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News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.businessoffashion.com

FRANKFURT, Germany — Adidas AG aims to increase its sales by 40 million pairs of sneakers annually, to more than a half-billion by 2020, largely by appealing to fashion-conscious teens and urban hipsters. At the heart of that effort: a decades-old shoe named after a retired tennis player who lives in South Carolina and hasn’t won a major singles tournament since 1980. The shoe is the Stan Smith, a white-leather number with pale green accents introduced in 1971, the year before Stan Smith (the player, now 70) earned his second and last Grand Slam singles title. Thanks to a well-orchestrated promotional blitz, this unlikely hero has made one of the greatest comebacks in marketing history, from a declining brand popular with suburban dads into a must-have for the ­fashion-savvy. As they rev up an effort to catch Nike Inc., Adidas executives are seeking to replicate parts of the campaign to stoke interest in other shoes. “We wanted to position it anew with fashion designers and trendsetters,” says Arthur Hoeld, who heads Adidas’s brand strategy and business development. “This is part of the concept — to push boundaries, to experiment.” As Adidas was planning the Stan Smith revival about five years ago, the shoe was still selling, though it was showing up more often at discount stores. The feeling around the company was that the model had lost its mojo, but Hoeld and a handful of other executives saw its potential, their confidence bolstered by reports that Phoebe Philo, creative director of the Céline fashion house, had been spotted sporting Stan Smiths at her shows. So Hoeld’s team outlined a campaign designed to look grassroots but which was in fact choreographed from start to finish with a goal of making the shoes de rigueur for people whose parents may be too young to recall the last time Smith played at Centre Court. The first step was counter­intuitive: Adidas pulled the shoe from the market in 2012, leaving customers with the impression the move was permanent. By mid-2013, Stan Smiths were almost impossible to find, prompting angry letters from fans — and spurring Smith and some on Hoeld’s team to question the wisdom of the plan. Late that year, Adidas began shipping a new version to dozens of celebrities it had worked with, including singer A$AP Rocky, designer Alexander Wang, and talk-show host Ellen DeGeneres. The freebies included a personalised touch intended to get the stars to wear them: A drawing of Smith on the tongue was replaced by an image of each recipient. Adidas struck gold in November 2013, when French Vogue featured model Gisele Bündchen sporting nothing but a pair of white socks — and Stan Smiths. About the same time, Adidas released a two-­minute web video featuring actors and sports stars waxing poetic about the sneakers. “People think I’m a shoe,” Smith laments in the clip, recalling that his son once asked, “ ‘Dad, did they name the shoe after you or you after the shoe?’ ” The first new models, priced at about $90, hewed closely to the simplicity of the original, with a white body and a touch of colour on the tongue and heel. In early 2014, Adidas started shipping them to shops catering to hardcore sneaker fans, followed by specialty footwear retailers and, months later, department stores and big-box outlets. Later that year, the company steadily added spinoffs — Stan Smiths in high heels, faux crocodile skin, and honeycomb leather, as well as 10 pairs hand-painted by singer Pharrell Williams and sold at the Colette fashion boutique in Paris for €500 ($545). In 2015, Adidas introduced variants aimed at specific age groups and tastes: simulated ostrich leather, Velcro closures, white with pink accents, blue pony hair heel tabs — even one featuring Kermit the Frog. “We want a consumer to buy three or four or five pairs,” says Eric Liedtke, Adidas’s global brand chief. Adidas aims to increase revenue to more than €25 billion in 2020, from €19.3 billion in 2016. The Stan Smith has been a big help. Sales of the shoe jumped dramatically, to 8 million pairs, in 2015, bringing total sales over the past four decades to more than 50 million. While the company hasn’t released figures, researcher NPD Group Inc. estimates US sales rose fivefold last year. Adidas says sales of its Originals collection, which includes the Stan Smith and another top-selling retro model called the Superstar, popularised by rappers Run-DMC, increased by 80 percent in the US last year, more than three times faster than footwear for team sports such as basketball and American football. Analysts estimate that the company will report a 13 percent increase in first-quarter sales when it provides a financial update Thursday, helped by strong momentum for shoes from the Tubular, NMD and Boost lines. Dipping into the archives isn’t rare in sports fashion. Adidas created the Originals line more than a decade ago, selling everything from shiny ’70s track suits to Gerd Müller soccer shoes. Smaller rival Puma SE went further by collaborating with designers such as Alexander McQueen. As the concept of sports fashion became ubiquitous — Prada SpA, Louis Vuitton, and other brands now sell luxury sneakers — Puma alienated serious athletes looking for shoes aimed more at improving performance on the track than the runway. Over the past decade, Puma’s profit margin has collapsed from more than 25 percent to about 5 percent today. As sales of the Stan Smith and the Superstar start to wane, Adidas plans to pump up other throwbacks from the back of its closet: the 1950 indoor soccer shoe Samba, the suede Gazelle dating to the 1960 Rome Summer Olympics, and the Campus, worn by one of the Beastie Boys on the cover of 1992’s Check Your Head. Adidas has “great retro shoes in the vault,” says NPD analyst Matt Powell. And at least one former skeptic has come around to the idea. “I thought there was no way 14- to 24-year-olds would relate to me, so I thought it was a bad strategy,” Smith says. “I’ve been proven wrong. Big time.”


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.businessoffashion.com

FRANKFURT, Germany — Adidas AG is racing ahead in the US with sales growth that’s outstripping arch rival Nike Inc. as its namesake brand and Reebok capitalise on the trend for retro and “athleisure” fashions that are worn off the sporting grounds. North America was the German company’s strongest-performing region in the first quarter, with a sales increase of 31 percent at constant currencies, followed by greater China at 30 percent, the company said Thursday. Nike’s North America revenue grew 3 percent in the three months through Feb. 28, showing that Adidas is gaining market share. Chief executive officer Kasper Rorsted has been doubling down on surging sales of casual sneaker lines like the Superstar, originally made popular in the 1980s by rappers Run DMC, to transform Adidas into a fast-fashion business as he seeks to catch up on Nike’s home turf. As of March, Adidas had a roughly 11 percent share of the US athletic footwear market, compared with about 55 percent for Nike, according to Deutsche Bank. “We need to be humble about where we are in the US,” Rorsted said on a call with reporters. “Our target is to build sustainable brand loyalty. We are coming from a very different basis than our larger competitor.” Adidas reported first-quarter profit that beat estimates, helped by a strong performance in the US, China and online. The shares rose as much as 3.7 percent in morning trading. Adidas raised its outlook four times last year, providing a springboard for Rorsted after he took the reins from longtime CEO Herbert Hainer in October. The company is betting big on a sportswear fashion trend that has also lifted smaller German sportswear brand Puma as consumers shift away from hard-core providers of athletic gear like Under Armour Inc. The company plans to invest more in the US and speed up its supply chain to sell more goods at full price. It’s targeting a quadrupling of online sales to €4 billion ($4.4 billion) by 2020 and wants to divest its golf hardware and the CCM hockey business as it focuses on its namesake label and the Reebok brand. Online sales advanced 53 percent in the quarter, Adidas said. Sales at Reebok grew 13 percent in the quarter, driven by strong double-digit sales increases in the “training” and “classics” categories. That was the strongest growth in “many years,” a spokeswoman said, though Rorsted cautioned that gains were unlikely to continue at that rate because the company pulled forward some product launches and opened a disproportionate number of new stores in China in the period. Adidas’s best-selling shoe in the US was the Superstar, which was third behind two Nike models in the period, according to market researcher NPD Group. Adidas’s strong performance in the US was not matched in Russia, where the sporting goods market shrank in the quarter as international sanctions and a lower oil price drove consumers to shop for cheaper clothes. The company has closed almost one in 10 of its Russian stores, Rorsted said. While that means Adidas will fall short of its forecast to increase sales in Russia by 10 percent this year, the change has no impact on the group’s overall targets, the executive said. Overall, earnings before interest and taxes rose 29 percent to 632 million euros, above the 592 million-euro average estimate of analysts compiled by Bloomberg. First-quarter sales rose 19 percent to 5.7 billion euros, beating the €5.4 billion average estimate. “Today’s earnings release confirms healthy and ongoing brand momentum at Adidas and improvements at Reebok, with growth rates ahead of peers,” RBS analyst Piral Dadhania said in a note, adding that the company’s “market share and margin opportunity in North America is structural and not cyclical.”


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

DETROIT--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Yesterday, the Detroit Medical Center (DMC) recognized the winners of its sixth annual Quality Education and Safe Systems Training (QuESST) Graduate Medical Education Research Day competition. This year's first place winners and their project titles were: Dr. Fazeena Shanaz, ”A quality improvement initiative to lower hba1c and to improve outcomes in patients with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus in the outpatient primary care clinic;”; Dr. Allie Dakroub, “Patient Centered Interdisciplinary Bed Rounding”; and Medical Student Mohamed Salar, “Analyzing Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infection in Robotic-assisted Arthroplasty Knee Surgeries: A Case-Control Study.” QuESST is a comprehensive program designed to increase the knowledge and application of patient safety best practices and quality improvement methods of DMC's Graduate Medical Education (GME) program participants. Each year, QuESST sponsors a conference highlighting more than 100 quality improvement projects produced by its participants. This year, 92 residents and fellows and 15 medical students from 42 programs at the DMC presented before Wayne State University School of Medicine and Michigan State College of Osteopathic Medicine faculty judges. "Our GME trainees’ persistence in asking the tough questions that will drive solutions for providing the safest and highest quality care for every patient who comes through our doors is what makes our annual QuESST program so successful," says Heidi Kromrei, PhD, assistant vice president of Academic Affairs at the DMC. The 2017 QuESST GME Resident Research Day showcased projects that recognized a variety of patient safety and quality improvement efforts conducted in clinical settings throughout the DMC over the past year. "Our QuESST participants have historically made significant contributions at the DMC," says Dr. Suzanne White, DMC CAO and CMO. "Their high impact work has translated to better care for patients, families and the community at large." During the half-day event, students discussed their projects with other students, residents, faculty and hospital administrators who, in turn, offered thoughtful feedback regarding opportunity for project expansion or enhancement. The QuESST program is designed to assist medical students and residents in further developing critical thinking and medical knowledge application while strengthening their leadership, communication and collaboration skills. The Detroit Medical Center operates eight hospitals and institutes, including Children’s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit Receiving Hospital, Harper University Hospital, Huron Valley-Sinai Hospital, Hutzel Women’s Hospital, Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan, Sinai-Grace Hospital, and DMC Heart Hospital. The Detroit Medical Center is a leading regional health care system with a mission of excellence in clinical care, research and medical education. The Detroit Medical Center is proud to be the Official Healthcare Services Provider of the Detroit Tigers, Detroit Red Wings and Detroit Pistons. For more information, visit www.dmc.org. "Like" us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/dmcheals, follow us on Twitter at @dmc_heals or check out our YouTube page at www.youtube.com/DetroitMedicalCenter.


Patent
DMC, Inc. | Date: 2015-03-11

A family of swaged connectors (10, 40, 50) has particular application for joining segments of copper cable (17) that make up a subterranean grounding grid in an electrical utility substation. The connectors have a body member (12, 42, 52) with at least one swage region (24, 44) having a trough (16) for receiving an electrical conductor (17). The swage region (24, 44) has an opening extending the length of the trough (16) to allow insertion, in a radial direction, of the electrical conductor (17) into the trough (16). An insert (14) is configured for mating engagement with the opening in the swage region (24, 44), such that, when the insert (14) is mated with the body member (12, 42, 52), an electrical conductor (17) disposed within the trough (16) is radially entrapped in the connector (10, 40, 50). The connector body (12, 42, 52) and insert (14) have a cylindrical outer surface in the swage region (24, 44) to facilitate swaging the connector to secure it to the electrical conductor. The connector may be configured as a lap splice, tee or elbow.


Patent
DMC, Inc. | Date: 2011-10-17

An improved connector for ACSR cable includes a connector core having an axial bore dimensioned to receive the steel core of the cable. A connector body has a substantially cylindrical outer surface and a substantially cylindrical cavity. A distal portion of the cavity having a first substantially cylindrical inner surface is dimensioned to receive the connector core. A second portion of the cavity proximally adjacent to the distal portion has a substantially cylindrical second inner surface dimensioned to receive the aluminum conductor strands of the cable. The connector body may be configured with one or more additional portions of the cavity having substantially cylindrical inner surfaces with progressively increasing diameters, the number of such portions depending on the size of the cable. The connector body is compressed with a swaging tool at several axially spaced-apart locations to grip the aluminum conductor strands and also to compress the connector core.


Patent
DMC, Inc. | Date: 2012-03-06

An improved cable connector includes a connector insert having an axial bore dimensioned to receive the core of a reinforced cable. A connector body has a substantially cylindrical outer surface and a substantially cylindrical cavity. A distal portion of the cavity is dimensioned to receive the connector insert. A second portion of the cavity proximally displaced from the distal portion is dimensioned to receive the conductor strands of the cable. The connector body may be configured with one or more additional portions of the cavity having progressively increasing diameters, the number of such portions depending on the size of the cable. Alternatively, the inner surface of the cavity may have a slight taper. Using a single die, the connector body is compressed with a swaging tool at several axially spaced-apart locations to grip the conductor strands and also to grip the connector insert.


Patent
DMC, Inc. | Date: 2013-09-10

A family of swaged connectors has particular application for joining segments of copper cable that make up a subterranean grounding grid in an electrical utility substation. The connectors have a body member with at least one swage region having a trough for receiving an electrical conductor. The swage region has an opening extending the length of the trough to allow insertion, in a radial direction, of the electrical conductor into the trough. An insert is configured for mating engagement with the opening in the swage region, such that, when the insert is mated with the body member, an electrical conductor disposed within the trough is radially entrapped in the connector. The connector body and insert have a cylindrical outer surface in the swage region to facilitate swaging the connector to secure it to the electrical conductor. The connector may be configured as a lap splice, tee or elbow.


Patent
DMC, Inc. | Date: 2013-02-20

An improved cable connector (20) includes a connector insert having an axial bore dimensioned to receive the core of a reinforced cable (10). A connector body (22) has a substantially cylindrical outer surface and a substantially cylindrical cavity. A distal portion of the cavity is dimensioned to receive the connector insert. A second portion of the cavity proximally displaced from the distal portion is dimensioned to receive the conductor strands of the cable. The connector body may be configured with one or more additional portions of the cavity having progressively increasing diameters, the number of such portions depending on the size of the cable. Alternatively, the inner surface of the cavity may have a slight taper. Using a single die, the connector body is compressed with a swaging tool at several axially spaced-apart locations to grip the conductor strands and also to grip the connector insert.


Patent
DMC, Inc. | Date: 2013-09-10

A repair sleeve has first and second end portions, each of which has a substantially cylindrical outer surface. The end portions are bored to receive a cable of a particular diameter. The inner surface of each end portion may be stepped or tapered. The center portion of the repair sleeve, between the two end portions, has an interior diameter substantially larger than the nominal diameter of the cable so that the repair sleeve can be use on a frayed cable or a cable with a failing splice. The repair sleeve is split longitudinally into two interlocking portions, which, when separated, allows the damaged cable or failing splice under repair to be inserted into a first one of the portions in a radial direction. The other portion is then inserted into the first portion and the repair sleeve is swaged onto the cable.


Patent
DMC, Inc. | Date: 2014-01-22

A swage tool includes a first die (26) coupled to a portion of a first die block (35) and a second die (26) coupled to a portion of a second die block (36). A cylinder (4) moves the second die toward the first die . The first die block (35) rotates about a longitudinal axis of the first die block (35).

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