterogeneity of the network environment. In this paper, we first define a priority function for each block according to the block's significance for video content. The block scheduling problem is then transformed to an optimization problem that maximizes the priority sum of the delivered video blocks. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm offers excellent performance for P2P streaming service. © 2013 IEEE.


News Article | December 8, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Entomo Inc., a leading provider of channel revenue management software and services, today announced its joint marketing and reseller partnership with MTC Performance (MTC), a leading provider of sales incentive management solutions. Customers will now have access to best-in-class cloud applications spanning from channel data management through incentive program payments, with associated analytics and dashboards to gauge program performance and ROI. “Global customers come to us for our enterprise-class toolset for creating and managing sales channel incentive programs, for both partner companies and individual sales reps,” said George Kriza, founder and CEO of MTC Performance. “We manage their SPIFF and loyalty programs, but they also need MDF and Rebate programs. Entomo’s best-in-class capabilities in managing marketing programs and the overall robustness of their channel revenue management platform provides a perfect complement to our solutions.” “Many of our customers need sales incentive management solutions for channel sales reps,” said Sanjoy Chatterji, founder and CEO, Entomo. “MTC is a well-known leader in this space. We’re thrilled to partner with them to offer a best-in-class comprehensive channel revenue management solution to a much wider audience.” The result of the partnership is a uniquely transparent solution that consolidates the collaborative, transactional, accrual, payment and business intelligence aspects of channel revenue management in one seamless offering. About MTC Performance MTC Performance is a leading innovator of sales incentive management solutions for top Fortune 500 and growing middle market companies to more efficiently deliver exciting, effective programs that inspire success and reward results. We combine our high tech products with our high touch service to guide our clients, manage their programs and achieve their goals. Global customers include Eaton, Epson, ESAB, Ingram Micro, Kaspersky Lab and WatchGuard. About Entomo Entomo is a leading provider of cloud-based channel management software and services. We help businesses effectively manage distribution channel complexity to capture unrealized revenue, reduce costs, improve partner performance and collaboration and ensure compliance at all levels. Entomo’s SmartHub® is the industry’s most flexible, scalable, and comprehensive enterprise channel management platform, enabling automation and simplification of all channel-related workflows, processes and financial activities. Entomo supports the channel management activities for global enterprises including Brother International, Broadcom, Dolby Labs, Elo Touch Solutions, Keysight Technologies, Kingston Technology, Microsemi Corporation, Qorvo Inc., Sling Media/EchoStar, and United Technologies. Entomo is headquartered in Bellevue, Washington, with offices in the Silicon Valley, Asia, and Europe.


Daly S.,University of Utah | Xu N.,Group of Snapchat Inc. | Crenshaw J.,Dolby Labs | Zunjarrao V.J.,Microsoft
SMPTE Motion Imaging Journal | Year: 2015

There are well-known observations of movie content being displayed at different frame rates. Although the terms are not consistent across the industry, four main degradations are observed of the signal as compared to nonsampled motion (i.e., real-world motion): (1) nonsmooth motion, (2) false multiple edges, (3) flickering, and (4) motion blur. In natural imagery, all four of these effects are generally visible at typical movie frame rates. The spatiotemporal window of visibility has proved successful in describing when motion looks distorted from the realworld smooth motion. However, that model predicts only detection performance and does not address the appearance or magnitude of motion distortions. In addition, well-known image capture and display parameters are also involved with frame rate questions, such as exposure duty cycle (angle), object speed, and object contrast. There are also known interactions with brightness and contrast, which are also generally linked in the end-to-end system. For example, the Ferry-Porter law1 of psychophysics indicates the temporal frequency bandwidth of vision increases with increasing adapting luminance. We aimed to isolate the nonsmooth motion component of judder in a psychophysical study by using fundamental test signals, such as the Gabor signal. Two-interval forced choice methodology was used to generate interval scales of the magnitude of judder, or judderness. Results are presented for the viewer assessment of the magnitude of judder/judderness as a function of these key parameters tested in isolation. Copyright © 2015 by the SMPTE.


News Article | November 24, 2015
Site: www.fastcompany.com

Working on making Buffer an inclusive place where all kinds of people feel they belong and thrive is one of my favorite things. It’s a unique time to be working on diversity goals at a tech startup. On the one hand, there is quite a bit of work to do to make the strides we’d all like to make. On the other hand, there is so much hope and so many cool innovations, programs, and even tools that can help move us toward where we want to be. We’ve shared a lot of our thoughts, strategies and mistakes so far. As I begin to embark on making diversity a bigger part of my job (Potential future title: Belonging Booster. What do you think?) I wanted to check out what some other tech companies are working on when it comes to inclusivity. My research journey took me all the way from the NFL to the symphony orchestra as I discovered tech companies are pulling inspiration from many different areas. Here are seven cool inclusivity tactics that my investigation turned up. Who’s using it: Facebook and Pinterest What does tech have in common with the National Football League? At least one element: the Rooney Rule. Introduced by the NFL in 2003, the Rooney Rule (named for Pittsburgh Steelers owner Dan Rooney, who headed the league’s diversity committee) is simple. It requires teams to interview at least one minority candidate for every head-coaching and general manager vacancy. This change quickly increased the NFL’s number of minority hires from 6% to 22%. Companies like Facebook and Pinterest have adopted their own versions of the Rooney Rule, often translating it to the idea that at least one woman and one underrepresented minority be considered for every open position (sometimes, every open senior position). Who’s using it: Twitter and Pinterest 17% of all Americans are Latino, 13% of all Americans are black, 6% of all Americans are Asian, and 62% of Americans are white. 50% of Americans identify as male, and the other 50% as female. Tech companies’ numbers generally don’t reflect these percentages very closely. Pinterest acknowledged this after releasing these demographic numbers: So Pinterest did something pretty unique and transparent to address this. From its blog post: Following suit was Twitter; here are its goals for 2016: Transparently sharing specific inclusion goals feels like a great method to create accountability and honesty around how things are going. According to Fortune, LinkedIn is among the most gender-diverse of high-profile technology companies—at the end of 2014, almost half of LinkedIn’s employees were non-white. How did it get there? One clue might be in this interview with Erica Lockheimer, LinkedIn’s director of engineering growth and women in tech. Erica explains that 20% of her time—and therefore a portion of her salary and bonus—is tied to LinkedIn’s overall diversity goals. Several others in management have a similar arrangement, and at least another 50 employees have dedicated 5% of their time—and a portion of their overall annual pay—toward working on diversity at LinkedIn through things like unconscious bias training and "acts of inclusion." 20% time is a cool strategy because it takes the mission outside the realm of just a select few at an organization and makes it something everyone can work toward, together. Here’s a cool strategy from Google: the search giant is embedding engineers at historically black colleges and universities, where they teach, mentor, and advise. Google has software engineers in residence at Howard University in Washington, D.C., Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia, Fisk University in Nashville, and Spelman and Morehouse Colleges in Atlanta. Googlers teach courses and also train students on skills like how to send a professional email and how to master a technical engineering job interview. Recently, Slack added a new way for developers to connect to the app, via the "Add to Slack" button. Quite a few users noticed that the hand in the illustration wasn’t the "usual" look for design: The seemingly small detail of skin color in the launch graphics resonated with many users. Diogenes Brito, the designer on the project, wrote about the decision beautifully: Seeing yourself recognized and included in design is a powerful feeling, and Slack recognizes this in multiple ways: For a small start in this direction, check out this great connection of stock photos of tech women of color. (You might recognize the top image in this post!) Who’s using it: Facebook, Google, and others Our brains aren’t so great at making rational decisions. There are literally hundreds of cognitive biases that trick us every day. Here are just a few: How can we retrain our flawed brains? Some say a start is to be aware of our biases. Companies like Google and Facebook are working hard on unconscious bias training for its teams, and sharing some great resources with all of us. (Seriously, both those links are gold!) Speaking of unconscious bias, here’s how orchestras in the United States uncovered and worked through one of their own biases. As late as 1970, the top five orchestras in the U.S. had fewer than 5% women. By 1997, that number was up to 30%! What changed? Orchestras began using , where performers stayed behind a screen as they played, unseen by the judges. (Kinda like TV’s The Voice). According to a 2001 study, blind orchestra auditions the probability that a woman would advance from preliminary rounds by 50%. Could blind auditions work for tech, too? The startup Gap Jumpers makes software that creates a blind audition conducted via computer. Companies like Dolby Labs and Mozilla have already signed on to try this unique method. We’re excited to explore many of these strategies at Buffer soon, and will share with you how it goes. How are you working on bringing more diverse perspectives to your team, or to make your workplace more inclusive for all? I’d love to hear what strategies you’re thinking of or working on, and any thoughts you might have for Buffer as we work on building a more diverse team. This article originally appeared on Buffer and is reprinted with permission.


Farrell S.,Dolby Labs.
SMPTE 2015 Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition, SMPTE 2015 | Year: 2015

How does one become 'the best'? You run faster; jump further; eat the most hot dogs. In these examples the winner is objective. They are the Usain Bolts, the Joey Chestnuts. But how do you define 'the best' when dealing with subjective matter? Milk chocolate or dark chocolate? Rec.2020 and 1,000 cd/m2 or P3 with 4,000? In terms of image quality, both consumers and creators want to know what makes 'the best'. Consumers want a number or a letter grade, and creators and engineers want to know how to make that image or television rate the highest. It comes down to creating a metric that factors in all image attributes and weighting them by how each are valued by consumers. We will discuss the challenges faced in creating such a metric, and our study that compared image quality dimensions such as dynamic range, color primaries, bit depth, and contrast. © 2015 Society of Motion Picture & Television Engineers® (SMPTE®).

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