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Dhaka, Bangladesh

Huq S.,ICDDR | Pietroni M.A.,Dhaka Hospital | Rahman H.,Laboratory science Division | Alam M.T.,Dhaka Hospital
Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition | Year: 2010

A 12-year old girl was brought to the Dhaka Hospital of ICDDR,B with diarrhoea. Incidentally, the parents provided a history of repeated episodes of pallor and jaundice since she was two and half years old. Three of her family members had similar problems. History, clinical examination, and laboratory findings of the girl and her family members suggested a case of hereditary spherocytosis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such a case in Bangladesh. © International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh. Source


Bibi S.,East West University of Bangladesh | Chisti M.J.,Dhaka Hospital | Chisti M.J.,Center for Nutrition and Food Security | Akram F.,East West University of Bangladesh | Pietroni M.A.C.,Dhaka Hospital
Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition | Year: 2012

The study evaluated the commonly-used drugs for the management of sepsis and their outcome among under-five children. We evaluated the hospital-records of all paediatric sepsis patients (n= 183) in the intensive care unit (ICU) and longer-stay unit (LSU) of the Dhaka Hospital of icddr,b. These records were collected from the hospital management system (SHEBA) during November 2009 to October 2010. A total of 183 under-five children with clinical sepsis were found during the study period, and 14 (8%) of them were neonates. One hundred and eighty-one patients had received a combination of injection ampicilin and injection gentamicin, and two patients had received the combination of injection ceftriaxone and injection gentamicin. Only 46 (25%) patients required a change of antibiotics to the combination of intravenous ceftriaxone plus gentamicin after non-response of injection ampicilin and injection gentamicin combination; 7/181 (4%) patients died who received injection ampicilin and injection gentamicin whereas none died among the other two patients who received injection ceftriaxone and injection gentamicin (p=1.00). The combination of injection ampicilin and injection gentamicin as the first-line antibiotics for the management of sepsis in children even beyond the neonatal age is very effective, resulting in lower mortality. Source

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