Khetri, India
Khetri, India

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Srinivasan M.P.,University of Kentucky | Srinivasan M.P.,Keystone Foundation | Kalita R.,Dimoria College | Gurung I.K.,Dimoria College | And 2 more authors.
Acta Oecologica | Year: 2012

The spread of the exotic shrub Scotch broom in the montane grasslands of the Nilgiris is one of the major threats to biodiversity and ecosystem function there. It is likely that fire suppression over the past few decades is the proximate cause of expansion of broom populations. This study capitalizes on a wildfire event to examine fire effects on mature broom populations and soil seedbanks. Fire resulted in widespread death of mature broom stands but also stimulated broom soil seedbanks. However, this initial difference in seedling densities in burned and unburned plots was lost over time due to continuous recruitment in unburned plots. In a seed addition experiment, plots which were clipped prior to the fire showed higher germination success, possibly because fire temperature was moderated by biomass removal. In another experiment, non-dormant broom seeds were added to burned plots, which then received clipping treatments; there were no differences in broom seedling survival in clipped vs. unclipped plots. Overall, these results suggest that prescribed burning might contribute to the control of Scotch broom invasion by helping eliminate mature stands without significantly increasing regeneration from seed. © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS.


Das P.K.,Gauhati University | Deka D.K.,Gauhati University | Bora M.,Dimoria College
International Journal of Applied Environmental Sciences | Year: 2013

identified as a large water storage beel. The beel once provided habitat for a large number of flora and fauna and received rain water from nearby hills and plains. Previously the beel accommodates huge water and could control flood of Guwahati area, but at present due to huge encroachment, dumping of solid wastes, the morphology of the beel has changed and reduces in size. The quality of the water of the beel has deteriorated gradually due to anthropogenic factors. To evaluate the nature of degradation and its effect, a systematic study has been a carried out from different locations of the water and the different physicochemical parameters have been determined. Huge population explosion, rapid urbanization, unauthorized occupation of the beel areas, lack of social awareness for environmental protection and sort of proper planning, the area of wetland is gradually decreasing and has changed the ecosystem of the beel. Moreover, some remedial measures have been suggested to protect the beel for future generations. © Research India Publications.


Bharali J.,Dimoria College | Baruah B.K.,Cotton College | Sarma H.P.,Gauhati University
Pollution Research | Year: 2010

The present communication deals with the primary productivity of four wetlands namely, Sohola, Kawoimari, Borbeel and Jamuguri of Kaziranga National park, Assam. The study revealed higher rate of gross primary productivity and net primary productivity during winter season followed by post monsoon and pre monsoon season. The productivity values suggested that the wetlands are at properly functional state having adequate trophic status at the producer level and can support appropriate consumer population. Copyright © EM International.


Bharali J.,Dimoria College | Baruah B.K.,Cotton College | Sarma H.P.,Gauhati University
Pollution Research | Year: 2010

This paper deals with the macrozoobenthic population of four wetlands namely, Sohola, Kawoimari, Borbeel and Jamuguri of Kaziranga National Park, Assam. The study was carried out for two years covering pre-monsoon, post-monsoon and winter seasons and revealed the presence of gastropod in the range of 20-67 No./m2, oligochaeta 35-78 No./m2, hirudinea 4-16 No./m2, dipterans 50-115 No./m2 and bivalve 10-40 No./m2 in the wetlands during different seasons of the study period. Copyright © EM International.


Bharali J.,Dimoria College | Baruah B.K.,Cotton College | Sarma H.P.,Gauhati University
Pollution Research | Year: 2010

The present paper deals with the phyto and zooplankton population in four perennial wetlands namely, Sohola, Borbeel, Kawoimari and Jamuguri of Kaziranga National Park, Assam. Two consecutive years of seasonal study revealed total four (4) taxa of phytoplankton representing thirty five (35) genera and ten (10) taxa of zooplankton representing forty nine (49) genera in the wetlands. Copyright © EM International.

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