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Antunez K.,Institute Investigaciones Biologicas Clemente Estable | Anido M.,Institute Investigaciones Biologicas Clemente Estable | Branchiccela B.,Institute Investigaciones Biologicas Clemente Estable | Harriet J.,Direccion Of Laboratorios Veterinarios Miguel C Rubino | And 6 more authors.
Microbial Ecology | Year: 2015

Honeybees are susceptible to a wide range of pathogens, which have been related to the occurrence of colony loss episodes reported mainly in north hemisphere countries. Their ability to resist those infections is compromised if they are malnourished or exposed to pesticides. The aim of the present study was to carry out an epidemiological study in Uruguay, South America, in order to evaluate the dynamics and interaction of honeybee pathogens and evaluate their association with the presence of external stress factors such as restricted pollen diversity and presence of agrochemicals. We monitored 40 colonies in two apiaries over 24 months, regularly quantifying colony strength, parasite and pathogen status, and pollen diversity. Chlorinated pesticides, phosphorus, pyrethroid, fipronil, or sulfas were not found in stored pollen in any colony or season. Varroa destructor was widespread in March (end of summer–beginning of autumn), decreasing after acaricide treatments. Viruses ABPV, DWV, and SBV presented a similar trend, while IAPV and KBV were not detected. Nosema ceranae was detected along the year while Nosema apis was detected only in one sample. Fifteen percent of the colonies died, being associated to high V. destructor mite load in March and high N. ceranae spore loads in September. Although similar results have been reported in north hemisphere countries, this is the first study of these characteristics in Uruguay, highlighting the regional importance. On the other side, colonies with pollen of diverse botanical origins showed reduced viral infection levels, suggesting that an adequate nutrition is important for the development of healthy colonies. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Riet-Correa F.,Federal University of Campina Grande | Rivero R.,Direccion Of Laboratorios Veterinarios Miguel C Rubino | Odriozola E.,Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria | Adrien M.L.,University of the Republic of Uruguay | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation | Year: 2013

In the current study, mycotoxicoses of ruminants and horses are reviewed, with an emphasis on the occurrence of these diseases in South America. The main mycotoxicoses observed in grazing cattle include intoxications by indole-diterpenoid mycotoxins (Paspalum spp. contaminated by Claviceps paspali, Lolium perenne infected by Neotyphodium lolii, Cynodon dactylon infected by Claviceps cynodontis, and Poa huecu), gangrenous ergotism and dysthermic syndrome (hyperthermia) caused by Festuca arundinacea (syn. Festuca elatior) infected by Neotyphodium coenophialum (syn. Acremonium coenophialum), and photosensitization in pastures contaminated by toxigenic Pithomyces chartarum. Other mycotoxicoses in grazing cattle include slaframine toxicity in clover pastures infected by Rhizoctonia leguminicola and diplodiosis in cattle grazing in corn stubbles. The mycotoxicoses caused by contaminated concentrated food or byproducts in cattle include poisoning by toxins of Aspergillus clavatus, which contaminate barley or sugar beetroot by-products, gangrenous ergotism or dysthermic syndrome caused by wheat bran or wheat screenings contaminated with Claviceps purpurea, and acute respiratory distress caused by damaged sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas). The main mycotoxicosis of horses is leukoencephalomalacia caused by the fumonisins B1 and B2 produced by Fusarium spp. Poisoning by C. purpurea and F. elatior infected by N. coenophialum has also been reported as a cause of agalactia and neonatal mortality in mares. Slaframine toxicosis caused by the ingestion of alfalfa hay contaminated by R. leguminicola has also been reported in horses. © 2013 The Author(s).


Antunez K.,Institute Investigaciones Biologicas Clemente Estable | Anido M.,Institute Investigaciones Biologicas Clemente Estable | Branchiccela B.,Institute Investigaciones Biologicas Clemente Estable | Harriet J.,Direccion Of Laboratorios Veterinarios Miguel C Rubino | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Invertebrate Pathology | Year: 2012

Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American Foulbrood (AFB), a deleterious disease that affects honeybees. In Uruguay it was first reported in 1999. In 2001 the bacterium was spread all over the country, and its prevalence in honey was estimated in 51%. Two . P. larvae genotypes were found; ERIC I - BOX A, worldwide distributed and ERIC I - BOX C, exclusively detected in Argentina until then. In the present manuscript we analyzed the evolution of AFB outbreaks from 1999 to 2009, presented a new nation-wide survey carried out during 2011 when a prevalence of 2% was found and discuss national strategies for prevention of the disease. Since Uruguay is a small country where almost all beekeepers are registered, Uruguayan experience can be useful to be applied in other countries. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

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