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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.newscientist.com

No insulin injections, no avoiding sugar. A daily drug can reverse diabetes symptoms in mice, opening up the possibility of a much easier way for diabetics to keep their blood sugar level within safe limits. In 2016, the number of people living with diabetes in the UK surpassed 4 million – an increase of 65 per cent over the course of a decade. Some 3.5 million have been diagnosed, but 550,000 are thought to have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes, which is linked to being overweight, and can develop later in life. Many people develop type 2 diabetes as they age, as their body’s response to insulin –  a hormone that controls how much sugar circulates in our blood – gets weaker. Some people can manage their symptoms by sticking to a restrictive diet, or using drugs to remove sugar from their system, although many of these have side effects, such as weight gain or diarrhoea. These drugs can only help manage the disease – they cannot reverse it. “We don’t have anything that can overcome insulin resistance,” says Emily Burns of the charity Diabetes UK. As a result, many people end up having to inject insulin to make sure excess sugar is removed from their blood. Left untreated, type 2 diabetes can lead to heart and kidney disease, nerve damage, foot ulcers and vision problems. A daily pill that restores the body’s sensitivity to insulin may make it easier to control the diabetes boom in rich nations where obesity is on the rise. Stephanie Stanford of the University of California, San Diego, and her team have found that giving mice with diabetes a drug that affects insulin signalling restores their ability to control their blood sugar levels. The drug was given daily, by mouth, and did not seem to have any side effects in the mice. The animals had developed the condition after a high-fat diet had made them obese. “This could lead to a new therapeutic strategy for treating type 2 diabetes,” says Stanford, whose team believes that the drug could lead to fewer people with adult-onset diabetes becoming dependent on insulin injections. “If this new drug works as described, it could be used to reverse insulin resistance, but we need to know first if it does that safely in people,” says Burns. The drug works by inhibiting an enzyme called low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMPTP), which seems to contribute to cells losing their sensitivity to insulin. By hindering LMPTP, the drug reawakens insulin receptors on the surface of cells – especially in the liver – which normally absorb excess sugar from the blood when they detect insulin. The gene that makes LMPTP has previously been linked with diabetes-like problems in people, prompting the team to investigate further. When the group stopped the gene working in mice, the animals no longer developed diabetes if fed a high-fat diet. Just stopping this gene in the liver was enough to produce the same effect. “We found that LMPTP is a critical promoter of insulin resistance that develops during obesity,” says Stanford. So the team developed a drug to block the LMPTP enzyme’s actions in the liver. “Our inhibitor increased activation of the insulin receptor in the liver, and reversed diabetes without any apparent negative side effects,” says Stanford. “The elegant studies here provide proof of concept that targeting LMPTP in the liver improves glucose control and liver insulin signalling in animals,” says Daniel Drucker of the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute in Toronto, Canada, who says that targeting enzymes like LMPTP has long been a goal for researchers tackling diabetes. So far, most of these efforts have focused on another tyrosine phosphatase enzyme, but it has proven difficult to block this without also causing side effects, says Drucker. “Our compound is very specific for the target, and we do not see any side effects after treatment in mice for a month, but the next step is to rigorously establish if it’s safe for use in clinical trials,” says Stanford. “Finding a way to make cells respond to insulin again is an important and exciting strategy,” says Burns. “So far, the drug has only been tested in mice, and while some research in human genetics suggests this approach could work in people too, we need more research before we know how relevant this could be for people with type 2 diabetes.” Stanford’s team is now embarking on safety testing in animals. “The next step towards the clinic is to understand whether the treatment will be safe for people,” she says. Read more: Let’s take a knife to the world’s rising tide of type 2 diabetes


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Australian scientists have discovered the first evidence of genes that cause Macular Telangiectasia type 2 (MacTel), a degenerative eye disease which leads to blindness and is currently incurable and untreatable Australian scientists have discovered the first evidence of genes that cause Macular Telangiectasia type 2 (MacTel), a degenerative eye disease which leads to blindness and is currently incurable and untreatable. The team's findings established five key regions -- or loci -- in the genome most likely to influence a person's risk of developing MacTel. The finding will enable researchers to better understand the disease and look for ways to prevent or stop its progression. The study, published today in Nature Genetics, was an international collaboration led by bioinformaticians Professor Melanie Bahlo and Dr Thomas Scerri at Melbourne's Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research. MacTel is a rare and complex disease that mainly affects people from the age of 40 onwards. The disease causes abnormal growth of blood vessels in the macula -- located in the middle of the retina. Patients experience a loss of central vision crucial for tasks requiring focus, such as driving or reading, with no treatment available to stop progression of the disease. Professor Bahlo said the study involved detailed genetic analysis of MacTel patients from around the world, including Australia, using genome wide association studies (GWAS). "We analysed more than six million genetic markers and identified five regions, called loci, across the genome that had similar patterns in people with the disease, but not the healthy individuals," Professor Bahlo said. "These five genetic risk loci are our treasure map, telling us where to 'keep digging' in order to discover the specific genes implicated in MacTel," she said. Professor Bahlo said the team worked with collaborators in London and New York to analyse the genetic data from 476 people with MacTel and 1733 controls (people without the disease). "We were thrilled when our results were corroborated by two further independent validation studies," she said. The analysis also revealed that people with the MacTel genetic risk loci identified in the study had changes in their metabolism, specifically in their glycine and serine levels. Professor Bahlo said this meant there could be a significant relationship between the level of glycine and serine in the body, and onset of the disease. "Though the exact link between the disease and glycine and serine is yet to be confirmed, the connection is an exciting clue to help us further explore metabolic abnormalities in people with MacTel," Professor Bahlo said. Dr Scerri said the team's work highlighted crucial points of interest that, with further investigation, could help researchers find a way to prevent the progression of the disease. "We are continuing to explore the genetic data to try to identify the specific genes involved, and the precise genetic variations that are leading to the disease," Dr Scerri said. President of the Lowy Medical Research Institute that sponsored the research Professor Martin Friedlander said the work represented a significant advancement in efforts to understand the cause of MacTel. "We are working to develop treatments effective in preserving vision in patients with this disease," he said. The research was supported by the Lowy Medical Research Institute, The Genomics Core Facility at the University of Utah School of Medicine, participants of the MacTel Project, the National Eye Institute, the Wellcome Trust, the British Heart Foundation, Diabetes UK, the National Institute for Health Research, Moorfields Biomedical Research Centre, Victorian State Government Operational Infrastructure and Support Scheme, and the National Health and Medical Research Council.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A new study shows further evidence for the view that spending too much time sitting down is bad for our health and our waistline. Research led by Dr William Tigbe, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick found workers who have a desk-bound job have bigger waists and increased risk of heart disease. It supports advice to sit less and be more active; as much as seven hours a day on your feet, and walking seven miles, may be needed to avoid heart disease. Dr Tigbe kitted out 111 healthy Glaswegian postal workers with activity monitors for seven days; 55 were office workers and 56 delivered post for a living. The study revealed differences between the two groups. Those who had desk jobs had a bigger waist circumference -- 97 cm compared to 94 cm -- and approximately one BMI unit difference. They also had a higher risk of cardiovascular disease -- 2.2% compared to 1.6% over ten years. The new study suggests that waist circumference increases by two centimetres, and risk of cardiovascular diseases by 0.2%, for every additional hour of sitting on top of five hours. Furthermore, bad cholesterol (LDL) increases and good cholesterol (HDL) decreases with each additional hour of sitting from five hours a day. Dr Tigbe said: "Longer time spent in sedentary posture is significantly associated with larger waist circumference, higher triglycerides (fat in the blood) and lower HDL cholesterol, all adding up to worse risk of heart disease. The levels associated with zero risk factors were walking more than 15,000 steps per day, which is equivalent to walking seven to eight miles, or spending seven hours per day upright. "Our findings could be used as the basis of new public health targets for sitting, lying, standing and stepping to avoid metabolic risks. "However the levels suggested in our research would be very challenging to achieve unless incorporated into people's occupations." The study participants wore a tiny physical activity and position monitor called activPAL, invented by co-authors from Glasgow Caledonian University, strapped to their thigh for seven days, except during activities that risk it being in contact with water, e.g. bathing or swimming. They also had their weight, height and blood pressure measured, and provided blood samples. Cardiovascular risks were assessed using the PROCAM risk calculator which takes into account age, sex, family history, blood pressure and metabolic measures. The study took place between took place between September 2006 and September 2007 and volunteers were recruited from the Royal Mail in Glasgow. Only apparently healthy, non-smokers, with no personal history of myocardial infarction (heart attack), stroke, coronary heart disease, hypertension or diabetes were included. None of the participants was on any lipid, blood pressure or glucose lowering medication. Fellow researcher Professor Mike Lean of the University of Glasgow's School of Medicine said: "In this research we have learned important information, relevant to health in modern working lives, by studying the activity patterns of postal workers, one of the last physically active occupations left in UK." "Our evolution, to become the human species, did not equip us well to spending all day sitting down. We probably adapted to be healthiest spending seven to eight hours every day on our feet, as hunters or gatherers. " "Our new research supports that idea. The 'bottom' line is that if you want to be sure of having no risks of heart disease, you must keep off your bottom!" The researchers urge further study of this topic is conducted in order to inform health policy makers. Time spent in sedentary posture is associated with waist circumference and cardiovascular risk is recently been published in the International Journal of Obesity. The research was part of Dr Tigbe's PhD project. Time spent in sedentary posture is associated with waist circumference and cardiovascular risk has been published in the International Journal of Obesity This research was funded by Glasgow Caledonian University as part of Dr Tigbe's PhD project. Professor Malcolm Granat is a director of PAL Technologies Ltd, (this research is not intended to promote the activPAL monitor or the company). Professor Naveed Sattar?s research is supported by the British Heart Foundation and Diabetes UK. Professor Mike Lean?s research is supported by Diabetes UK and by Counterweight Ltd.


News Article | November 11, 2016
Site: www.medicalnewstoday.com

A molecule thought to play a key role in some inflammatory diseases can be switched off by two widely used medicines, new research has shown. Scientists at the Universities of Bradford and Glasgow have identified a new biochemical pathway that can be controlled using metformin - a medicine used by diabetics to control blood sugar levels - and salicylate - the main ingredient in aspirin. The researchers now hope to conduct further studies and eventually clinical trails with the drugs, which are already prescribed to millions of patients around the world, for a range of inflammatory disorders. Professor Tim Palmer, a pharmacologist at the University of Bradford who led the research, said: "While our studies are at a very early stage, we've identified a new biochemical process that suggests certain anti-diabetic drugs could potentially be repurposed to treat diseases caused by activated Janus kinase proteins." Janus kinase (JAK) proteins - named after the ancient Roman two-faced god - are involved in controlling inflammation in certain tissues. They act like gatekeepers at the surface of cells, reacting to signals released by the immune system and transmitting these messages inside the cell. These Janus kinase proteins, however, can also carry mutations that make them faulty so they are permanently turned on and become overactive. A fault like this in Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) has been found to occur in several diseases. Professor Palmer and his colleagues, however, have found another protein, known as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), is able to turn JAK1 off - even when it is faulty. According to their findings, published in the journal Science Signalling, it does this by chemically altering two key amino acids in the JAK1 protein in a process called phosphorylation. They also showed metformin and salicylate can activate AMPK so it turns off JAK1 in this way. Professor Palmer said: "We found this AMPK pathway is able to profoundly inhibit JAK signalling and it seems to work in a way that other drugs that target the JAK proteins do not." The researchers believe this approach could also be used to turn off other Janus kinase proteins, which are known to be overactive in other diseases. Co-author Dr Ian Salt, a senior lecturer at the Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences at the University of Glasgow, added: "Although it is still early in our work, our findings suggest we can design future therapies for those disorders that target this pathway. Indeed, as AMPK is known to be stimulated by a number of existing anti-diabetic drugs, these should be investigated as potential drugs to treat those disorders." Funding for the study was provided by the British Heart Foundation and Diabetes UK. Article: Phosphorylation of Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) links energy sensing to anti-inflammatory signaling, Claire Rutherford, Claire Speirs, Jamie J. L. Williams, Marie-Ann Ewart, Sarah J. Mancini, Simon A. Hawley, Christian Delles, Benoit Viollet, Ana P. Costa-Pereira, George S. Baillie, Ian P. Salt, and Timothy M. Palmer, Science Signalling, doi: 10.1126/scisignal.aaf8566, published 8 November 2016.


News Article | December 8, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

In 2014, around seven million women in the UK were classified as obese. By 2025, it is expected to affect 1 in 5 women in the world. Obesity is a major risk factor for gestational diabetes, increasing the likelihood of the disorder three - five fold. Women with the disorder require intensive antenatal care to control blood glucose and to identify other common complications, particularly fetal macrosomia - a newborn who's significantly larger than average. In practice today, all obese pregnant women are categorised as being of equally high risk of gestational diabetes, whereas in reality, only around 25% will develop the disorder. In the study, funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), the team looked at how to correctly identify obese women with heightened risk, early in pregnancy, and as a result, enable timely targeted intervention to those women most likely to benefit. From the many factors tested, those that predicted gestational diabetes included older age, disease in a previous pregnancy, higher blood pressure and anthropometric measures such as skin thicknesses, waist and mid-arm circumferences. A number of blood tests, such as Haemoglobin A1c also added strength to the predictive tool. Out of the 1303 women in the study, 337 were affected by gestational diabetes. Lead author, Dr Sara White from King's College London said: "There is currently no accepted strategy to identify obese women at high risk of gestational diabetes, early in pregnancy. Today, all those classified as obese are considered high risk. With escalating rates of obesity worldwide, a more accurate way of defining risk is necessary in this group. "In this, the largest and most comprehensive study to date, we have used an extensive range of different measures to develop prediction tools. One of our models focused on a few clinical factors and biomarkers already readily available in clinical practice and which incurred minimal cost. In addition, we have identified a model that does not require blood sampling, which could be developed for low and middle income countries where the prevalence of gestational diabetes and obesity is rapidly increasing. "Clinical use of these tests would enable prompt intervention and correctly target those at highest risk and therefore most likely to benefit." Dr White is continuing her research into gestational diabetes with the support of Diabetes UK. King's College London is one of the top 25 universities in the world (2016/17 QS World University Rankings) and among the oldest in England. King's has more than 27,600 students (of whom nearly 10,500 are graduate students) from some 150 countries worldwide, and some 6,800 staff. King's has an outstanding reputation for world-class teaching and cutting-edge research. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) King's was ranked 6th nationally in the 'power' ranking, which takes into account both the quality and quantity of research activity, and 7th for quality according to Times Higher Education rankings. Eighty-four per cent of research at King's was deemed 'world-leading' or 'internationally excellent' (3* and 4*). The university is in the top seven UK universities for research earnings and has an overall annual income of more than £684 million. For further information, please visit the website: http://www. 2. The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is funded by the Department of Health to improve the health and wealth of the nation through research. The NIHR is the research arm of the NHS. Since its establishment in April 2006, the NIHR has transformed research in the NHS. It has increased the volume of applied health research for the benefit of patients and the public, driven faster translation of basic science discoveries into tangible benefits for patients and the economy, and developed and supported the people who conduct and contribute to applied health research. The NIHR plays a key role in the Government's strategy for economic growth, attracting investment by the life-sciences industries through its world-class infrastructure for health research. Together, the NIHR people, programmes, centres of excellence and systems represent the most integrated health research system in the world. For further information, visit the NIHR website. 3. Dr White is continuing her research into gestational diabetes with the support of Diabetes UK.


News Article | December 16, 2016
Site: www.medicalnewstoday.com

Brain connections that play a key role in complex thinking skills show the poorest health with advancing age, new research suggests. Connections supporting functions such as movement and hearing are relatively well preserved in later life, the findings show. Scientists carrying out the most comprehensive study to date on ageing and the brain's connections charted subtle ways in which the brain's connections weaken with age. Knowing how and where connections between brain cells - so-called white matter - decline as we age is important in understanding why some people's brains and thinking skills age better than others. Worsening brain connections as we age contribute to a decline in thinking skills, such as reasoning, memory and speed of thinking. Researchers from the University of Edinburgh analysed brain scans from more than 3,500 people aged between 45 and 75 taking part in the UK Biobank study. Researchers say the data will provide more valuable insights into healthy brain and mental ageing, as well as making contributions to understanding a range of diseases and conditions. The study was published in Nature Communications journal. Dr Simon Cox, of the University of Edinburgh's Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology (CCACE), who led the study, said: "By precisely mapping which connections of the brain are most sensitive to age, and comparing different ways of measuring them, we hope to provide a reference point for future brain research in health and disease. "This is only one of the first of many exciting brain imaging results still to come from this important national health resource." Professor Ian Deary, Director of CCACE, said: "Until recently, studies of brain scans with this number of people were not possible. Day by day the UK Biobank sample grows, and this will make it possible to look carefully at the environmental and genetic factors that are associated with more or less healthy brains in older age." Professor Paul Matthews of Imperial College London, Chair of the UK Biobank Expert Working Group, who was not involved in the study, said: "This report provides an early example of the impact that early opening of the growing UK Biobank Imaging Enhancement database for access by researchers world-wide will have. "The large numbers of subjects in the database has enabled the group to rapidly characterise the ways in which the brain changes with age - and to do so with the confidence that large numbers of observations allow. "This study highlights the feasibility of defining what is typical, to inform the development of quantitative MRI measures for decision making in the clinic." The University of Edinburgh Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology receives funding from the Medical Research Council (MRC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). UK Biobank was established by the Wellcome Trust, MRC, Department of Health, Scottish Government and the Northwest Regional Development Agency. It has had funding from the Welsh Assembly Government, British Heart Foundation and Diabetes UK. UK Biobank is hosted by the University of Manchester and supported by the NHS. Article: Ageing and brain white matter structure in 3,513 UK Biobank participants, Simon R. Cox, Stuart J. Ritchie, Elliot M. Tucker-Drob, David C. Liewald, Saskia P. Hagenaars, Gail Davies, Joanna M. Wardlaw, Catharine R. Gale, Mark E. Bastin & Ian J. Deary, Nature Communications, doi:10.1038/ncomms13629, published online 15 December 2016.


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Brain connections that play a key role in complex thinking skills show the poorest health with advancing age, new research suggests Brain connections that play a key role in complex thinking skills show the poorest health with advancing age, new research suggests. Connections supporting functions such as movement and hearing are relatively well preserved in later life, the findings show. Scientists carrying out the most comprehensive study to date on ageing and the brain's connections charted subtle ways in which the brain's connections weaken with age. Knowing how and where connections between brain cells - so-called white matter - decline as we age is important in understanding why some people's brains and thinking skills age better than others. Worsening brain connections as we age contribute to a decline in thinking skills, such as reasoning, memory and speed of thinking. Researchers from the University of Edinburgh analysed brain scans from more than 3,500 people aged between 45 and 75 taking part in the UK Biobank study. Researchers say the data will provide more valuable insights into healthy brain and mental ageing, as well as making contributions to understanding a range of diseases and conditions. The study was published in Nature Communications journal. Dr Simon Cox, of the University of Edinburgh's Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology (CCACE), who led the study, said: "By precisely mapping which connections of the brain are most sensitive to age, and comparing different ways of measuring them, we hope to provide a reference point for future brain research in health and disease. "This is only one of the first of many exciting brain imaging results still to come from this important national health resource." Professor Ian Deary, Director of CCACE, said: "Until recently, studies of brain scans with this number of people were not possible. Day by day the UK Biobank sample grows, and this will make it possible to look carefully at the environmental and genetic factors that are associated with more or less healthy brains in older age." Professor Paul Matthews of Imperial College London, Chair of the UK Biobank Expert Working Group, who was not involved in the study, said: "This report provides an early example of the impact that early opening of the growing UK Biobank Imaging Enhancement database for access by researchers world-wide will have. "The large numbers of subjects in the database has enabled the group to rapidly characterise the ways in which the brain changes with age - and to do so with the confidence that large numbers of observations allow. "This study highlights the feasibility of defining what is typical, to inform the development of quantitative MRI measures for decision making in the clinic." The University of Edinburgh Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology receives funding from the Medical Research Council (MRC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). UK Biobank was established by the Wellcome Trust, MRC, Department of Health, Scottish Government and the Northwest Regional Development Agency. It has had funding from the Welsh Assembly Government, British Heart Foundation and Diabetes UK. UK Biobank is hosted by the University of Manchester and supported by the NHS. A video explanation of the research is available at: http://www. For further information, please contact: Joanne Morrison, Press and PR Office, tel +44 131 651 4266, email Joanne.Morrison@ed.ac.uk


News Article | December 28, 2016
Site: news.europawire.eu

PHE’s One You campaign is helping middle age people live more healthily by asking ‘How are you?’ and providing free support and tools. LONDON, 28-Dec-2016 — /EuropaWire/ — Eight out of 10 of the middle aged either weigh too much, drink too much or don’t exercise enough, as new analysis from Public Health England ( ) out today (28 December 2016) shows modern life taking its toll on health. ’s One You campaign is reaching out to the 83% of 40 to 60 year olds (87% of men and 79% of women) who are either overweight or obese, exceed the Chief Medical Officer’s (CMO) alcohol guidelines or are physically inactive, to provide free support and tools to help them live more healthily in 2017 and beyond. Modern life is harming the health of the nation: 77% of men and 63% of women in middle age are overweight or obese. Obesity in adults has shot up 16% in the last 20 years. Many also can’t identify what a ‘healthy’ body looks like, suggesting obesity has become the new normal. The diabetes rate among this age group also doubled in this period in England. Obese adults are more than 5 times more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than those who are a healthy weight (a body mass index between 18.5 and 25). Ninety per cent of adults with diabetes have Type 24. People are being urged to take a moment to consider their health and the simple steps they can take to improve it in the run up to the New Year, by taking the One You online quiz. People need to eat better, be more active, stop smoking and consider their drinking. The quiz, called ‘How Are You’, takes your lifestyle information, gives you a health score and then links to free localised, personalisable information, apps and tools. More than 1.1 million people have taken the quiz so far and where appropriate, been directed to download our apps like Couch to 5K, Alcohol Checker and Easy Meals. Nearly a quarter of a million people have subsequently downloaded Couch to 5K. These sit alongside ’s other online tools like the Heart Age tool which gives you your ‘heart age’ based on you age and lifestyle and we would also encourage people to take up their NHS Health Check invitation when they receive it. Professor Kevin Fenton, Director of Health and Wellbeing at , said: People are busy with work, with families, with the daily grind and sometimes their own health is the least of their priorities. The How Are You Quiz will help anyone who wants to take a few minutes to take stock and find out quickly where they can take a little action to make a big difference to their health. Professor Sir Muir Gray, Clinical Adviser for the One You campaign, said: Dan Howarth, Head of Care at Diabetes UK, said: We know that people often bury their heads in the sand when it comes to their general health but the consequences of doing nothing can be catastrophic. There are an estimated 11.9 million people at increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes in the UK because of their lifestyle and more than one million who already have the condition but have not yet been diagnosed. Type 2 diabetes can lead to serious complications such as amputation, blindness, heart attack, stroke and kidney disease. We know how hard it is to change the habits of a lifetime but we want people to seek the help they need to lose weight, stop smoking and take more exercise. Lots of us spend our lives working very hard, not sleeping enough and not always having time to exercise, so it can be really difficult to prioritise our health. But it’s vital to find out how you really are, so that you can get the advice and support you need. It’s never too late to improve your health and making small changes now can have a huge impact on your health in the future: it can even help to reverse preventable diseases. With the new year just around the corner, there’s no better time to start living better and enjoy the health benefits that will bring.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.prlog.org

Tackling diabetes is vital to the future of the health service, Diabetes UK say. "Based on current population trends, by 2035 4.9 million people will have diabetes."


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prfire.com

05 May 2016 (Windsor, UK). Health advertising agency Langland has developed a new campaign for Diabetes UK featuring a 3 day pop-up store located just off Brick Lane in London’s East End. Amp Shoes was a shoe store with a shocking twist – each shoe represents one of the 135 feet or lower limbs amputated in England every week because of diabetes. Amp Shoes was designed to deliver a serious message about the consequences of diabetes through a surprising and memorable experience. The campaign was created by Langland in partnership with Diabetes UK, Awesome Films, and global fashion and design company Eley Kishimoto. Diabetes UK hopes to not only raise awareness of the condition, but drive people to get tested through the diabetes UK Risk score – either in-store or online at ampshoes.co.uk. “Health awareness messages are notoriously difficult to make stick. People are tired of being lectured and quick to switch off from traditional communication channels, which is why Langland created Amp Shoes, a shoe store that focuses attention on the rising number of diabetes-related amputations in a completely fresh and unexpected way. Using a multi-faceted communications strategy, with what appears to be a ‘real’ shoe store at its centre, Amp Shoes creates the opportunity for people to consider their health, and leads them to take advantage of a free diabetes health assessment to understand personal levels of risk.” Andrew Spurgeon, Executive Creative Director, Langland. “More than 4 million people in the UK currently live with diabetes and this figure continues to escalate. The need to raise awareness about this condition and how best to prevent diabetes complications, such as amputation is vital if we are to stem the rise, particularly of Type 2 diabetes. Langland is proud to have conceived the idea of Amp Shoes, which is aligned to our purpose of creating ‘Ideas for a Healthier World’. We are also delighted that Diabetes UK is supporting the idea, giving it national visibility.” Philip Chin, Chief Executive, Langland. Amp Shoes, was located at 8 Dray Walk, London, E1 6QL, and ran from Friday 22nd through to Sunday 24th April. A live Periscope stream allowed visitors to witness reactions in real time from the online version of the store. The campaign was complemented by the social campaign #OneShoe selfie, which saw people all over the UK sharing a photo of themselves wearing just one shoe in support of those that only have one to wear. For more information about the campaign, visit ampshoes.co.uk. For more information about this press release, contact Campaign images and video available at https://www.dropbox.com/sh/irimy4gdqfoml1y/AACZwQxpNFY_TaSN39aG67kma?dl=0

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