Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Unit

Ancona, Italy

Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Unit

Ancona, Italy
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Olivieri F.,Marche Polytechnic University | Ricci S.,Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Unit | Procopio A.D.,Marche Polytechnic University | Antonicelli R.,Cardiology Unit
Biomarkers | Year: 2013

Biomarkers play a critical role in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), especially in patients with atypical clinical and/or electrocardiographic presentation or co-morbidities, like the elderly. High-sensitivity assays based on specific biomarkers (e.g. cardiac troponins) enabling earlier AMI diagnosis have recently become available in clinical practice. Although no single biomarker of myocardial necrosis is ever likely to afford AMI diagnosis, a combination including different biomarkers for necrosis and ischemia, like new circulating molecules (microRNAs), could enhance diagnostic specificity. We review the recent literature on conventional and novel AMI biomarkers, with special emphasis on circulating microRNAs. © 2013 Informa UK Ltd.


Di Marco F.,Respiratory Unit | Di Marco F.,University of Milan | Terraneo S.,Respiratory Unit | Terraneo S.,University of Milan | And 18 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2016

The advent of pharmacological therapies for lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) has made early diagnosis important in women with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), although the lifelong cumulative radiation exposure caused by chest computer tomography (CT) should not be underestimated. We retrospectively investigated, in a cohort of TSC outpatients of San Paolo Hospital (Milan, Italy) 1) the role of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) for LAM diagnosis, 2) the association between LAM and other features of TSC (e.g. demography, extrapulmonary manifestations, genetic mutations, etc.), and 3) the characteristics of patients with multifocal micronodular pneumocyte hyperplasia (MMPH). Eighty-six women underwent chest CT scan; pulmonary involvement was found in 66 patients (77%; 49% LAM with or without MMPH, and 28% MMPH alone). LAM patients were older, with a higher rate of pneumothorax, presented more frequently with renal and hepatic angiomyolipomas, and tended to have a TSC2 mutation profile. PFTs, assessed in 64% of women unaffected by cognitive impairments, revealed a lower lung diffusion capacity in LAM patients. In multivariate analysis, age, but not PFTs, resulted independently associated with LAM diagnosis. Patients with MMPH alone did not show specific clinical, functional or genetic features. A mild respiratory impairment was most common in LAM-TSC patients: In conclusions, PFTs, even if indicated to assess impairment in lung function, are feasible in a limited number of patients, and are not significantly useful for LAM diagnosis in women with TSC. © 2016 Di Marco et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


PubMed | Cytogenetic and Molecular Pathology, Respiratory Unit, Disabled Advanced Medical Assistance Unit, Epilepsy Center and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2016

The advent of pharmacological therapies for lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) has made early diagnosis important in women with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), although the lifelong cumulative radiation exposure caused by chest computer tomography (CT) should not be underestimated. We retrospectively investigated, in a cohort of TSC outpatients of San Paolo Hospital (Milan, Italy) 1) the role of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) for LAM diagnosis, 2) the association between LAM and other features of TSC (e.g. demography, extrapulmonary manifestations, genetic mutations, etc.), and 3) the characteristics of patients with multifocal micronodular pneumocyte hyperplasia (MMPH). Eighty-six women underwent chest CT scan; pulmonary involvement was found in 66 patients (77%; 49% LAM with or without MMPH, and 28% MMPH alone). LAM patients were older, with a higher rate of pneumothorax, presented more frequently with renal and hepatic angiomyolipomas, and tended to have a TSC2 mutation profile. PFTs, assessed in 64% of women unaffected by cognitive impairments, revealed a lower lung diffusion capacity in LAM patients. In multivariate analysis, age, but not PFTs, resulted independently associated with LAM diagnosis. Patients with MMPH alone did not show specific clinical, functional or genetic features. A mild respiratory impairment was most common in LAM-TSC patients: In conclusions, PFTs, even if indicated to assess impairment in lung function, are feasible in a limited number of patients, and are not significantly useful for LAM diagnosis in women with TSC.


Leporini C.,University of Catanzaro | Ammendola M.,University of Catanzaro | Marech I.,Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Unit | Sammarco G.,University of Catanzaro | And 6 more authors.
World Journal of Gastroenterology | Year: 2015

Bone metastases from gastric cancer (GC) are considered a relatively uncommon finding; however, they are related to poorer prognosis. Both primary GC and its metastatic progression rely on angiogenesis. Several lines of evidence from GC patients strongly support the involvement of mast cells (MCs) positive to tryptase (MCPT) in primary gastric tumor angiogenesis. Recently, we analyzed infiltrating MCs and neovascularization in bone tissue metastases from primary GC patients, and observed a significant correlation between infiltrating MCPT and angiogenesis. Such a finding suggested the involvement of peritumoral MCPT by infiltrating surrounding tumor cells, and in bone metastasis angiogenesis from primary GC. Thus, an MCPT-stimulated angiogenic process could support the development of metastases in bone tissue. From this perspective, we aim to review the hypothetical involvement of tumorinfiltrating, peritumoral MCPT in angiogenesis-mediated GC cell growth in the bone microenvironment and in tumor-induced osteoclastic bone resorption. We also focus on the potential use of MCPT targeting agents, such as MCs tryptase inhibitors (gabexate mesylate, nafamostat mesylate) or c-KitR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (imatinib, masitinib), as possible new anti-angiogenic and anti-resorptive strategies for the treatment of GC patients affected by bone metastases. © 2015 Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved.


Tresoldi S.,Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Unit | Munari A.,University of Milan | Di Leo G.,Radiology Unit | Pompili G.,Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Unit | And 9 more authors.
Radiology | Year: 2015

Purpose: To estimate the association between myocardial fatty foci (MFF) on chest computed tomographic (CT) images and type of gene mutation or multiorgan involvement in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Materials and Methods: This retrospective case-control study was approved by the ethics committee, which waived the need for patient consent. Forty-eight patients with definite TSC (41 women; mean age, 35 years ± 11 [standard deviation]) and 96 age-and sex-matched patients without TSC who had undergone chest CT were evaluated. Two blinded readers independently scored MFF as low-attenuation areas within the myocardium. Patient history, gene mutation, and multiorgan involvement were obtained from clinical records. Cohen k, Mann-Whitney U, χ2 or Fisher exact, Kruskal-Wallis, and Spearman statistics were calculated. Results: One or more MFF was detected in 50% (24 of 48) of patients with TSC; however, no MFF was detected in control patients (P <.001). MFFs were oval (62%, 15 of 24) or linear (38%, nine of 24) and involved the left ventricle in 13 patients and both ventricles in 24 patients (mostly the apical or midleft ventricle); median size was 127 mm2. After four patients with TSC and unknown mutational status (two with MFF) were excluded, MFF was detected in 53% (10 of 19) of patients with TSC1 mutation, 65% (11 of 17) of patients with TSC2 mutation, and 12% (one of eight) of patients with TSC but without an identified mutation (P =.044). MFF presence was associated with brain (P =.011) and multiorgan (P =.008) involvement. The number of MFF per patient correlated with the degree of multiorgan involvement (P =.014). With MFF considered predictive of TSC, 50% (24of 48) sensitivity, 100% (96 of 96) specificity, 100% (24 of 24) positive predictive value, and 80% (96 of 120) negative predictive value were obtained. Conclusion: MFF was highly specific for TSC. MFF presence was associated with TSC gene mutations and with brain or multiorgan involvement; their number per patient was correlated with the degree of multiorgan involvement. © 2015 RSNA.

Loading Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Unit collaborators
Loading Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Unit collaborators