Lipid & Diabetes Research Group

Christchurch, New Zealand

Lipid & Diabetes Research Group

Christchurch, New Zealand
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Pearson J.F.,University of Otago | Pullar J.M.,University of Otago | Wilson R.,University of Otago | Spittlehouse J.K.,University of Otago | And 5 more authors.
Nutrients | Year: 2017

A cohort of 50-year-olds from Canterbury, New Zealand (N = 404), representative of midlife adults, undertook comprehensive health and dietary assessments. Fasting plasma vitamin C concentrations (N = 369) and dietary vitamin C intake (N = 250) were determined. The mean plasma vitamin C concentration was 44.2 μmol/L (95% CI 42.4, 46.0); 62% of the cohort had inadequate plasma vitamin C concentrations (i.e.; <50 μmol/L), 13% of the cohort had hypovitaminosis C (i.e.; <23 μmol/L), and 2.4% had plasma vitamin C concentrations indicating deficiency (i.e.; <11 μmol/L). Men had a lower mean plasma vitamin C concentration than women, and a higher percentage of vitamin C inadequacy and deficiency. A higher prevalence of hypovitaminosis C and deficiency was observed in those of lower socio-economic status and in current smokers. Adults with higher vitamin C levels exhibited lower weight, BMI and waist circumference, and better measures of metabolic health, including HbA1c, insulin and triglycerides, all risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Lower levels of mild cognitive impairment were observed in those with the highest plasma vitamin C concentrations. Plasma vitamin C showed a stronger correlation with markers of metabolic health and cognitive impairment than dietary vitamin C. © 2017 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

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