Cooper Digestive Health Institute

Mount Laurel, NJ, United States

Cooper Digestive Health Institute

Mount Laurel, NJ, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Wang Y.R.,University of Pennsylvania | Wang Y.R.,Cooper Digestive Health Institute | Loftus Jr. E.V.,Mayo Medical School
Digestion | Year: 2013

Background: The magnitude of racial/ethnic and regional differences in the prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the United States remains largely unknown. Aims: To estimate differences in the prevalence of IBD by race/ethnicity and region. Methods: The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationally representative survey of US households and medical conditions, was used. A multivariate logistic model was used in statistical analysis. Results: Among 202,468 individuals surveyed during 1996-2007, 316 were diagnosed with IBD (26 Blacks, 21 Hispanics, and 5 Asians). The prevalence of IBD was higher in Whites [Crohn's disease: 154; ulcerative colitis (UC): 89] than Blacks (Crohn's disease: 68; UC: 25), Hispanics (Crohn's disease: 15; UC: 35), and Asians (Crohn's: 45; UC: 40) (all p < 0.05, except for UC in Asians). The differences in Crohn's disease between Whites and minorities and the difference in UC between Whites and Blacks remained significant in multivariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, there was no regional difference in the prevalence of Crohn's disease, but the prevalence of UC was higher in the Northeast than the South (p < 0.05). Conclusions: There were significant racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence of IBD in the USA. The underlying etiology of these differences warrants additional research. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.


Wang Y.R.,Rowan University | Wang Y.R.,Cooper Digestive Health Institute | Loftus E.V.,Mayo Medical School
Digestion | Year: 2014

Background: Patients with longstanding inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) involving large intestine proximal to rectum are considered to be at increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). One prior study showed low utilization of surveillance colonoscopy in patients with ≥8 years of ulcerative colitis (UC) in the USA. Aims: To study use of surveillance colonoscopy among Medicare beneficiaries with IBD in the 2-year period prior to CRC diagnosis. Data and Methods: Our study sample included Medicare beneficiaries in the SEER-Medicare-linked database who were diagnosed with CRC during 2001-2005 and had ≥3 physician visits with ICD-9 diagnosis code for IBD prior to CRC diagnosis. Medicare beneficiaries aged >85 years without Part B coverage or enrolled in HMOs were excluded. Colonoscopy performed within 6-30 months prior to CRC diagnosis was defined as surveillance colonoscopy. The χ2 test and multivariate logistic regression were used in statistical analysis. Results: Of 241 Medicare beneficiaries with IBD and diagnosed with CRC, 92 (38%) patients underwent ≥1 surveillance colonoscopy in the 2 years prior to cancer diagnosis. The use of surveillance colonoscopy was similar between Crohn's disease (28/86, 33%) and UC (64/155, 41%). In multivariate logistic regression, older age (odds ratio (OR) 0.97, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.94-0.99) was negative associated with surveillance colonoscopy use and personal history of colon polyp (OR 2.73, 95% CI 1.09-6.87) was positively associated with surveillance colonoscopy use. Conclusions: Use of surveillance colonoscopy was low among Medicare beneficiaries with IBD in the 2 years prior to CRC diagnosis. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.


Wang Y.R.,Cooper Digestive Health Institute | Wang Y.R.,University of Pennsylvania | Loftus Jr. E.V.,Mayo Medical School
Mayo Clinic Proceedings | Year: 2013

Objective: To determine whether the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) decreases after colonoscopy compared with sigmoidoscopy or no lower endoscopy. Patients and Methods: Patients 67 to 80 years old in the 5%random Medicare sample of the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results and Medicareelinked database were grouped into those who underwent colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2002, and those who did not undergo lower endoscopy. We excluded patients with inflammatory bowel disease, history of colon polyps, or family history of CRC. All patients were followed up until the diagnosis of CRC or carcinoma in situ, death, or December 31, 2005. The risk of CRC after colonoscopy was compared with the risk after sigmoidoscopy or no lower endoscopy. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used in statistical analysis. Results: In the colonoscopy group (n=12,266), 58 CRCs (0.5%) were diagnosed during follow-up compared with 66 CRCs (1.0%) in the sigmoidoscopy group (n=6402) and 634 (1.5%) in the control group (n=41,410) (all P<.001). In the sigmoidoscopy group, 771 patients (12.0%) underwent colonoscopy within the next 12 months. In multivariate Cox regressions, colonoscopy was associated with a decreased risk of distal CRC (hazard ratio [HR], 0.266; 95%CI, 0.161-0.437) and proximal CRC (HR, 0.451; 95%CI, 0.305-0.666); sigmoidoscopy was associated with a decreased risk of distal CRC (HR, 0.409; 95%CI, 0.207-0.809) but not proximal CRC. Conclusion: Among older patients, the risk of distal CRC decreased after both colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy; the risk of proximal CRC decreased after colonoscopy but not sigmoidoscopy. © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research.


Wang Y.R.,University of Pennsylvania | Wang Y.R.,Cooper Digestive Health Institute
American Journal of Gastroenterology | Year: 2013

OBJECTIVES:Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Previous studies on early/missed CRCs after colonoscopy excluded IBD patients. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of early/missed CRCs after colonoscopy among IBD and non-IBD patients, and identify factors associated with early/missed CRCs.METHODS:All patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results Medicare-linked database who were 67 years or older at colonoscopy during 1998-2005 and those who were subsequently diagnosed with CRC within 36 months were identified. CRCs diagnosed within 6 months of colonoscopy were categorized as detected CRCs; CRCs diagnosed 6-36 months after colonoscopy were categorized as early/missed CRCs. The rate of early/missed CRCs was calculated as number of early/missed CRCs divided by number of detected and early/missed CRCs. The χ 2 test and multivariate logistic regression were used in statistical analysis.RESULTS:Of 55,008 CRC patients (304 Crohn's disease; 544 ulcerative colitis (UC)), the rate of early/missed CRCs was 5.8% for non-IBD patients, 15.1% for Crohn's, and 15.8% for UC (P<0.001). Compared with older non-IBD patients, early/missed CRCs among older IBD patients were less likely right-sided (both P<0.05). In multivariate logistic regression, the risk of early/missed CRCs was three times as high for IBD patients (Crohn's odds ratio (OR), 3.07; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.23-4.21; UC OR, 3.05; 95% CI, 2.44-3.81). Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of this finding.CONCLUSIONS:Older IBD patients had a higher rate of early/missed CRCs after colonoscopy. Our finding supports intensive surveillance colonoscopy for older IBD patients as recommended by guidelines.


Wang Y.R.,Mayo Medical School | Wang Y.R.,University of Pennsylvania | Wang Y.R.,Cooper Digestive Health Institute | Cangemi J.R.,Mayo Medical School | And 2 more authors.
Mayo Clinic Proceedings | Year: 2013

Objectives: To compare the proportion of interval left-sided colorectal cancers (CRCs) after flexible sigmoidoscopy vs colonoscopy in older patients and to identify factors associated with interval CRC. Patients and Methods: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End ResultseMedicareelinked database, we studied patients 67 years or older with left-sided CRC who had at least one lower endoscopy performed within the previous 36 months between July 1, 2001, and December 31, 2005. The CRCs diagnosed within 6 months of lower endoscopy were defined as detected CRCs; CRCs diagnosed 6 to 36 months after lower endoscopy were defined as interval CRCs. The proportion of interval CRCs was calculated as number of interval CRCs divided by number of detected and interval CRCs. The χ2 test and a multivariate logistic regression model were used in the statistical analysis. Results: Of 15,484 older patients with left-sided CRC, the proportion of interval CRCs after flexible sigmoidoscopy was 8.8%compared with 2.5%after colonoscopy (P<.001). This difference was similar across left colon locations and largest in the descending colon (17.1%vs 3.5%; P<.001). In multivariate logistic regression, the odds of interval CRC after flexible sigmoidoscopy was 3 times as high as that after colonoscopy (odds ratio, 3.52; 95%CI, 2.66-4.65). Conclusion: In older patients with left-sided CRC, the odds of interval CRC after flexible sigmoidoscopy was 3 times as high as that after colonoscopy. Whether this finding reflects differences in bowel preparation quality, sedation use, or depth of insertion warrants future research. © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research.


PubMed | Cooper Digestive Health Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Mayo Clinic proceedings | Year: 2013

To determine whether the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) decreases after colonoscopy compared with sigmoidoscopy or no lower endoscopy.Patients 67 to 80 years old in the 5% random Medicare sample of the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results and Medicare-linked database were grouped into those who underwent colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2002, and those who did not undergo lower endoscopy. We excluded patients with inflammatory bowel disease, history of colon polyps, or family history of CRC. All patients were followed up until the diagnosis of CRC or carcinoma in situ, death, or December 31, 2005. The risk of CRC after colonoscopy was compared with the risk after sigmoidoscopy or no lower endoscopy. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used in statistical analysis.In the colonoscopy group (n=12,266), 58 CRCs (0.5%) were diagnosed during follow-up compared with 66 CRCs (1.0%) in the sigmoidoscopy group (n=6402) and 634 (1.5%) in the control group (n=41,410) (all P<.001). In the sigmoidoscopy group, 771 patients (12.0%) underwent colonoscopy within the next 12 months. In multivariate Cox regressions, colonoscopy was associated with a decreased risk of distal CRC (hazard ratio [HR], 0.266; 95% CI, 0.161-0.437) and proximal CRC (HR, 0.451; 95% CI, 0.305-0.666); sigmoidoscopy was associated with a decreased risk of distal CRC (HR, 0.409; 95% CI, 0.207-0.809) but not proximal CRC.Among older patients, the risk of distal CRC decreased after both colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy; the risk of proximal CRC decreased after colonoscopy but not sigmoidoscopy.

Loading Cooper Digestive Health Institute collaborators
Loading Cooper Digestive Health Institute collaborators