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Troy, MI, United States

Jasurda D.,Dimensional Control Systems , Inc.
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2015

The aerospace industry is continually becoming more competitive. With an aircraft's large number of components, and the large supplier base used to fabricate these components, it can be a daunting task to manage the quality status of all parts in an accurate, timely and actionable manner. This paper focuses on a proof of concept for an aircraft fuselage assembly to monitor the process capability of machined parts at an aircraft original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and their supply chain. Through the use of standardized measurement plans and statistical analysis of the measured output, the paper will illustrate how stakeholders can understand the process performance details at a workcell level, as well as overall line and plant performance in real time. This ideal process begins in the product engineering phase using simulation to analyze the tolerance specifications and assembly process strategy, with one of the outputs being a production measurement plan. This establishes clear guidelines for consistency in the inspection process. The measured data generated during the inspections is aggregated, analyzed and reported as a process capability index. This index is monitored in real time to track quality status across the organization. Issues are identified, reported and resolved using root cause drill downs to find the source within seconds or minutes of the measurements being made. By showing production variation based on data, aircraft manufacturers are creating actionable reporting and quality tracking for process capability at their production sites, on a continuous and nearly instantaneous basis. Copyright © 2015 SAE International. Source


Jasurda D.,Dimensional Control Systems , Inc.
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2012

Quality itself is no longer a differentiator among aerospace manufacturers. High quality is expected and achievable. With enough time and money, any manufacturer can turn around a high-quality product. Around the globe, the focus of manufacturing quality is shifting to a discussion about the cost of quality and how to manage it. The question being asked by manufacturers is no longer how to achieve quality, but how to achieve it within cost and time constraints. The aerospace manufacturer that can achieve quality with the least expense, while producing products the fastest, is the one that will win in today's tough, global market. This paper will describe the "closed-loop" approach to dimensional engineering, utilizing virtual simulations and tolerance analyses, and how such an approach can link cost factors with tolerance adjustments so that users have the data they need to make the most strategic business decisions regarding the balance between quality and cost. With such an approach, users are able to determine how to precisely meet their quality requirements by identifying and focusing on the key points affecting quality while avoiding unnecessarily tight tolerances that can prevent them from achieving cost and time goals. Copyright © 2012 SAE International. Source


Jasurda D.,Dimensional Control Systems , Inc.
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2015

The effects of thermal expansion and gravity on assembly processes in automotive manufacturing can and often do cause unexpected variation. Not only do these effects cause assembly issues, they can also create non-conformance and warranty problems later in the product lifecycle. Using 3D CAD models, advances in simulation allow engineers to design out these influences through a combination of tooling, process and tolerance changes to reduce costs. This whitepaper examines the process of simulating the effect of both thermal expansion and gravity on automotive structures. Using real life examples, a number of solutions were determined and tested in a simulated environment to reduce product variation and account for unavoidable environmental variation. © 2015 SAE International. Source


Jasurda D.,Dimensional Control Systems , Inc.
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2012

Users of a well-thought-out dimensional engineering (DE) process and the latest simulation-based tolerance analysis tools can greatly reduce the need for physical prototypes through virtual analysis. This presentation will highlight how tolerance analysis tools used as part of a DE process enable users to complete the development and launch of new and enhanced products in far less time than the competition. Don Jasurda, an experienced industry speaker, will describe how simulation-based tools used in a "closed-loop" DE process enable users to identify potential engineering issues in the virtual world instead of using physical prototypes. He will highlight real-life case study examples where automotive OEMs and suppliers have been able to use such tools to: Quickly predict and respond to the affects of variation and its impact on product quality.Identify and fix engineering problems in the earliest phases of product development when the costs of changes are low, minimizing engineering and tooling changes needed later in the program stages when the financial impact is dramatically higher.Address the three key "fit, finish and function" questions that drive the perceived quality of their products:Do things fit together as intended?Does the product look like it supposed to look?Does the product function as intended?Link cost factors with tolerance adjustments, enabling users to determine the optimal trade-offs between cost and quality, precisely meeting their quality requirements while avoiding unnecessarily tight tolerances that can prevent them from meeting their cost goals. Those companies that make the best use of the DE process and tolerance analysis tools are able to completely understand dimensional fit characteristics and quality status before commencing the build process. This has resulted in shorter launch cycles, improved process capabilities, reduced scrap and less production downtime. Copyright © 2012 SAE International. Source


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.99K | Year: 2001

The objective of this study has been to demonstrate that the Dimensional Management System (DMS) can be successfully used within the shipbuilding industry. The purpose of dimensional management is to improve quality and reduce rework and the overall costof ship production. By using computer simulation, the time required to generate and interpret geometric dimensioning and tolerancing scheme will be greatly reduced; the design intent of tolerance controls will be clearly communicated to the Design /Quality / Engineering / Fabrication groups resulting in greatly reduced rework and improved quality and production efficiency.The present capabilities of DCS's dimensional simulation tools are completely applicable and operational within the shipbuilding domain. These tools were used to model and analyze the assembly of a ship's double bottom blocks, and to model weld shrinkageand distortion, the principal sources of dimensional variation in shipbuilding. The potential applicability of DCS dimensional variation modeling, simulation, and analysis processes and tools is already very high within the shipbuilding industry. However,during Phase II the improvement of dimensional variation modeling capabilities associated with weld shrinkage and distortion modeling, the refinement of dimensional management processes to suit the industry, and the involvement of U.S. shipyards in thedevelopment and evaluation of these processes and tools, will greatly improve the potential applicability of dimensional management practices within the shipbuilding industry.

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