Time filter

Source Type

Dos Santos L.D.,Claro | Santos K.S.,Discipline of Allergy and Immunology | Santos K.S.,Federal University of Rio de Janeiro | Pinto J.R.A.,Claro | And 11 more authors.
Journal of Proteome Research

The study reported here is a classical bottom-up proteomic approach where proteins from wasp venom were extracted and separated by 2-DE; the individual protein spots were proteolytically digested and subsequently identified by using tandem mass spectrometry and database query with the protein search engine MASCOT. Eighty-four venom proteins belonging to 12 different molecular functions were identified. These proteins were classified into three groups; the first is constituted of typical venom proteins: antigens-5, hyaluronidases, phospholipases, heat shock proteins, metalloproteinases, metalloproteinase- desintegrin like proteins, serine proteinases, proteinase inhibitors, vascular endothelial growth factor-related protein, arginine kinases, Sol i-II and -II like proteins, alpha-glucosidase, and superoxide dismutases. The second contained proteins structurally related to the muscles that involves the venom reservoir. The third group, associated with the housekeeping of cells from venom glands, was composed of enzymes, membrane proteins of different types, and transcriptional factors. The composition of P. paulista venom permits us to hypothesize about a general envenoming mechanism based on five actions: (i) diffusion of venom through the tissues and to the blood, (ii) tissue, (iii) hemolysis, (iv) inflammation, and (v) allergy-played by antigen-5, PLA1, hyaluronidase, HSP 60, HSP 90, and arginine kinases. © 2010 American Chemical Society. Source

Pinto J.R.A.D.S.,Sao Paulo State University | Pinto J.R.A.D.S.,Institute for Research in Immunology INCT iii | Santos L.D.D.,Sao Paulo State University | Santos L.D.D.,Institute for Research in Immunology INCT iii | And 6 more authors.
Protein and Peptide Letters

Polybia paulista wasp venom possesses three major allergens: phospholipase A1, hyaluronidase and antigen-5. To the best of our knowledge, no hyaluronidase from the venom of Neotropical social wasps was structurally characterized up to this moment, mainly due to its reduced amount in the venom of the tropical wasp species (about 0.5% of crude venom). Four different glycoproteic forms of this enzyme were detected in the venom of the wasp Polybia paulista. In the present investigation, an innovative experimental approach was developed combining 2-D SDS-PAGE with in-gel protein digestion by different proteolytic enzymes, followed by mass spectrometry analysis under collision-induced dissociation CID) conditions for the complete assignment of the protein sequencing. Thus, the most abundant form of this enzyme in P. paulista venom, the hyaluronidase-III, was sequenced, revealing that the first 47 amino acid residues from the N-terminal region, common to other Hymenoptera venom hyaluronidases, are missing. The molecular modeling revealed that hyaluronidase-III has a single polypeptide chain, folded into a tertiary structure, presenting a central (β/α)5 core with alternation of β-strands and α-helices; the tertiary structure stabilized by a single disulfide bridge between the residues Cys189 and Cys201. The structural pattern reported for P. paulista venom hyaluronidase-III is compatible with the classification of the enzyme as member of the family 56 of glycosidase hydrolases. Moreover, its structural characterization will encourage the use of this protein as a model for future development of component-resolved diagnosis'. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers. Source

Discover hidden collaborations