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Tankard C.,Digital Pathways
Network Security | Year: 2011

The UK Government has recently estimated that cybercrime costs the country some £27bn per year and, according to some estimates, the global cost is $1 trillion every year. This crime wave has been greatly facilitated by the rise of electronic communications, primarily those making use of the Internet. The purpose of electronic communications is to make it more efficient and easier to communicate - but they are also relatively easy to attack or intercept. No-one is immune - such attacks are aimed at individuals, small firms, multinationals and governments. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Tankard C.,Digital Pathways
Computer Fraud and Security | Year: 2015

The Internet of Things (IoT) was first envisaged in the last century, but interest has picked up in the past 15 years or so. It is a vision whereby potentially billions of 'things' - such as smart devices and sensors - are interconnected using machine-to-machine technology enabled by Internet or other IP-based connectivity. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Tankard C.,Digital Pathways
Network Security | Year: 2015

Buildings today often incorporate the use of a building automation system, which provides automated centralised control of systems such as heating, ventilation, air conditioning and lighting. Buildings that employ such systems are often referred to as smart buildings. According to AutomatedBuildings, a smart building is defined as one that incorporates "the use of networked technology, embedded within architecture to monitor and control elements of the architecture for exchange of information between users, systems and buildings."1 So-called smart buildings make use of networked technology to connect a broad range of systems to central management consoles for more efficient operation. This use of networked technology has advantages for security as well, enabling feeds from security controls to be fed into the central management system so that anomalies in traffic flows can be seen and remedial action taken in an efficient, automated manner, as Colin Tankard of Digital Pathways explains. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Tankard C.,Digital Pathways
Network Security | Year: 2012

Managed security services hold a lot of promise and are suited for use by small and medium-size organisations, as well as their larger counterparts. Such services allow organisations to improve their overall security posture and meet governance and compliance objectives. Managed encryption services are a good example of how managed security services are able to provide organisations with significant benefits by taking away many of the pain points and by being cost-effective and easy to deploy, as Colin Tankard of DigitalPathways explains. The market for managed security services is showing strong levels of growth. According to a report issued by Infonetics Research in 2012, the worldwide market for managed security services was worth $11.7bn in 2011 and will grow to $18bn in 2016.1 Among the reasons for the growth are the increased importance of network security and risk management owing to the growing volume and sophistication of network security incidents. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Tankard C.,Digital Pathways
Network Security | Year: 2015

Data is the lifeblood of any organisation and has enormous value. Such data includes intellectual property and trade secrets, financial and customer records, and information related to employees. Much of that data is sensitive, and it is also of enormous value to those who would like to steal it for financial gain or commercial advantage. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source

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