Deutsche Forschungsanstalt For Lebensmittelchemie Leibniz Institute Dfa

Freising, Germany

Deutsche Forschungsanstalt For Lebensmittelchemie Leibniz Institute Dfa

Freising, Germany
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Geithe C.,Deutsche Forschungsanstalt For Lebensmittelchemie Leibniz Institute Dfa | Protze J.,Leibniz Institute for Molecular Pharmacology | Kreuchwig F.,Leibniz Institute for Molecular Pharmacology | Krause G.,Leibniz Institute for Molecular Pharmacology | Krautwurst D.,Deutsche Forschungsanstalt For Lebensmittelchemie Leibniz Institute Dfa
Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences | Year: 2017

Chirality is a common phenomenon within odorants. Most pairs of enantiomers show only moderate differences in odor quality. One example for enantiomers that are easily discriminated by their odor quality is the carvones: humans significantly distinguish between the spearmint-like (R)-(−)-carvone and caraway-like (S)-(+)-carvone enantiomers. Moreover, for the (R)-(−)-carvone, an anosmia is observed in about 8% of the population, suggesting enantioselective odorant receptors (ORs). With only about 15% de-orphaned human ORs, the lack of OR crystal structures, and few comprehensive studies combining in silico and experimental approaches to elucidate structure–function relations of ORs, knowledge on cognate odorant/OR interactions is still sparse. An adjusted homology modeling approach considering OR-specific proline-caused conformations, odorant docking studies, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, and subsequent functional studies with recombinant ORs in a cell-based, real-time luminescence assay revealed 11 amino acid positions to constitute an enantioselective binding pocket necessary for a carvone function in human OR1A1 and murine Olfr43, respectively. Here, we identified enantioselective molecular determinants in both ORs that discriminate between minty and caraway odor. Comparison with orthologs from 36 mammalian species demonstrated a hominid-specific carvone binding pocket with about 100% conservation. Moreover, we identified loss-of-function SNPs associated with the carvone binding pocket of OR1A1. Given carvone enantiomer-specific receptor activation patterns including OR1A1, our data suggest OR1A1 as a candidate receptor for constituting a carvone enantioselective phenotype, which may help to explain mechanisms underlying a (R)-(−)-carvone-specific anosmia in humans. © 2017 Springer International Publishing AG

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