Atlanta, GA, United States
Atlanta, GA, United States

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Hill K.,Harvard University | You D.,United Nations Childrens Fund | Inoue M.,World Health Organization | Oestergaard M.Z.,World Health Organization | And 7 more authors.
PLoS Medicine | Year: 2012

Monitoring development indicators has become a central interest of international agencies and countries for tracking progress towards the Millennium Development Goals. In this review, which also provides an introduction to a collection of articles, we describe the methodology used by the United Nations Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation to track country-specific changes in the key indicator for Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG 4), the decline of the under-five mortality rate (the probability of dying between birth and age five, also denoted in the literature as U5MR and 5q0). We review how relevant data from civil registration, sample registration, population censuses, and household surveys are compiled and assessed for United Nations member states, and how time series regression models are fitted to all points of acceptable quality to establish the trends in U5MR from which infant and neonatal mortality rates are generally derived. The application of this methodology indicates that, between 1990 and 2010, the global U5MR fell from 88 to 57 deaths per 1,000 live births, and the annual number of under-five deaths fell from 12.0 to 7.6 million. Although the annual rate of reduction in the U5MR accelerated from 1.9% for the period 1990-2000 to 2.5% for the period 2000-2010, it remains well below the 4.4% annual rate of reduction required to achieve the MDG 4 goal of a two-thirds reduction in U5MR from its 1990 value by 2015. Thus, despite progress in reducing child mortality worldwide, and an encouraging increase in the pace of decline over the last two decades, MDG 4 will not be met without greatly increasing efforts to reduce child deaths. © 2012 Hill et al.


Levenson J.S.,Lynn University | Prescott D.S.,Becket Family of Services | Jumper S.,DHS Inc
International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology | Year: 2014

The purpose of this study was to obtain feedback from civilly committed sex offenders (N = 113) about the components of treatment that they believed to be most important and helpful in preventing reoffense. Participants were also asked to rate their satisfaction with the treatment process and therapists. Victim empathy and accountability were rated as the most important elements of treatment, along with skills for preventing relapse and methods for controlling sexual arousal. There was a fairly robust correlation between client perceptions of importance and satisfaction on most treatment components. Some clients expressed concerns about respect, confidentiality, and judgmental attitudes of some therapists. Because civilly committed sex offenders are considered to be among the most likely to reoffend, strategies are discussed for engagement of this population in a meaningful process of change. © 2013 The Author(s).


Sambisa W.,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | Curtis S.,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | Mishra V.,DHS Inc
AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV | Year: 2010

Using the 2005-2006 Zimbabwe Demographic and Health Survey, we investigated the prevalence of HIV testing uptake within a sample of women (6839) and men (5315), and identified the independent effects of AIDS stigma on testing uptake, with particular emphasis on three pathways to testing: voluntary testing, testing when offered, and testing when required. The prevalence of self-reported HIV testing was higher among women (31%) than men (22%). For women, the main pathway to testing uptake was to accept testing when it is offered (46%), whereas for men it was voluntary testing (53%). In the logistic regression models, we found that social rejection stigma was inversely associated with uptake across all pathways of testing for women, but not men. As regards observed enacted stigma, respondents who both knew someone with HIV and had observed discrimination against someone with HIV were more likely to test for HIV through all pathways, while those who knew someone with HIV but had not observed stigma were more likely to test voluntarily. Individual characteristics important to the adoption of testing included high educational attainment, religion, exposure to mass media, and ever use of condoms; while being never married and self-perceived risk were barriers to testing. Programmatic strategies aimed at increasing HIV testing uptake should consider reducing stigma toward people living with HIV/AIDS and also addressing the role of agency and structure in individual's decision to be tested for HIV. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.


Fonash P.M.,DHS Inc
CrossTalk | Year: 2012

Strengthening the security and resilience of the cyber ecosystem requires reducing the number of vulnerabilities and the ability to automatically mitigate attack methodologies. This article draws from various research reports to categorize the underlying attack methodologies and summarizes current perspectives on the capabilities needed within the cyber ecosystem to strengthen its security and resilience, while protecting the privacy of the authorized users of the ecosystem.


Trademark
DHS Inc | Date: 2015-06-30

Vitamins; Dietary and nutritional supplements; Nutritional supplements in lotion form sold as a component of nutritional skin care products.


Trademark
DHS Inc | Date: 2014-10-03

Belts; Blouses; Coats; Dresses; Footwear; Hats; Jackets; Loungewear; Pants; Scarves; Shirts; Skirts; Sleepwear; Socks; Suits; Sweaters; T-shirts; Ties; Tops; Underwear; Uniforms.


Trademark
DHS Inc | Date: 2015-05-01

Wallets.


Trademark
DHS Inc | Date: 2015-05-01

All purpose sport bags; All-purpose athletic bags; All-purpose carrying bags; All-purpose carrying bags which feature a removable insert for holding a breast pump; All-purpose reusable carrying bags; Amenity bags sold empty; Animal carriers; Animal game bags; Athletic bags; Baby carrying bags; Backpacks, book bags, sports bags, bum bags, wallets and handbags; Bags of leather for packaging; Bags and holdalls for sports clothing; Bags for carrying babies accessories; Bags for climbers in the nature of all-purpose carrying bags; Bags for sports; Bags for umbrellas; Barrel bags; Beach bags; Belt bags; Belt bags and hip bags; Book bags; Boston bags; Bum bags; Business card holders in the nature of card cases; Cantle bags; Canvas shopping bags; Card wallets; Carry-all bags; Carry-on bags; Chain mesh purses; Chalk bags; Change purses; Charm bags (omamori-ire); Clutch bags; Clutch purses; Clutches; Coin holders in the nature of wallets; Coin purses; Coin purses not made of precious metal; Coin purses, not of precious metals; Cosmetic bags sold empty; Courier bags; Diaper bags; Dolly bags; Drawstring bags; Dry bags; Duffel bags; Duffel bags for travel; Duffle bags; Evening bags; Feed bags for animals; Flight bags; Garment bags for travel; Garment bags for travel made of leather; General purpose bags for carrying yoga equipment; General purpose bags for holding dance equipment; General purpose sport trolley bags; General use physician bags sold empty; Gladstone bags; Grip bags; Gym bags; Handbags, purses and wallets; Hard-sided and soft-sided carry-on bags and gym bags; Hiking bags; Hip bags; Hobo bags; Horse tail bags; Hunters game bags; Key bags; Key wallets; Kit bags; Knitted bags, not of precious metals; Leather and imitation leather bags; Leather and imitation leather sport bags and general purpose trolley bags; Leather bags and wallets; Leather bags for merchandise packaging; Leather bags, suitcases and wallets; Leather credit card wallets; Leather purses; Leather shopping bags; Make-up bags sold empty; Mens clutch bags; Mesh shopping bags; Messenger bags; Military duffle bags, garment bags for travel, tote bags, shoulder bags and backpacks; Minaudieres in the nature of small clutch purses; Multi-purpose purses; Multistranded, beaded clip that attaches to the outside of a womens purse as a decorative accessory; Overnight bags; Pet accessories, namely, canvas, vinyl and leather pouches for holding disposable bags to place pet waste in; Pet accessories, namely, specially designed canvas, vinyl or leather bags attached to animal leashes for holding small items such as keys, credit cards, money or disposable bags for disposing of pet waste; Pochettes; Pocket wallets; Pommel bags; Pouches and bags sold empty for attachment to backpacks; Purse frames; Purses; Purses; Purses and wallets; Purses and wallets of precious metal; Purses made of precious metal; Purses not made of precious metal; Purses of precious metal; Purses, not of precious metal; Reusable shopping bags; Reusable textile produce bags to carry produce from grocery stores and farmers markets; Roll bags; Sack packs, namely, drawstring bags used as backpacks; Saddle horn bags; Saddlery, namely, horn bags; School bags; School book bags; Shaving bags sold empty; Shoe bags for travel; Shopping bags made of skin; Shopping bags with wheels attached; Shoulder bags; Sling bags; Sling bags for carrying infants; Small bags for men; Small clutch purses; Small purses; Souvenir bags; Sport bags; Sports bags; Sportsmans hunting bags; String bags for shopping; Suit bags; Textile shopping bags; Toiletry bags sold empty; Tool bags sold empty; Tote bags; Travel bags; Traveling bags; Travelling bags; Waist bags; Wallet chains; Wallets; Wallets; Wallets and wallet inserts; Wallets including card holders; Wallets made of leather or other materials; Wallets with card compartments; Wallets, not of precious metal; Wash bags for carrying toiletries; Wheeled bags; Wheeled duffle bags; Wheeled messenger bags; Wheeled shopping bags; Wheeled tote bags; Wine bags with handles for carrying or holding wine; Wrist mounted carryall bags; Wrist mounted purses; Wrist or ankle mounted wallets; Wristlet bags.


Trademark
DHS Inc | Date: 2016-05-10

Computer software for records information management, records management, records retention and destruction management; Computer software for asset management; Computer software for warehouse and inventory management and data protection management; Computer software for digital imaging of records; Computer software for portable storage management and self storage management.


Trademark
DHS Inc | Date: 2014-10-03

Belts; Blouses; Coats; Dresses; Footwear; Hats; Jackets; Loungewear; Pants; Scarves; Shirts; Skirts; Sleepwear; Socks; Suits; Sweaters; T-shirts; Ties; Tops; Underwear; Uniforms.

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