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OAKLAND, Calif., May 08, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- DNV GL’s Karen Conover has been recognized by A Word About Wind in the Women’s Power List: The Top 100 Women Working in Wind, ranking at number 18. The report aims to celebrate exceptional women around the world contributing to the continued growth and success of the wind industry. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/6a5d4464-0ffe-444b-99e9-0dda676b6c5c The report is the first of its kind, with rankings compiled by the A Word About Wind editorial team in collaboration with an impartial senior advisory board.  Karen Conover’s position on the list testifies her recognition as thought leader in the American wind energy market. Currently being vice president at DNV GL – Energy, Conover has been a member of the American Wind Energy Association’s board of directors since 1997. She is a former president of the AWEA Board, has served as chair of WINDPOWER and is the current chair of the Membership and Awards Committees. She also serves on the board of Women of Wind Energy. Conover has worked in the wind industry for more than 25 years in multiple executive positions. In 1994, she founded and served as CEO of Global Energy Concepts, an engineering and technology consultancy that specialized in the analysis, design, evaluation, testing and management of wind energy systems and projects. When GEC was acquired by DNV in 2008, Conover became the director of its wind energy operations, before becoming vice president of DNV GL in 2012. “Karen is one of the true pioneers of wind energy in the US, promoting a wind vision way ahead of most of us who are active in the business today,” said Carole Barbeau, DNV GL president of energy advisory for the Americas region. “Since she joined DNV GL, Karen has made a significant impact on our company, not only from her leadership and strategic mindset, but also by sharing her knowledge and passion for the wind industry.” The report was released on March 7, 2017 in honor of International Women’s Day and in partnership with renewable energy finance specialist Green Giraffe. Each woman selected was first nominated by her peers and then assessed and ranked by an independent judging panel made up of senior industry representatives. “It is no secret that there is a gender imbalance in the wind industry,” A Word About Wind wrote on their website about the report. “This is a trait that wind shares with other parts of the energy and financial services industries, and we don’t pretend we can change that. What we can do, however, is mark the achievements of the top women working in wind – and hopefully inspire more talented individuals to enter the sector.” For more information and to obtain a copy of the Women’s Power List report, please visit: http://www.awordaboutwind.com/reports/wind-industry-report-womens-power-list-2017/. DNV GL Driven by our purpose of safeguarding life, property and the environment, DNV GL enables organizations to advance the safety and sustainability of their business. We provide classification and technical assurance along with software and independent expert advisory services to the maritime, oil & gas and energy industries. We also provide certification services to customers across a wide range of industries. Operating in more than 100 countries, our professionals are dedicated to helping our customers make the world safer, smarter and greener. In the Energy Industry In DNV GL we unite the strengths of DNV, KEMA, Garrad Hassan and GL Renewables Certification. DNV GL’s 2,500 energy experts support customers around the globe in delivering a safe, reliable, efficient and sustainable energy supply. We deliver world-renowned testing, certification and advisory services to the energy value chain including renewables and energy efficiency. Our expertise spans onshore and offshore wind power, solar, conventional generation, transmission and distribu­tion, smart grids and sustainable energy use, as well as energy markets and regulations. Our testing, certification and advisory services are delivered independent from each other.


OAKLAND, Calif., May 08, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- DNV GL’s Karen Conover has been recognized by A Word About Wind in the Women’s Power List: The Top 100 Women Working in Wind, ranking at number 18. The report aims to celebrate exceptional women around the world contributing to the continued growth and success of the wind industry. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/6a5d4464-0ffe-444b-99e9-0dda676b6c5c The report is the first of its kind, with rankings compiled by the A Word About Wind editorial team in collaboration with an impartial senior advisory board.  Karen Conover’s position on the list testifies her recognition as thought leader in the American wind energy market. Currently being vice president at DNV GL – Energy, Conover has been a member of the American Wind Energy Association’s board of directors since 1997. She is a former president of the AWEA Board, has served as chair of WINDPOWER and is the current chair of the Membership and Awards Committees. She also serves on the board of Women of Wind Energy. Conover has worked in the wind industry for more than 25 years in multiple executive positions. In 1994, she founded and served as CEO of Global Energy Concepts, an engineering and technology consultancy that specialized in the analysis, design, evaluation, testing and management of wind energy systems and projects. When GEC was acquired by DNV in 2008, Conover became the director of its wind energy operations, before becoming vice president of DNV GL in 2012. “Karen is one of the true pioneers of wind energy in the US, promoting a wind vision way ahead of most of us who are active in the business today,” said Carole Barbeau, DNV GL president of energy advisory for the Americas region. “Since she joined DNV GL, Karen has made a significant impact on our company, not only from her leadership and strategic mindset, but also by sharing her knowledge and passion for the wind industry.” The report was released on March 7, 2017 in honor of International Women’s Day and in partnership with renewable energy finance specialist Green Giraffe. Each woman selected was first nominated by her peers and then assessed and ranked by an independent judging panel made up of senior industry representatives. “It is no secret that there is a gender imbalance in the wind industry,” A Word About Wind wrote on their website about the report. “This is a trait that wind shares with other parts of the energy and financial services industries, and we don’t pretend we can change that. What we can do, however, is mark the achievements of the top women working in wind – and hopefully inspire more talented individuals to enter the sector.” For more information and to obtain a copy of the Women’s Power List report, please visit: http://www.awordaboutwind.com/reports/wind-industry-report-womens-power-list-2017/. DNV GL Driven by our purpose of safeguarding life, property and the environment, DNV GL enables organizations to advance the safety and sustainability of their business. We provide classification and technical assurance along with software and independent expert advisory services to the maritime, oil & gas and energy industries. We also provide certification services to customers across a wide range of industries. Operating in more than 100 countries, our professionals are dedicated to helping our customers make the world safer, smarter and greener. In the Energy Industry In DNV GL we unite the strengths of DNV, KEMA, Garrad Hassan and GL Renewables Certification. DNV GL’s 2,500 energy experts support customers around the globe in delivering a safe, reliable, efficient and sustainable energy supply. We deliver world-renowned testing, certification and advisory services to the energy value chain including renewables and energy efficiency. Our expertise spans onshore and offshore wind power, solar, conventional generation, transmission and distribu­tion, smart grids and sustainable energy use, as well as energy markets and regulations. Our testing, certification and advisory services are delivered independent from each other.


A new recommended practice will provide industry guidance on optimal collection and assessment of site conditions which will lead to time, cost and risk reduction in offshore wind farm designing HAMBURG, 18-May-2017 — /EuropaWire/ — DNV GL invites industry partners to start a Joint Industry Project (JIP) for improving the collection and assessment of site conditions data for offshore wind farms. Aiming to increase the efficiency of collecting site conditions, the new JIP will work with stakeholders from across the wind industry. The knowledge generated from the JIP is planned to be ultimately incorporated in a DNV GL recommended practice. The design of an offshore wind farm is dependent on the quality of the calculated site conditions used to derive the design parameters. To achieve an optimal quality in data collection and assessment, extensive and costly investigations are needed at a very early stage of the development, long before final investment decision is made. A recommended practice will allow stakeholders to improve their planning, investigation and design. “The development of this recommended practice will create an industrial consensus on an agreed set of practices to follow for the analysis of the system and its validation. This will allow stakeholders to increase transparency and reduce the risk in the early phases of the development,” says Kim Moerk, Executive Vice President for Renewables Certification at DNV GL. Incorporating the experience and objectives of stakeholders along the wind energy value chain will add significant value for all parties involved. They will be able to contribute and influence the development of the assessment criteria to ensure their concerns are covered, practices are acknowledged and the objectives of all stakeholders are met. The involvement provides early access and insight into the results, ensuring participants are best prepared for its implementation. Companies interested in joining the JIP can contact the project manager Helena Hunt via Helena.Hunt@dnvgl.com. About DNV GL Driven by our purpose of safeguarding life, property and the environment, DNV GL enables organizations to advance the safety and sustainability of their business. We provide classification and technical assurance along with software and independent expert advisory services to the maritime, oil & gas and energy industries. We also provide certification services to customers across a wide range of industries. Operating in more than 100 countries, our professionals are dedicated to helping our customers make the world safer, smarter and greener. DNV GL in the Energy industry In DNV GL we unite the strengths of DNV, KEMA, Garrad Hassan, and GL Renewables Certification. DNV GL’s 2,500 energy experts support customers around the globe in delivering a safe, reliable, efficient, and sustainable energy supply. We deliver world-renowned testing, certification and advisory services to the energy value chain including renewables and energy efficiency. Our expertise spans onshore and offshore wind power, solar, conventional generation, transmission and distribu¬tion, smart grids, and sustainable energy use, as well as energy markets and regulations. Our testing, certification and advisory services are delivered independent from each other. Learn more at www.dnvgl.com/energy


Anil Srivastava, CEO of Leclanché, said: "There is a huge opportunity for marine vessels across the world to reduce their harmful emissions and cut their operating costs by leveraging battery storage technology. This is why we developed the MRS and we are delighted that it is the world's first such solution to receive type approval from DNV-GL. This certification opens up a very exciting and substantial global market for Leclanché." Antti Väyrynen, Vice President E-Transportation, Leclanché, added: "Type approval is an important catalyst to our market growth as it significantly simplifies the certification process of each vessel that uses the Leclanché MRS." Safety was one of Leclanché's key focus areas when developing the MRS. The company performed multiple fire propagation tests to ensure that the battery system performed safely, in even the most extreme situations. With the requirement to pass close to 20 separate tests, the DNV-GL certification process sets the benchmark for battery system safety in marine applications. The E-ferry will be launched in late 2017 sailing between the island Aeroe (Ærø) and the mainland. The emission-free, passenger and car ferry will be able to sail a record 60 nautical miles (110 km) on a single charge. The E-ferry is an EU Horizon 2020 project, the EU's €77 billion transport and energy research and innovation programme from 2014 to 2020. In Scandinavia, there is the potential to convert nearly 200 ferry routes to electric within the next decade; Europe-wide over 1,000 ferries could be converted. The Leclanché MRS could also be used in other marine applications including hybridization and peak shaving of auxiliary loads of cargo vessels and cruise ships. In 2015, the global marine hybrid propulsion market was valued at US$2.6bn. It is expected to reach US$5.2bn by 2024, representing a CAGR of 8.2 per cent from 2016 to 2024. Leclanché is one of the world's leading, vertically integrated, energy storage solution providers. It delivers a wide range of energy storage solutions for homes, small offices, industry, electricity grids, as well as solutions for transport such as electric buses and marine applications. Established in 1909, Leclanché has been a trusted provider of battery energy storage solutions for over 100 years. Leclanché is listed on the Swiss stock exchange, and is the only listed, pure-play, energy storage company in the world. Disclaimer This press release contains certain forward-looking statements relating to Leclanché's business, which can be identified by terminology such as "strategic", "proposes", "to introduce", "will", "planned", "expected", "commitment", "expects", "set", "preparing", "plans", "estimates", "aims", "would", "potential", "awaiting", "estimated", "proposal", or similar expressions, or by expressed or implied discussions regarding the ramp up of Leclanché's production capacity, potential applications for existing products, or regarding potential future revenues from any such products, or potential future sales or earnings of Leclanché or any of its business units. You should not place undue reliance on these statements. Such forward-looking statements reflect the current views of Leclanché regarding future events, and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual results to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such statements. There can be no guarantee that Leclanché's products will achieve any particular revenue levels. Nor can there be any guarantee that Leclanché, or any of the business units, will achieve any particular financial results. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/leclanches-new-marine-battery-system-is-the-worlds-first-approved-under-revised-dnv-gl-requirements-300457215.html


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« BioSolar begins engineering phase of its work on new Si alloy anode for high-capacity Li-ion batteries | Main | GM Maven expanding car-sharing operations in NYC » Leclanché SA announced the market launch of Leclanché Marine Rack System (MRS), a modular, Lithium-ion battery system for marine vessels. Leclanché MRS is the first marine battery system of its type approved by international certification body DNV-GL under revised rules issued in October 2015. Leclanché will use the MRS on the E-ferry in Denmark, the world’s largest, 100% electric ferry by battery capacity, equipped with a 4.3 MWh Leclanché Lithium-ion battery and scheduled for launch later this year. (Earlier post.) The E-ferry is a single ended, drive-through Ro-Ro passenger ferry with one continuous main deck for trailers and cars. Capacity is 31 cars or 5 trucks on open deck, with 147 passengers in winter and 198 passengers in summer. There is a huge opportunity for marine vessels across the world to reduce their harmful emissions and cut their operating costs by leveraging battery storage technology. This is why we developed the MRS and we are delighted that it is the world’s first such solution to receive type approval from DNV-GL. This certification opens up a very exciting and substantial global market for Leclanché. Safety was one of Leclanché’s key focus areas when developing the MRS. The company performed multiple fire propagation tests to ensure that the battery system performed safely, in even the most extreme situations. With the requirement to pass close to 20 separate tests, the DNV-GL certification process sets the benchmark for battery system safety in marine applications. The E-ferry will be launched in late 2017 sailing between the island Ærø and the mainland. The emission-free, passenger and car ferry will be able to sail a record 60 nautical miles (110 km) on a single charge. The E-ferry is an EU Horizon 2020 project, the EU’s €77-billion transport and energy research and innovation programme from 2014 to 2020. In Scandinavia, there is the potential to convert nearly 200 ferry routes to electric within the next decade; Europe-wide more than 1,000 ferries could be converted. The Leclanché MRS could also be used in other marine applications including hybridization and peak shaving of auxiliary loads of cargo vessels and cruise ships.


Leclanché SA has now launched its modular, lithium-ion electric ferry battery system onto the market. The new system — dubbed the Leclanché Marine Rack System (MRS), and the first of its type to be approved by the international certification body DNV-GL under revised rules dating to October 2015 — will be used on the new “E-ferry” slated to launch in Denmark later this year. Once launched, this E-ferry — to travel a route between the island Ærø and the Danish mainland — will represent the world’s biggest by battery capacity (it will be outfitted with a 4.3 megawatt-hour/MWh battery-pack). Commenting on the new product launch, Leclanché CEO Anil Srivastava stated: “There is a huge opportunity for marine vessels across the world to reduce their harmful emissions and cut their operating costs by leveraging battery storage technology. This is why we developed the MRS and we are delighted that it is the world’s first such solution to receive type approval from DNV-GL. This certification opens up a very exciting and substantial global market for Leclanché.” Green Car Congress provides more on the E-ferry slated to launch later this year in Denmark (using Leclanché’s battery system): “The E-ferry is a single ended, drive-through Ro-Ro passenger ferry with one continuous main deck for trailers and cars. Capacity is 31 cars or 5 trucks on open deck, with 147 passengers in winter and 198 passengers in summer. … The emission-free, passenger and car ferry will be able to sail a record 60 nautical miles (110 km) on a single charge. The E-ferry is an EU Horizon 2020 project, the EU’s €77-billion transport and energy research and innovation programme from 2014 to 2020.” As a final note here, the new MRS battery system was reportedly designed primarily with safety in mind — which would figure when considering the dangers accompanying 4.3 MWh worth of lithium-ion battery capacity. To this end, the company reportedly passed around 20 DNV-GL certification process tests related to fires and other dangers. Check out our new 93-page EV report. Join us for an upcoming Cleantech Revolution Tour conference! Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech daily newsletter or weekly newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter. James Ayre 's background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy. You can follow his work on Google+.


« Porsche Digital, Inc. opens location in Silicon Valley | Main | IAV develops new close-coupled diesel exhaust gas aftertreatment system for improved emissions reduction » A new study by the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT) estimates heavy fuel oil (HFO) use, HFO carriage, the use and carriage of other fuels, black carbon (BC) emissions, and emissions of other air and climate pollutants for the year 2015, with projections to 2020 and 2025. According to the report, potentially large increases in BC emissions may occur in the Arctic, further exacerbating warming, if ships are diverted from the Panama and Suez canals to take advantage of shorter routes to and from Asia, Europe, and North America. If even a small percentage (1%–2%) of large cargo vessels are diverted from the Panama and Suez Canals through the Arctic over the next decade, BC emissions could rise significantly—jumping up to 46% from 2015 to 2025. Dwindling sea ice is opening new shipping routes through the Arctic and shipping activity in the Arctic is expected to rise as oil and gas development increases and as ships take advantage of shorter trans-Arctic routes from Asia to Europe and North America. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA, 2014a) estimates that 75% of Arctic sea ice volume has been lost since the 1980s. The Northwest Passage (NWP) and Northern Sea Route (NSR) … are the two most economically advantageous routes for trans-Arctic shipping. The trip between Shanghai and Europe is shortened by about a third when the NSR is taken in lieu of the traditional route through the Suez Canal. Similarly, the trip from Shanghai to New York City also is shortened by a third when taking the NWP instead of the path through the Panama Canal. Shorter distances result in fuel, labor, and time savings. The ICCT report uses exactEarth satellite Automatic Identification System (AIS) data along with ship characteristic data from IHS Fairplay to examine shipping in three Arctic regions: (1) the Geographic Arctic (above 58.95 ˚N); (2) the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Arctic as defined in the Polar Code; and (3) the US Arctic, defined as the portion of the US exclusive economic zone (EEZ) within the IMO Arctic. The report found that shipping within the Arctic as defined by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) consumed an estimated 436,000 tonnes of fuel and emitted 193 tonnes of black carbon in 2015.  This is almost quadruple the most recent (2012, by DNV) estimate. HFO was the most consumed marine fuel in the Arctic in 2015. In the IMO Arctic, HFO represented nearly 57% of the nearly half million tonnes (t) of fuel consumed by ships, followed by distillate (43%); almost no liquefied natural gas (LNG) was consumed in this area. General cargo vessels consumed the most HFO in the IMO Arctic, using 66,000 t, followed by oil tankers (43,000 t), and cruise ships (25,000 t). HFO also dominated fuel carriage, in tonnes, and fuel transport, in tonne-nautical miles (t-nm) in the Arctic in 2015. Although only 42% of ships in the IMO Arctic operated on HFO in 2015, these ships accounted for 76% of fuel carried and 56% of fuel transported in this region. Specifically, bulk carriers, container ships, oil tankers, general cargo vessels, and fishing vessels dominated HFO carriage and transport in the IMO Arctic, together accounting for more than 75% of HFO carried and transported in the IMO Arctic in 2015. Considering the quantity of fuel these vessels carry on board and the distances they travel each year, these ships may pose a higher risk for HFO spills than others. the ICCT team concluded. Among the other key findings of the report: Some of the emissions growth between 2012 and 2015 can be attributed to increased vessel traffic, with satellites detecting roughly double the number of ship miles traveled in 2015 compared to 2012.  Emissions from ships operating in areas that were previously ice locked and inaccessible to marine traffic can be clearly seen in 2015, particularly on the Northern Sea Route off of Russia’s coast. Estimates of HFO use and BC emissions is heavily dependent upon the definition of the Arctic.  IMO’s narrow definition of the Arctic, which excludes significant coastal areas around Iceland and Norway, excludes 85% of ship traffic, 90% of fuel use, and 85% of BC emissions from shipping in the Geographic Arctic north of 59 degrees latitude. By 2025, emissions of CO and black carbon by ships in the Arctic are projected to increase 5% to 50%, depending upon the level of ship diversions from the Panama and Suez canals through the Arctic as well as the geographic definition of the Arctic used. While less than half of the ships in the Arctic use HFO, it represents 75% of the fuel onboard ships in the Arctic because larger ships, with larger fuel tanks, tend to use HFO instead of cleaner distillate fuels. The majority of HFO carriage in the Geographic Arctic is attributable to ships flagged to non-Arctic states with major ship registries like Panama, the Marshall Islands, Liberia, Malta, and the Bahamas.  This points to the need for an international standard on HFO use and carriage at the IMO, the authors said. The authors suggested that several policy alternatives could reduce the dual risks of air pollution and fuel oil spills from ships in the Arctic, including regional emission control policies; restricting the use of HFO, the carriage of HFO, or both; and regulating BC emissions regionally or globally. Explicitly restricting the use and carriage of HFO in the Arctic would greatly reduce the risks of HFO oil spills and would also reduce air pollution, including BC, provided ships operate on distillate, LNG, or other alternative fuels. An even stronger approach would be to prohibit the use of petroleum-based fuels (e.g., HFO and distillate), which would require a complete shift to cleaner fuels (e.g., LNG, fuel cells), albeit at substantial cost to existing fleets. Finally, Arctic BC emissions could be addressed through regulations that either establish new emission standards for marine engines, require the use of low- or zero-BC fuels, or mandate the use of BC reduction devices such as diesel particulate filters. Such a policy also may encourage a shift toward fuels that are less damaging than HFO when spilled. … Policies could be implemented at the global, regional, national, or subnational scales. Consensus policies that apply specifically to the Arctic region could be effective because ships registered to Arctic states, particularly Russia, account for the majority of HFO use, carriage, and BC emissions in the Arctic. However, because the diversion of ships from traditional trade routes in favor of trans-Arctic routes is likely as the Arctic becomes ice-free for longer periods, policies that apply to the global fleet, or ships intending to sail in the Arctic, are more attractive. Global policies are also desirable given that emissions of BC outside of the IMO Arctic can be, and are, transported northward. Thus, global policies that prohibit the use and carriage of HFO and reduce BC from marine engines will help ensure that the impacts on the Arctic environment from ships are meaningfully reduced.


News Article | May 6, 2017
Site: www.materialstoday.com

Fibermaq, a Brazilian composite molding equipment company, had its operation recertified under quality standard ISO 9001:2008. A holder of the certificate since 2011, the company was audited by the local subsidiary of DNV/GL, an accredited body headquartered in Norway. ‘This was our second complete recertification, even though our company is audited every year,’ said Christian de Andrade, Fibermaq director. The company is already working on complying with the updated ISO version (2015). This story is reprinted from material from Fibermaq, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.fastcompany.com

For every threat to the planet, there’s an opportunity for a company to step in with solutions. For every risk to humanity, there’s a potential business model and boost to the bottom line. In the spirit of this risk-to-opportunity ethos, a new website called the Global Opportunity Explorer contains business solutions for coping with global challenges, from water scarcity to hunger to urban transportation. The hope is that companies will use the site and see dollar signs where once they might just have seen intractable problems. “With this platform we’re hoping to connect bigger companies with entrepreneurs who oftentimes have an invention that can be interesting for them,” says Laura Hammershoy, director of strategic innovation at Sustainia, a Copenhagen-based think tank and consultancy, one of three groups behind the initiative. “For companies, it’s not about greening the business anymore or reporting or risk management. It’s should be about innovating and capturing the opportunities that are out there.” The risk-to-opportunity platform is organized according to the United Nations’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals. Click on SDG 2, which calls for an end to hunger, and you get solutions like bio-fertilizers that improve soils and raise agricultural yields. Click on SDG 6, covering clean water and sanitation, and you get ideas like a shower that recycles and cleans water after use. The idea is that if you’re a business looking to make your practices more sustainable, there are ideas–and potential partners here–in whatever area you operate in. Hammershoy’s personal favorites include Ennesys, a French company creating building facades containing micro-algae. Fed by nutrients and wastewater, the plants give off heat and help cut building running costs. Another idea features the Econyl Regeneration System, which takes old fish nets and carpets and creates fresh nylon yarn. A third comes from Johannesburg, which in 2014 became the world’s first major city to issue a “green bond” to finance its climate mitigation investments. The database, which is searchable by market, solution, and SDG, was put together by Sustainia, funded by DNV, a Norwegian engineering firm, and the UN Global Compact, which aims to harness the private sector for development activity. “As I see it, either companies have understood that the demand is so big that there is money to be made by [allowing] people to engage in more sustainable lifestyles, or else they are part of the fossil fuel economy some way or the other, and don’t care about the sustainable transition,” Hammershoy says. She points to example of companies like Seventh Generation, Whole Foods, Patagonia, Siemens, and BASF, which have built businesses around sustainable products and services. Hammershoy argues big business needs to get beyond the defensive crouch of risk management and corporate responsibility initiatives and roll up its sleeves. “This is all about turning risks into opportunities,” she says.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.theengineer.co.uk

Wind power could be used to help recover more oil from offshore fields, thanks to a project investigating the use of floating turbines to power water injection systems. In enhanced oil recovery, water is pumped into a reservoir to increase the pressure, stimulating production and helping to extract more oil from the well. In a project known as WIN WIN, or Wind-powered Water Injection, researchers led by the classification society DNV-GL have been investigating the idea of using a floating wind turbine to generate the electricity needed to power the water injection system, according to project manager Johan Slätte. “There is a big focus in the oil and gas industry at the moment on identifying means of reducing the environmental footprint,” he said. “There is also a drive to give oil and gas operators a means of establishing water injection facilities further from the host platform.” By using floating wind as the power source, operators could locate offshore water injection systems where they are most needed, instead of being governed by their distance from the host platform, Slätte said. The project team have spent the past year developing and evaluating the concept, which consists of a stand-alone system including pumps and basic water treatment, and assessing its technical and commercial feasibility. They have concluded the concept is not only technically feasible, but capable of competing on costs with conventional water injection systems, he said. As a result of this assessment the team, which in the first phase of the project also included ExxonMobil, Nexen Petroleum UK, Statoil and the UK’s Offshore Renewable Energy Catapult amongst others, concluded that wind power could be used to power offshore water injection. In the second stage of the project, which will involve DNV-GL, ExxonMobil, ENI Norge and the Norwegian Research Council, and is expected to last for up to two years, the team will now move on to refine and test the electrical systems used in the concept. This will include physical testing of the electrical systems at DNV-GL’s laboratories at Arnhem, in the Netherlands, to monitor how they perform over time with a variable power input. “Over the next two years we hope to validate some of the questions we have, and do physical testing of the electrical systems, to ensure that it works as we anticipate,” said Slätte. If the tests are successful, the team hopes to move onto a pilot project with a full-scale prototype by 2020. “We see this as an opportunity to bring in a new technology offering a means to extend the lifetime of offshore oil fields, without having to undertake a major conversion of existing platform facilities,” said Slätte.

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