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Demirbilek H.,Diyarbakir Children State Hospital | Nuri Ozbek M.,Diyarbakir Children State Hospital | Taner Baran R.,Diyarbakir Children State Hospital
JCRPE Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology | Year: 2013

Objective: Variability in the incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) related to geographical region, ethnic background, gender, and age indicates a need for further epidemiological studies. To date, there are no reported studies on the incidence of T1DM in the pediatric age group from the Southeastern region of Turkey. To define the incidence, demographic and clinical characteristics of T1DM in children 0-14 years of age in Diyarbakir, one of the largest cities in the Southeast region of Turkey. Methods: Hospital files of patients with the diagnosis of T1DM were reviewed. Data of all patients diagnosed between 1 June 2010 and 31 May 2011 were evaluated. Population data on the 0-14 age group were obtained from the Turkish Statistical Institute (TSI) reports. Results: From a total of 41 T1DM patients, 24 (58.5%) were female (male: 41.5%) with a male/female ratio of 1.4. The overall annual incidence of T1DM was 7.2/105, being 8.7/105 in females and 5.7/105 in males. The peak incidence was found to occur at age 5-9 years in the girls and 10-14 years in the boys. Mean age at diagnosis was 8.1±3.8 years. Rate of presentation with diabetic ketoacidosis was 65.9%. Patients applied most frequently in spring and winter months. Conclusions: In this first T1DM incidence study on the pediatric age group in Diyarbakir, Turkey, T1DM incidence was found to be similar to that in countries with low-middle incidence. ©Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology, Published by Galenos Publishing.


Raimondo A.,University of Oxford | Chakera A.J.,University of Exeter | Thomsen S.K.,University of Oxford | Colclough K.,Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation Trust | And 11 more authors.
Human molecular genetics | Year: 2014

Mutations in glucokinase (GCK) cause a spectrum of glycemic disorders. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations cause mild fasting hyperglycemia irrespective of mutation severity due to compensation from the unaffected allele. Conversely, homozygous loss-of-function mutations cause permanent neonatal diabetes requiring lifelong insulin treatment. This study aimed to determine the relationship between in vitro mutation severity and clinical phenotype in a large international case series of patients with homozygous GCK mutations. Clinical characteristics for 30 patients with diabetes due to homozygous GCK mutations (19 unique mutations, including 16 missense) were compiled and assigned a clinical severity grade (CSG) based on birth weight and age at diagnosis. The majority (28 of 30) of subjects were diagnosed before 9 months, with the remaining two at 9 and 15 years. These are the first two cases of a homozygous GCK mutation diagnosed outside infancy. Recombinant mutant GCK proteins were analyzed for kinetic and thermostability characteristics and assigned a relative activity index (RAI) or relative stability index (RSI) value. Six of 16 missense mutations exhibited severe kinetic defects (RAI ≤ 0.01). There was no correlation between CSG and RAI (r(2) = 0.05, P = 0.39), indicating that kinetics alone did not explain the phenotype. Eighty percent of the remaining mutations showed reduced thermostability, the exceptions being the two later-onset mutations which exhibited increased thermostability. Comparison of CSG with RSI detected a highly significant correlation (r(2) = 0.74, P = 0.002). We report the largest case series of homozygous GCK mutations to date and demonstrate that they can cause childhood-onset diabetes, with protein instability being the major determinant of mutation severity. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.


PubMed | Diyarbakir Children State Hospital, Queen Rania Al Abdullah Hospital for Children, Dr Sadi Konuk Education and Research Hospital, University of Exeter and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Human molecular genetics | Year: 2014

Mutations in glucokinase (GCK) cause a spectrum of glycemic disorders. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations cause mild fasting hyperglycemia irrespective of mutation severity due to compensation from the unaffected allele. Conversely, homozygous loss-of-function mutations cause permanent neonatal diabetes requiring lifelong insulin treatment. This study aimed to determine the relationship between in vitro mutation severity and clinical phenotype in a large international case series of patients with homozygous GCK mutations. Clinical characteristics for 30 patients with diabetes due to homozygous GCK mutations (19 unique mutations, including 16 missense) were compiled and assigned a clinical severity grade (CSG) based on birth weight and age at diagnosis. The majority (28 of 30) of subjects were diagnosed before 9 months, with the remaining two at 9 and 15 years. These are the first two cases of a homozygous GCK mutation diagnosed outside infancy. Recombinant mutant GCK proteins were analyzed for kinetic and thermostability characteristics and assigned a relative activity index (RAI) or relative stability index (RSI) value. Six of 16 missense mutations exhibited severe kinetic defects (RAI 0.01). There was no correlation between CSG and RAI (r(2) = 0.05, P = 0.39), indicating that kinetics alone did not explain the phenotype. Eighty percent of the remaining mutations showed reduced thermostability, the exceptions being the two later-onset mutations which exhibited increased thermostability. Comparison of CSG with RSI detected a highly significant correlation (r(2) = 0.74, P = 0.002). We report the largest case series of homozygous GCK mutations to date and demonstrate that they can cause childhood-onset diabetes, with protein instability being the major determinant of mutation severity.

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