Development of Ginseng and Medical Plants Research Institute

Eumseong

Development of Ginseng and Medical Plants Research Institute

Eumseong
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Park H.K.,Kohwang Medical Research Institute | Kim S.K.,Kohwang Medical Research Institute | Lee S.W.,Development of Ginseng and Medical Plants Research Institute | Chung J.-H.,Kohwang Medical Research Institute | And 3 more authors.
Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences | Year: 2015

A recent study reported that Panax ginseng (P. ginseng) has a protective effect on the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). KH053 is used as a new herbal prescription consisting of P. ginseng and bee-pollen. The present study aimed to investigate whether the KH053 has inhibition effects on the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) using an animal model with testosterone induced BPH. The experiment was carried out in forty male Wistar 7. week old rats that were divided into four groups (control group, BPH group, positive group, and KH053 group). One group was used as the control and the three groups received subcutaneous injections of testosterone 20. mg/kg for 4. weeks to induce BPH. One of them received KH053 by oral gavage daily at doses of 200. mg/kg concurrently with the testosterone. The positive group received finasteride at a dose of 1. mg/kg with testosterone. After 4. weeks, all rats were sacrificed and analyzed for prostate weight, and growth factors. Results revealed that, compared to rats in the BPH group, KH053 showed that the prostate weight and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels in serum were significantly decreased and the decreases in hyperplasia in prostate were also observed. In addition, immunohistochemistry (IHC) also revealed that the protein expressions of growth factors [transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)] in prostate tissue were decreased in the KH053 group. In conclusion, these results suggest that KH053, comprising P. ginseng and bee-pollen, inhibits the development of BPH in Wistar rat model and might be used as functional food for BPH. © 2015 The Authors.


PubMed | Soonchunhyang University, Development of Ginseng and Medical Plants Research Institute, Chung - Ang University and Kyung Hee University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of molecular medicine | Year: 2016

Exposing a pregnant female to stress is a risk factor for the development of psychiatric disorders in the offspring. In the present study, we examined the effects of an extract of Valerianafauriei(VF) root (100mg/kg/day, administered on postnatal days35-56) on behavioral patterns as well as protein expression in the prefrontal cortex of the offspring of prenatally-stressed rats. Modified behavioral tests, including the forced swim test, the open field test, a social interaction test and the prepulse inhibition test were performed and many of the parameters were found to decrease in the offspring of the rats exposed to PNS compared with the offspring of the non-stressed rats. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses of the prefrontal cortex revealed that the downregulation of several neurodevelopmental proteins in the offspring of rats dams exposed to PNS was reversed after treatment with VF extract. These findings demonstrate that the downregulation of several proteins in the prefrontal cortex of the offspring of prenatallystressed rats may be associated with subsequent behavioral changes, and that these phenomena recovered following VF treatment. Our results suggest that VF decreases the incidence of prenatal stress related-psychiatric disorders, such as depression and schizophrenia.


PubMed | Soonchunhyang University and Development of Ginseng and Medical Plants Research Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of molecular medicine | Year: 2014

The exposure of pregnant females to stress during a critical period of fetal brain development is an environmental risk factor for the development of schizophrenia in adult offspring. Schizophrenia is a group of common mental disorders of unclear origin, affecting approximately 1% of the global population, showing a generally young age at onset. In the present study, a repeated variable stress paradigm was applied to pregnant rats during the final week of gestation. The effects of an extract of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (PG) on rats exposed to prenatal stress (PNS) were investigated in terms of behavioral activity and protein expression analyses. In the behavioral tests, grooming behavior in a social interaction test, line-crossing behavior in an open-field test and swimming activity in a forced-swim test were decreased in the rats exposed to PNS compared with the non-stressed offspring; the changes in behavioral activity were reversed upon oral treatment with PG (300 mg/kg). Subsequently, western blot analysis and immunohistochemical analyses of the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus revealed that the downregulation of several neurodevelopmental genes which occurred following exposure to PNS was reversed upon treatment with PG. The current findings demonstrate that the downregulation of several genes following exposure to PNS may affect subsequent behavioral changes, and that these phenomena are reversed following treatment with PG during pregnancy. Our results suggest that oral treatment with PG reduces the incidence of psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia.


PubMed | Soonchunhyang University, Development of Ginseng and Medical Plants Research Institute, Chung - Ang University and Kyung Hee University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Genetics and molecular research : GMR | Year: 2016

The transporter 1 ATP-binding cassette sub-family B (MDR/TAP) gene (TAP1) is located in the major histocompatibility complex class II region, and forms a heterodimer that plays a key role in endogenous antigen presentation pathways. Investigation of polymorphisms identified in these loci has revealed an association with several autoimmune disorders. Alopecia areata (AA) is a common autoimmune disease resulting from T cell-induced damage to hair follicles. The present study documents for the first time a comparison between the allelic and genotypic frequencies of TAP1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in patients with AA and those of a control group, using a direct sequencing method. Our results suggest an association between a promoter SNP (rs2071480) and susceptibility to this disease.


PubMed | Soonchunhyang University, Development of Ginseng and Medical Plants Research Institute and Kyung Hee University
Type: Clinical Trial | Journal: International journal of molecular medicine | Year: 2015

Exposure to stress during critical periods of fetal brain development is an environmental risk factor for the development of schizophrenia in adult offspring. In the present study, a repeated-variable stress paradigm was applied to pregnant rats during the last week of gestation, which is analogous to the second trimester of brain development in humans. Behavioral and proteomic analyses were conducted in prenatally-stressed (PNS) adult offspring and non-stressed (NS) adult controls. In the behavioral tests, grooming behavior in the social interaction test, line-crossing behavior in the open field test, and swimming behavior in the forced swimming test were decreased in the PNS group. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the expression of dihydropyrimidinase-like 2 (Dpysl2) or collapsin response mediator protein 2 (Crmp2) was downregulated in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of rats in the PNS group. Subsequently, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the human dihydropyrimidinase-like 2 (DPYSL2) gene were analyzed in a population. Two functional SNPs (rs9886448 in the promoter region and rs2289593 in the exon region) were associated with susceptibility to schizophrenia. The present findings demonstrated that the downregulation of genes such as Dpysl2 and Dypsl3 in a rat model of prenatal stress may affect subsequent behavioral changes and that polymorphisms of the DPYSL2 gene in humans may be associated with the development of schizophrenia. Taken together with previous studies investigating the association between the DPYSL2 gene and schizophrenia, the present findings may contribute additional evidence regarding developmental theories of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.


PubMed | National Institute of Animal Science, National Institute of Technology Tiruchirappalli, King Saud University, Tottori University and 4 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Molecules (Basel, Switzerland) | Year: 2016

The present study was designed to evaluate the antitumor effects of the synthetic Mannich base 1,3-bis-((3-hydroxynaphthalen-2-yl)phenylmethyl)urea (1,3-BPMU) against HEP-G2 hepatoma cells and diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced hepatocarcinoma (HCC) in albino rats. In vitro analysis results revealed that 1,3-BPMU showed significant cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition in HEP-G2 hepatoma cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, flow cytometry results indicated that 1,3-BPMU enhanced early and late apoptosis. The maximum apoptosis was exhibited at a concentration of 100 g/mL of 1,3-BPMU. In in vivo analysis, DEN treatment increased the content of nucleic acids, LPO and the activities of AST, ALT, ALP, LDH, GT and 5NT with decreased antioxidant activity as compared to control rats. However, 1,3-BPMU treatment to DEN-induced rats decreased the content of nucleic acids, LPO and the activities of AST, ALT, ALP, LDH, GT and 5NT and increased the activities of SOD, CAT, GPx, GST and GR (p < 0.05). Furthermore, 1,3-BPMU enhanced the apoptosis via upregulation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 and the downregulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL mRNA expression as compared to DEN-induced rats. Histological and ultrastructural investigation showed that 1,3-BPMU treatment renovated the internal architecture of the liver in DEN-induced rats. In this study, the molecular and pre-clinical results obtained by treatment of DEN-induced rats with 1,3-BPMU suggested that 1,3-BPMU might be considered as an antitumor compound in the future.

Loading Development of Ginseng and Medical Plants Research Institute collaborators
Loading Development of Ginseng and Medical Plants Research Institute collaborators