Digital Pathways

United Kingdom

Digital Pathways

United Kingdom
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

News Article | July 18, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

"Digital Pathways' expertise in ensuring businesses have the correct data security infrastructure in place is a perfect match for PKWARE's encryption and persistent data-protection solutions," said Miller Newton, CEO of PKWARE. "We are thrilled to be able to work together to provide stronger data security offerings for customers to protect their sensitive information, intellectual property, reputation and brand." Under the agreement, Digital Pathways will be authorised to sell the Smartcrypt product suite. PKWARE will leverage Digital Pathways professional services for assessments, design, configuration and implementation. The partnership will benefit customers across the financial, manufacturing, healthcare and central and local government sectors in need of a defense-in-depth data protection strategy to ensure sensitive data is fully protected against both insider and external threats. "We are pleased to be partnering with PKWARE," said Colin Tankard, Managing Director, Digital Pathways. "Their global business data protection products, such as secure mail, file and cloud encryption, will broaden Digital Pathways' ability to truly protect our clients' data wherever it resides and enable us to integrate with other solutions that may already be in place." Digital Pathways, based in Harlow, Essex, is a key addition to PKWARE's growing roster of Channel Partners. For three decades, PKWARE has provided encryption and compression software to more than 30,000 enterprise customers, including 200 government entities. Inventor of the .ZIP file format, PKWARE's smart encryption security solutions armor the data itself and eliminate vulnerabilities wherever data is used, shared, and stored. Digital Pathways has been in the data security market for over 20 years and has a range of solutions to meet today's complex requirements for compliance and data privacy both in the public and private sectors. These include fully managed data security systems for organisations that do not have the in-house expertise or the budget to acquire best of breed solutions.


Tankard C.,Digital Pathways
Network Security | Year: 2017

Big data refers to huge data sets that have come about through the phenomenal growth being seen in the volume of information collected, produced, analysed, shared and stored by organisations. By analysing big data sets, valuable insights can be gained into how patterns of data are associated to enable better-informed decision-making, which can aid in competitiveness and drive innovation. According to Gartner, 48% of organisations had invested in big data capabilities in 2016. Big data programmes benefit organisations in many ways, driving competitiveness and innovation. But they can also increase security risks owing to the vast amount of sensitive information they hold. Big data sets harness information from multiple sources such as databases, data warehouses, log and event files, security controls such as intrusion prevention systems and usergenerated data from sources such as emails and social media posts. So data security is a must for any organisation, and encryption needs to be a key part of that, says Colin Tankard of Digital Pathways. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd


Tankard C.,Digital Pathways
Network Security | Year: 2011

The UK Government has recently estimated that cybercrime costs the country some £27bn per year and, according to some estimates, the global cost is $1 trillion every year. This crime wave has been greatly facilitated by the rise of electronic communications, primarily those making use of the Internet. The purpose of electronic communications is to make it more efficient and easier to communicate - but they are also relatively easy to attack or intercept. No-one is immune - such attacks are aimed at individuals, small firms, multinationals and governments. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Tankard C.,Digital Pathways
Network Security | Year: 2015

Buildings today often incorporate the use of a building automation system, which provides automated centralised control of systems such as heating, ventilation, air conditioning and lighting. Buildings that employ such systems are often referred to as smart buildings. According to AutomatedBuildings, a smart building is defined as one that incorporates "the use of networked technology, embedded within architecture to monitor and control elements of the architecture for exchange of information between users, systems and buildings."1 So-called smart buildings make use of networked technology to connect a broad range of systems to central management consoles for more efficient operation. This use of networked technology has advantages for security as well, enabling feeds from security controls to be fed into the central management system so that anomalies in traffic flows can be seen and remedial action taken in an efficient, automated manner, as Colin Tankard of Digital Pathways explains. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Tankard C.,Digital Pathways
Network Security | Year: 2015

Data is the lifeblood of any organisation and has enormous value. Such data includes intellectual property and trade secrets, financial and customer records, and information related to employees. Much of that data is sensitive, and it is also of enormous value to those who would like to steal it for financial gain or commercial advantage. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Tankard C.,Digital Pathways
Network Security | Year: 2012

Managed security services hold a lot of promise and are suited for use by small and medium-size organisations, as well as their larger counterparts. Such services allow organisations to improve their overall security posture and meet governance and compliance objectives. Managed encryption services are a good example of how managed security services are able to provide organisations with significant benefits by taking away many of the pain points and by being cost-effective and easy to deploy, as Colin Tankard of DigitalPathways explains. The market for managed security services is showing strong levels of growth. According to a report issued by Infonetics Research in 2012, the worldwide market for managed security services was worth $11.7bn in 2011 and will grow to $18bn in 2016.1 Among the reasons for the growth are the increased importance of network security and risk management owing to the growing volume and sophistication of network security incidents. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Tankard C.,Digital Pathways
Network Security | Year: 2016

The long-awaited General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) of the EU was provisionally agreed in December 2015.1 The final details are still being ironed out, but publication of the final version of the regulation is expected around July 2016.2 There will then be a two-year waiting period until every organisation that does business in, or with, the EU must comply with the regulation. Since it is a regulation, not a directive, compliance is mandatory, without the need for each member state to ratify it into its own legislation. The GDPR expands the scope of data protection so that it applies to anyone or any organisation that collects and processes information related to EU citizens, no matter where they are based or where the data is stored. Colin Tankard of Digital Pathways examines what effect the new regulation is likely to have on organisations. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd


Tankard C.,Digital Pathways
Computer Fraud and Security | Year: 2015

The Internet of Things (IoT) was first envisaged in the last century, but interest has picked up in the past 15 years or so. It is a vision whereby potentially billions of 'things' - such as smart devices and sensors - are interconnected using machine-to-machine technology enabled by Internet or other IP-based connectivity. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Tankard C.,Digital Pathways
Network Security | Year: 2012

With regard to security, and especially to privacy, a one-size-fits-all approach is generally not appropriate for organisations operating in multiple jurisdictions. Employee monitoring is a prime example of how cultural expectations and local laws require careful consideration. Colin Tankard of Digital Pathways explains that firms wanting to use employee-monitoring schemes - which may include monitoring of emails, web and network use - need to tread very carefully. Differences in cultural attitudes play a large part in society. What is considered to be acceptable in one country can be highly offensive in another. Cultural differences can be a minefield for conducting business internationally, from how and when to shake hands to negotiating deals. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Tankard C.,Digital Pathways
Network Security | Year: 2012

Active Directory (AD) is a directory service that automates network management of user data, security and distributed resources. It is a core component of Microsoft's Windows server infrastructure and has been designed to provide a secure environment for managing users, services and resources. Its main purpose is to provide centralised authentication and authorisation for services such as email, collaboration tools, databases, applications and file shares across Windows domains. As such, it is considered to be a mission-critical part of the network infrastructure and is crucial for the internal security of the network through its ability to mitigate internal threats. But it's not the easiest system to use, which can undermine its security benefits. Active Directory is a core component of the network infrastructure of many organisational networks and is crucial for the internal security of the network by mitigating internal threats. However, managing it is often a complex, time-consuming task. Configuration errors can lead to serious security vulnerabilities. Organisations should look for addon tools that automate many of the processes involved and that ease many of the management pains and complexity. These will streamline many processes, and ensure changes do not impact the overall security posture of the organisation, explains Colin Tankard of Digital Pathways. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

Loading Digital Pathways collaborators
Loading Digital Pathways collaborators