Design Institute

Zhangjiakou, China

Design Institute

Zhangjiakou, China
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TAIPEI, Taiwan, Dec. 22, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- The 2016 Taiwan International Student Design Competition (TISDC) was organized and promoted by the Ministry of Education's Youth Development Administration (YDA) and sponsored by the Sayling Wen Cultural & Educational Foundation and the iSee Taiwan Foundation. The four major categories in the 2016 competition attracted 14,864 entries from 69 countries and regions. The world-class panel of judges included 27 experts in design from 15 international organizations. Its scope of recruitment and evaluation criteria set the stage for the TISDC to become the top international design competition for students worldwide. In addition to the prizes for the entries in the four main categories, the Sayling Wen Cultural & Educational Foundation, with its vision of " Nurture a warmhearted society of humanist devotion and innovative thinking " and its groundings in Education, Innovation, and Caring, directly financed the 2016 YDA's International Design Organization Award, which expanded the number of awards in this category to 15, with a total prize outlay to NT$1.5 million. An official statement by the Sayling Wen Foundation expressed that the foundation hopes to encourage young designers by integrating their creativity with the multifaceted perspectives of international design organizations. For its part, the iSee Taiwan Foundation, in continuing to use culture, tourism and innovation to promote Taiwan's unique character and charms, again sponsored the TISDC Brand Specific Awards. A total of 621 entries were received from students in Taiwan, Mainland China, Singapore, India, Russia, Israel and elsewhere under this year's awards theme "The New Tableware Era - Taiwanese Cuisine & Cutlery Design". The award achieved its aim of helping students and the world experience the essence of Taiwanese culture. This year's TISDC brand-specific category prizes not only added a splash of excitement to the contest but also welcomed the world to partake in Taiwan's deep and vibrantly delicious food culture. The iSee Taiwan Foundation is committed to becoming an important window on Taiwan for the world. At this year's TISDC, the Foundation actively promoted Taiwanese food and culture through its sponsorship of the Brand Specific Category awards. The theme this year was "The New Tableware Era - Taiwanese Cuisine & Cutlery Design", with five 1st Prizes, five 2nd Prizes and eight 3rd Prizes. These five award winners used innovative and exquisitely executed designs in their tableware entries that highlighted Taiwan's food culture. All deeply impressed the judges and earned first prize recognitions. The entry "Hakka Pounded Tea" by students Ying-Chun Lin, Chiao-Chen Wang, Yu-Xuan Huang, and Yi-Chia Chen from Hsing Wu University of Science and Technology combines Hakka lei cha (hand-ground tea) and tableware design. The ingredients for the tea are poured into the container in an entertaining way before being ground into lei cha. The fun design helps capture and convey the beauty of Taiwan's Hakka culture to new generations. "Food-Time Travel" by students Wen-Cheng Tian, Yu-Wen Wang, Ying Cui, and Min Wei from Anyang Institute of Technology enhances the flavors of food over time by pairing 24 of Taiwan's best-known attractions with the traditional "24 seasonal segments" of Chinese tradition. "Rice Bowl of Mountain Scene" by students Po-Chun Chen, Yu-Fang Hung, and Po-Jui Wu uses Taiwan's world famous rice to depict Taiwan's Five Peaks in a sea of clouds. "Impression of Taiwan" by students Guang-HongYao, Bing-Cao Chao, and Meng-Juan Wang from Fuzhou University presents a set of utensils featuring Taiwan's scenery and cuisine for inspiration, reminding users of Taiwan's scenery while enjoying their meal. "Aromatic" by Ying-Chih Wang of Tatung University integrates images of Taiwan's Sun Moon Lake, Alishan's cloud sea, and Yangmingshan's flower season to accentuate the beauty of Taiwan's tourist attractions while users enjoy its exceptional cuisine. 2016 GTDF Strengthens Visitors' Impressions of Taiwan, Increases International Exchange, and Injects New Innovative Energy into Taiwan's Design Industry In order to fully promote the beauty of Taiwanese culture and to take advantage of having so many international designers in Taiwan, the iSee Taiwan Foundation held two tiers of events in conjunction with the 2016 Global Talent Design Festival(GTDF) in October and November. The culture & art heritage-focused International VIP Cultural Tour included visits to the Asia University Museum of Modern Art, Paper Dome, Chung Tai World Museum, and the National Taichung Theater in October and to the National Palace Museum, the Beitou Museum, and northern Taiwan hot springs in November.  The contemporary industrial design-focused Industrial Matching Tour included visits to the National Taiwan Craft Research and Development Institute and the Chungyo Department Store in October and to the Taiwan design centers of Franz and Pegatron in November. Don Chen, CEO of the iSee Taiwan Foundation, noted that his foundation is expanding the level of cultural exchange from tertiary institutions to design industries and is looking forward to injecting new innovative energy into Taiwan's design community through industry-cooperation/synergy-related events and activities. Taiwan International Masters of Design Series Expands Design Vision of Students and Enhances Integration across Disciplines The vision of the Sayling Wen Cultural & Educational Foundation is to "cultivate a humane, caring and innovative society" through the cultivation of exceptional talent and the encouragement of innovative thinking. Taking advantage of the presence of so many world-class jurors in Taiwan, the foundation invited all of TISDC's 11 international jurors to jointly host the Taiwan International Masters of Design Lecture Series on November 29th. The series included lectures by Good Design Australia CEO Brandon Gien (Designing a Better Future), International Poster Biennial (Mexico) founder Xavier Bermudez (Visual Design: A Tool for Social Issues), and INDEX: Design to Improve Life CEO for Communications Adam von Haffner (How to Enhance Your Life, Society and the World). Other lecturers in the series were presented by International Council of Design Vice President Antoine Abi Aad, Thailand Creative & Design Center Managing Director Apisit Laistrooglai, Design Business Chamber of Singapore Honorary Secretary Chee Su Eing, National Institute of Design Director Pradyumna Vyas, International Council of Design President Elect Zachary Haris Ong, and South African Bureau of the Standards Design Institute Senior Manager Polisa Magqibelo. German Design Council Vice Chairman Janine Wunde presented lectures at the lecture series' Tainan venue. The common objectives linking all of the lectures were to expand the design vision of students in Taiwan and to enhance cross-field integration through professional exchange. In addition to planning expert lectures, the Sayling Wen Cultural & Educational Foundation has spared no effort in promoting new services and personnel training. In 2011, the foundation launched World Innovative Service Enabler (WISE), which has facilitated broad-based cooperation with Taiwan's education system. WISE develops and oversees six-month study tours that are designed to create new service industry talent that will be able to transform and upgrade Taiwan's service sector. Board Member & Acting Chief Executive of the Sayling Wen Cultural & Educational Foundation Jeter Her stressed the importance of pre-career learning at the university level. Giving students opportunities to participate in professional training and enterprise implementation activities helps these students gain professional knowledge, which makes them more attractive to employers as proactive drivers of service-industry reform and innovation. Mr. Ted Wen, the incumbent Chairman of the foundation, has declared three core principles for the foundation: Education, Innovation, and Care. Pivoted around these core values is his vision to "Nurture a warmhearted society of humanist devotion and innovative thinking." Going forward, the four pillars of the foundation will be embedding the Chinese culture education in primary and secondary schools, enhancing career skills and teamwork mindset for vocational and college students, promoting lifelong learning in community and advocating service innovation to boost national competitiveness. While Taiwan is on its way toward a sophisticated "Service Economy", the foundation will also continue to devote every effort to promote the four pillars with the aim to breed new service talents, enhance Taiwan's national competitiveness, and play a key enabling role to Taiwan's transformation. The foundation was established by Sayling Wen in 2003. Ted Wen became the Chairman in 2008, and set the Foundation's vision as "becoming an essential portal for the world to see Taiwan" in the three core realms of culture, tourism, and innovation. The dual missions of iSee Taiwan Foundation are to successfully market Taiwan's unique character and heritage globally and to make the world as Taiwan's service market. The foundation focuses on exploring, integrating and promoting the culture and friendly nature of people and places throughout Taiwan, with the goal of creating more opportunities for Taiwan's service industry. The iSee Taiwan Foundation and the Sayling Wen Cultural & Educational Foundation continue to support the TISDC in cooperation with the Ministry of Education. This year, their support has expanded to include the 2016 Global Talent Design Festival (GTDF). The festival offers a new and stimulating array of design-related activities, including: 1) The International Masters Joint University Forum, which will invite representatives from major design organizations worldwide to engage Taiwanese design students and faculty in topical, interactive discussions that spotlight and promote Taiwan's service-oriented strengths; 2) The International VIP Cultural Tour program, which will take visiting design professionals who are in Taiwan for the TISDC on in-depth, topical tours of Taiwan society and culture; and 3) The Industry Joint Reception, which will highlight Taiwan's innate elegance and beauty, which are inexhaustible sources of inspiration for the domestic design industry and the bedrock of ongoing efforts to showcase and promote Taiwan's design strengths to a global audience.


News Article | April 14, 2016
Site: www.fastcompany.com

Fast Company editor Linda Tischler died Monday after a long illness. Linda started at Fast Company in 2000 and pioneered the magazine's design coverage at a time when few, if any, mainstream publications paid attention to design. Through her exuberant stories on everyone from architect Michael Graves to industrial designer Yves Béhar, she highlighted both the business of design and the importance of design in business. It is much to her credit that design has evolved into a core business practice, embraced by companies large and small. Here, we asked colleagues and friends to share memories of Linda.—Eds. Gadi Amit, founder, NewDealDesign I met Linda at a Fast Company event, when the economy was in a rut. At first, I was quite shy about approaching her, but we started chatting and when I suggested that we should pay more attention to design for the middle class—and less for the 1%—she lit up. With her warmth and intelligence, she said, "Okay, why don’t you do that? Write something!" The whole discourse around the democratization of design—Linda had a huge role in that. She always had a social conscience. Paola Antonelli, senior curator of architecture and design, Museum of Modern Art I have great memories of Linda in many different places—at MIT's Media Lab and at the Aspen Ideas festival, at MoMA at my marathon events and at evening panels with young designers. Everywhere, she was my kindred spirit, holding the design flag high with intelligence, open-mindedness, and generosity. Everywhere, her eyes pierced the air like curious, bemused laser beams, crowned by her bob that reminded me of my favorite Italian singer when I was a child. She was a force. She loved design and was able to explain it to all, very simply, honestly, and elegantly. I will personally miss her tremendously, and so will the design world. Rinat Aruh, cofounder, aruliden Linda taught me about what really mattered. Not just about design, but about friendships, business, and people. She always had to time to listen, looked out for me and gave the most appreciated feedback—straight to the point without any fluff! She was our biggest champion, constantly encouraging us to keep doing what we do while sharing her point of view with enthusiasm and humor! I will miss her dearly. Caroline Baumann, Director, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum LINDA=LIGHT. Linda Tischler spread light through her magnetic personality and that one-of-a-kind smile, and her unique embrace and celebration of design. She illuminated minds with the way she wrote and talked about design, and encouraged teens year after year to pursue careers in design at Cooper Hewitt’s Teen Design Fair. She was an irreplaceable model for them and for all of us—to share positivity, excitement and generosity. We miss you Linda. Yves Béhar, founder, fuseproject Through great times and tough ones Linda was a force with a smile. She was understanding and inquisitive, always curious about the world. I will never forget those qualities, and aspire to them. A couple of years ago, we spoke on stage at the Aspen Ideas Festival—it was fun and entertaining, it was just a solid human conversation about design and life. And this moment reminded me of how every conversation with Linda was always just that: a human story at the center of design. All of us designers are lucky she applied her talent and wit to design. I am lucky to have known her. It aches to say it: So long Linda. Dror Benshetrit, founder, Dror In 2002, I launched my design practice as a hopeful 25-year-old and shortly thereafter, met Linda. To this day, I count our meeting as one of my luckiest stars. Growing to become a supporter, mentor, and friend, she has been a pivotable force in my career, and I’m sure I’m not the only one for whom that holds true. In any instance, whether it be through her Fast Company articles, book with David Butler or speaking engagements, she radiated kindness, positivity, and love. Linda, I will miss you. Tim Brown, president and CEO, IDEO Linda was a great advocate for design thinking. My best memory of working with her was at the opening address of Bill Clinton’s Global Initiative conference. She was going through chemotherapy at the time, but you would never have known it. We were both sitting in the green room feeling very out of place alongside President Clinton, Queen Rania of Jordan and Jim Yong Kim, President of the World Bank. But once we got on stage we relaxed in each other's company and had an inspiring conversation about the role of design in social innovation. Her willingness to stand up for design in business and society, even when she was going through her own health challenges, was a great example for all of us. Design will miss her voice. Ken Carbone, founding partner, Carbone Smolan Agency Every designer owes Linda their deep gratitude. Linda was a courageous champion for all design disciplines and no one expressed the value of what we do better that her. Through her brilliance, curiosity and generous spirit, her influence on design and business was nothing short of singular. Beth Dickstein, founder, BDE If you're lucky, you get to work with good people. If your luckier, you get to make a great friend. I was luckier, as Linda and I were great friends. One I will miss tremendously. Her brilliance, humor, generosity and warmth were always there. When her illness was getting worse, I said, "I'll pray for you everyday." In her wonderful witty way she said, "Okay, better put it in overdrive, baby." I know the industry lost a dynamo, a straight shooter, a true journalist. Her family lost an irreplaceable force. I lost an amazing and caring friend. Tyler Gray, former editorial director, FastCompany.com I took over Linda's office at Fast Company when she stopped coming in. I remember finding the bottom drawer meticulously organized with clips and past issues of FC. I stacked them up and barely moved them because it felt like she was the steward of our archive. When people came in to ask about something we'd covered I half pretended it was me who kept that archive—not sure if anyone actually did other than her. The fib only stretched so far, though. She had dog-eared pages and Post-it notes on issues she clearly referred to often. Most people, including me, wouldn't have the patience today for that kind of thing these days without some sort of digital interface with search capabilities. Linda was a rare breed who could straddle the digital and analog worlds, with a mind that could slipstream through either. She commanded the respect of designers and architects and artists and brands—without ever seeming like she was relenting to anyone's will than he own. I've spent the evening reading through old emails we shared. I found this one, after she learned about her cancer, about the same time I learned about my mom's. "This stuff is scary as hell," she wrote, then referenced a Boston cancer institution. "When they handed me my little blue Dana-Farber card I thought, 'Shit! This is a club I never wanted to belong to!' but there you have it, and I guess you have to play the hand you're dealt. I'm going to give it my best shot." Walter Herbst, professor, Segal Design Institute, Northwestern University Like all who met her, it was an instant love affair. Linda visited our Management program in Product Design and Development at Northwestern University, some years back, which started it all. I invited Linda to speak at our annual design event, Design Chicago, which I knew came at the same time as the Milan Fair. She quickly shot back, that she had seen enough chairs in her life, and agreed to come. She captured the entire audience, which included our own design and development master’s students as well as our Kellogg MBA’s, our engineering students, as well as the president and the Deans of the university. Her influential talk may have led to what Northwestern University has now—"Design" as one of our pillars. We were always checking in, and she was always finding time to talk about our kids and of course design. I will miss her, as will everyone who knew her. David Kelley, founder, IDEO and Stanford d.school Most people know Linda for her hugely generous support of design. But what not everyone may know is how her work connected people. She was the first to break the story of my cancer publicly in a piece she wrote in 2009 about design thinking. For her to tell the story in such a caring, thoughtful, sensitive way helped me have the conversation with others. Her writing engendered so much empathy. People shared their stories with me, and I bonded with those who’d gone through it themselves. Knowing how difficult that experience was, I admired Linda’s strength in soldiering on and not making a big deal about her own illness. In the piece she wrote, she quoted me about the moment we started calling ourselves design thinkers: "I'm not a words person, but in my life, it's the most powerful moment that words or labeling ever made. Because then it all made sense." Linda was a words person, and what she wrote changed the world of design, and lives like mine, too. Judy Klavin, president, Kalvin Public Relations Nobody covered the intersection of design and business the way Linda did. We started working together in 2008 when I arranged meetings for her with my design firm clients. Before the meeting, we’d spend hours reviewing story ideas that we thought for sure she’d be interested in. Then she’d zero in on a completely different angle or something she saw on a designer’s desk that caught her eye. And, the story she’d develop and write was always smart and engaging. Shortly after, she was recruiting design leaders to be guest bloggers on the inaugural FastCoDesign site. She had a gift for encouraging the creative community to articulate their vision and bring it to life. I am so grateful for her friendship, honesty, insight and determination. Thank you, Linda, for uncovering so many stories that might never have been told. We all learned so much from you. Cliff Kuang, founding editor, Co.Design Linda was a giant. Our readers today often remark how Fast Company has brought design into the realm of business and innovation; Linda pioneered that ideal as an editor here in the early 2000s. Moreover, she kept with it. Through the relationships she cultivated in the profession, she helped make the very first iterations of FastCompany.com into a platform for designers to be heard. And it was because she believed in the power of design, and she believed in the optimism inherent in making the world a little bit better with the things you do every day. All of us at Fast Company, who've found our careers bringing design stories to the world, owe Linda a debt. Hopefully, we can repay it by continuing the work. Stuart Leslie, president, 4sight Inc. Conversations with Linda about design were always the highlight of my day and I looked forward to each one. Her enthusiasm in understanding the unique angles she was exploring was contagious and left me energized, thinking differently about design each time. What a rare treat it was to be able to escape the day to day routine and have a few minutes of thought provoking discussion to remind me of all the reasons I became a designer. Bruce Nussbaum, writer The truth is, I did not know Linda personally but professionally. She was my only real competitor covering the juncture of business and design, and I followed her work obsessively (because she kicked my butt consistently). So much written about Linda focusses on her warmth and humanity, and I'm sure that's true. But the Linda that was in my life was the killer journalist who had the best sources and wrote the deepest analyses of the most important design issues of the moment. She saw design in terms of relevance to people and tools to solve social problems. I saw Linda's immense humanity through the lens of her work. She made me a better journalist and a better person. Clive Roux, CEO, The Society for Experiential Graphic Design Few people from the media understand the role of design like Linda did. That's a fact. However, what is perhaps less understood is the role Linda played FOR designers. She was trusted. We're ideas and picture people. Words escape us usually. Linda had our back there. What made her stand apart was that she did not view design as another topic to be milked. She really believed in the power of good that it could do in the world. Danielle Sacks, senior editor, Inc. The first time I encountered Linda Tischler was through her words. I was 25, and had just started my first journalism job as a lowly fact checker at Fast Company. I was fact checking a colorful profile on Howard Dean’s campaign manager, Joe Trippi, written by a senior writer at the magazine—Linda Tischler—who I had yet to meet. I was taken with the story’s attitude, its writerly flair. I needed to meet this Linda woman. Little did I know that Linda and I would soon become fast friends, despite the years between us. She became the person I decided I wanted to become when I "grew up." As a young writer, she always took me seriously as a peer, even though I was learning what she had already been doing for decades. When she began immersing herself more deeply in the design world, she let me pick up the pieces of the advertising beat, which she had once carved out for herself. But she graciously relished in watching me take it on, and we’d gab endlessly about stories and reporting strategies and industry scuttlebutt. She was able to do what very few writers can—she wrote just as she spoke. When you read her work, you could hear her whispering in your ear—her sharp sense of humor, her wit, her word choices, her energetic voice always filled equally with edge and compassion. She’d pluck a word out of thin air that wouldn’t reveal pretension, but her dimension, her worldliness, her many selves as a lover of language, of culture, of the arts. And she was timeless, ageless. Her stories had the hipness and energy of a twentysomething, with the depth and perspective of a much wiser soul. She could go head to head with anyone—and you’d want to be a fly on the wall to watch. Thirteen years since we first met, Linda is still the woman I want to be when I grow up. She managed to raise two children whom she was fiercely protective of, become a grandmother (albeit, too briefly), a domestic goddess and a feminist, and a successful career journalist who left the field different than she found it. She has helped me navigate my journalistic career with two young kids, just as she did. She has been an incredible friend, making me laugh even during her darkest days with cancer. From a hospital bed, she managed to turn the most mundane, ugly moments into a rollicking, laugh out loud story. It’s hard to imagine a world without another Linda Tischler conversation. Chuck Salter, senior editor, Fast Company For years, I had the best seat at Fast Company’s New York offices: the one next to Linda Tischler. Our friendship traced back to the magazine’s early years, when we bonded over our newspaper backgrounds. But we had always worked out of different cities. In New York, we became next-desk neighbors. Hearing Linda do countless interviews gave me a deeper appreciation of her craft—how she tirelessly developed and worked her design beat, how quickly she thought on her feet to dig another layer deep, and how she treated people. No wonder her subjects trusted her enough to open up: She was fearlessly human—candid, curious, funny, empathetic. Long before facing cancer herself, she wrote memorably about the professional and personal impact of the disease on the designer Michael Graves and IDEO’s Tom Kelley. Linda was a generous spirit in a business that’s often competitive and territorial. She shared sources, story ideas, an honest critique — and so much of her time. Her gushy emails when she connected you to a source could make you blush. As anyone who knew her will attest, Linda was a force. A veteran journalist wired with the energy of a 25-year-old. A critical and creative thinker. A prolific and elegant writer. A devoted friend. My inbox is filled with emails that start more or less, "How are you?"—after a big story, the birth of my son, my mom’s heart surgery. Being friends with Linda made you almost like another beat that she followed with the utmost attention. I will miss her terribly. Fortunately, her voice remains, not just in her stories, but in our wonderfully rambling email conversations over 16 years. In recent years, although I knew she was often struggling with chemo or pain, she sounded as vibrant and irreverent as ever. In December, she joked that the implant she was getting for pain might let her stream the new season of "Transparent." Cancer took her life but not her soul, and definitely not her humor. She wouldn’t let it. That much was clear from one of her earlier notes to me following her diagnosis: And later, from another note: That was, and to my mind, will always be, Linda. Ravi Sawhney, founder, RKS Linda Tischler was such an incredible person, one of the truly inspirational, loving, insightful and passionate ones. There was a certain spirituality in Linda that I always wanted to be close to and valued dearly. She showed incredible strength and optimism as she battled her cancer, never giving up. I feel blessed to have crossed paths with her, to have become friends, and to have had many conversations about life, design, politics, and mortality. There are those who not only touch your life but somehow become part of the fabric of your world. Linda was such a person, as all her friends and family would tell you. She’ll be so dearly missed. Leslie Smolan, founding partner, Carbone Smolan Agency Linda Tischler was my design hero. She could also be called a design aficionado, advocate, supporter, inquirer, explorer, groupie, devotee, maniac, evangelist and connoisseur. She loved design and designers. And she loved to tell the world about us — what we do, why we do it, and why it matters. Losing Linda means we’ve lost an incredibly important voice in the ongoing dialogue about design. And we’ve lost an incredibly kind and generous friend. Bill Taylor, cofounder, Fast Company I’m sure that many of the tributes to and remembrances of Linda will focus on her wit and smarts, her mastery of design, and the legacy of articles and books she left behind. But as I have reflected over the last two days, saddened and stunned at her passing, I thought back to that often-repeated quote from Maya Angelou: "People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel." I will never forget how Linda made me, and all her colleagues in the early days of Fast Company, feel. She was an essential part of Fast Company during the crazy boom times, she was there for the dark and challenging down times, and she was my office next-door neighbor for a chunk of that time. Every single day, she was one of the few grown-ups in an organization filled (professionally speaking) with gangly adolescents. To many of the young people on the staff, she was a mentor and a sounding board. To me, she was a peer, a pal, a trusted colleague to whom I looked for advice and reassurance. Linda exuded a sense of quiet strength, of emotional and intellectual maturity, that is all-too-rare in the world in general, and in the world of media in particular. Those times when I would stroll into her office, pull up a chair, and say, simply "Do you have ten minutes to talk through something?" were some of the best times of my week. Truth be told, I can’t remember much of what she said in those conversations so many years ago, or what I did as a result of them. But I remember like yesterday how they made me feel. And I feel so blessed to have known and worked with Linda. Rick Tetzeli, editor-at-large, Fast Company When I came to Fast Company in 2010, I arrived with one question: Why does this magazine spend so much time on design coverage? It didn't take me long to figure out the answer, thanks to Linda. Editing her stories, and listening to her patient, humorous, skeptical, and good-natured explanations, I came to understand that the best design writing shows readers how gnarly problems get solved creatively. Linda had been doing this for years—she was a real pioneer. But she was wide open to telling those stories in new ways. One of my favorite experiences with her was working together on a story about architect Bjarke Ingels. As we discussed Ingels, she talked about his energy, his intellectual agility, his almost superhuman capacity for complex projects across the world. We decided that the best way to tell the story was through a comic strip, and the result was one of the freshest things I've worked on at Fast Company. The story delighted Linda, who loved the challenge of continually expressing herself—and highlighting work she deeply admired—in new ways. At its best, Fast Company encourages original thinking across creative enterprises. Linda lived this. My daughters attend a school that's just a couple of blocks from Ingels' recently completed apartment complex on West 57th Street in Manhattan, which was featured in our comic strip. In the midst of that dreary neighborhood of glass blocks, Ingels' building stands out for its angular optimism, a bold, light and unusual burst of energy. Kind of like Linda. We will all miss her deeply. She had spirit to spare, and we are lucky she shared it with us. Alissa Walker, writer, Gizmodo (via Facebook) Even if you didn't know Linda Tischler you very likely read one of her stories in Fast Company over the years. She was a true champion of the design industry, introducing this sometimes complicated world to the mainstream press and explaining its importance in an incredibly accessible way. She was also a great friend and mentor to me in those early days of my writing career. I will never forget her pulling me aside at one of Fast Company's first design events—after she had moderated a panel with her signature quick wit—and telling me that us ladies in design had to stick together. I will miss reading her work and knowing she was always on my side. Alan Webber, cofounder, Fast Company Everyone knows that magazining is a team sport. That’s even more true in the early days of a magazine, when it takes everyone on the team to figure out what it is you’re trying to do, not only in the pages of the magazine when it comes out, but also in the creation of the ideas that go into the magazine, the culture of the office where there’s no substitute for good energy, all the things that create magic and sustain it. That was Linda. She got it. She relished it, for the very first moment of the first day. It was like she’d been invited to be one of the hosts of the very best party you could ever hope to throw or attend. You could see it in her smile, her enthusiasm for the whole venture/adventure. Infectious energy, unstinting generosity, unlimited colleagueship—and of course, remarkable talent, curiosity, work ethic, and heart. One of the early tenets of Fast Company was that a great organization needs leaders at all levels. Linda was a leader—without seeking a leadership role. Sure, she was smart and able and good at her job. But the thing about Fast Company was, it never was all that clear what your job was, except to demonstrate every day that we were all in it together, and that none of us was as smart as all of us—and she was one of the people who lived that and made it happen. A magazine is the people who put it out. We were incredibly fortunate to have Linda to help put it out. I loved her then and I will always love her. If you'd like to share a story about Linda, email slabarre at fastcompany dot com.


Die Beiträge zur 2016 TISDC werden von einer erweiterten Jury aus 27 Experten bewertet, die Taiwans Designpotenzial in den Fokus stellen TAIPEH, Taiwan, 15. November 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Die Taiwan International Student Design Competition (TISDC) 2016, eine jährliche Veranstaltung, die von der Youth Development Administration, Ministry of Education (MOE; Bildungsministerium) organisiert und gemeinsam von der Sayling Wen Cultural & Educational Foundation und der iSee Taiwan Foundation gesponsert wird, hat im Hinblick auf Teilnahme und Prestige eindrucksvolle neue Maßstäbe gesetzt. Die TISDC 2016 konnte eine beispiellose Zahl von 14.858 Beiträgen in vier Auszeichnungskategorien und aus 882 Design-Ausbildungseinrichtungen anziehen, die in 69 verschiedenen Ländern und Regionen beheimatet sind. Das Werk „Borderlines", geschaffen von der jungen tschechischen Künstlerin Hanka Novakova, wurde aus 431 herausragenden Beiträgen der Endausscheidung für die TISDC Gold-Auszeichnung und den Bargeldpreis von 400.000 NT$ auserwählt. Zur renommierten Jury aus 27 TISDC-Juroren gehörten Vertreter von 15 internationalen Designorganisationen aus unterschiedlichen Disziplinen. Darunter waren auch der für den Oscar nominierte Animationsfilmer Konstantin Bronzit; der Storyboard-Künstler von Pixar, Dreamworks, und Disney sowie aktuelle Leiter von Graphic Subject Matter, Mike Cachuela; der ehemalige MUJI-Designberater und derzeitiges Vorstandsmitglied des Japan Institute of Design Promotion, Fumikazu Masuda; der Preisträger des Hong Kong Designers Association Lifetime Honorary Award, Kan Tai-keung; und der Mitgründer des Grass Jelly Studios und vielseitig talentierte Preisträger von MTV Europe Music, Golden Melody, und der Golden Horse Awards, Muh Chen. Die aktive Beteiligung dieser Fachleute hat den Horizont für die TISDC erweitert und die Veranstaltung als einen der Top-Designwettbewerbe der Welt für Studenten etabliert. TISDC-Koordinator Apex Lin wies darauf hin, dass die TISDC jetzt der weltweit größte Designwettbewerb für Studenten sei und eine außergewöhnliche Bühne für aufstrebende taiwanesische Talente darstelle, um prominente Designprofis auf dem gesamten Globus zu beeindrucken. Von der iSee Taiwan Foundation gesponserte spezielle Preiskategorie inspiriert aufstrebende Designstars weltweit, das kulinarische Erbe von Formosa zu unterstützen Durch seine Förderung von „Kultur, Tourismus und Innovation" setzt sich die iSee Taiwan Foundation regelmäßig dafür ein, Besucher aus aller Welt anzuziehen, um Taiwans einzigartigen Zauber zu erleben und zu genießen. Zu diesen wundervollen Charakteristiken gehört selbstverständlich auch Taiwans berühmtes kulinarisches Erbe und die Kochkunst. Dies war die Idee hinter der Schirmherrschaft der Stiftung für die neue Preiskategorie „Brand Specific" des TISCD: New Tableware Era -- Taiwan Cuisine Cutlery Design [Ein neues Zeitalter für Tischkultur: Der Designpreis für taiwanesisches Besteck]. Die Stiftung will mit der Brand-Specific-Auszeichnung kreative Neuinterpretationen der kulinarischen Tradition von Taiwan inspirieren - mit frischen Ideen und Kreativität, die auf vielfältige weltumspannende Perspektiven zurückgreift. Die 621 Beiträge zur Brand-Specific-Auszeichnung, eingereicht von Studenten aus Taiwan, Festlandchina, Singapur, Indien, Russland und Israel, erfassten auf fantasievolle Weise unterschiedliche Aspekte des kulinarischen Erbes von Taiwan. Nach einer länger dauernden Diskussion wählten die Jurymitglieder 60 Finalisten für die Kategorie aus und ernannten fünf gemeinsame Gewinner für die Gold-Auszeichnung. Zu diesen Gewinnern gehörten Ying-chun Lin, Wen-cheng Tian, Po-chun Chen, Guang-hong Yao und Ying-chih Wang, alle aus Taiwan und Festlandchina, die für ihre eindeutige „global-trifft-auf-lokal" Herangehensweise an das Design hochgelobt wurden. Don Chen, CEO der iSee Taiwan Foundation, erklärte, er freue sich darauf, dass die Brand-Specific-Auszeichnung die weltweite Wahrnehmung von Taiwans außergewöhnlichem und künstlerischem Erbe verstärkt und die vielfältigen Talente und Fähigkeiten des Kultur- und Kreativbereiches des Landes voranbringt. iSee Taiwan Foundation und Sayling Wen Cultural & Educational Foundation sind die Sponsoren des Global Talent Design Festival Die Sayling Wen Cultural & Educational Foundation organisierte das Global Talent Design Festival 2016 zusammen mit der iSee Taiwan Foundation als eine Plattform, die „Bildung, Innovation und Zuwendung" aufbauen und Humanität und eine innovative, warmherzige Gesellschaft weiter kultivieren soll, indem die disziplinübergreifende Idee einer zum Service-Design orientierten Ausbildung gefördert wird. Um das weltweite Profil der TISDC zu stärken, arbeitete die Sayling Wen Cultural & Educational Foundation mit dem MOE zusammen, um die Beteiligung von 15 internationalen Designorganisationen bei der finalen Jury-Entscheidung und den Preisverleihungen sicherzustellen. Diese 15 Organisationen umfassten die Brno Biennale Association, Good Design Australia, Hong Kong Federation of Design Associations, International Council of Societies of Industrial Design (ICSID), INDEX: Design to Improve Life, India Design Council, International Poster Biennial in Mexico, Japan Institute of Design Promotion, Korea Ensemble of Contemporary Design, Macau Designers Association, Taiwan Design Center, Thailand Creative & Design Center, South African Bureau of Standards Design Institute, Design Business Chamber Singapore und der Deutsche Rat für Formgebung. Jeter Her, Vorstandsmitglied und amtierender Hauptgeschäftsführer der Sayling Wen Cultural & Educational Foundation, erklärt, dass es die Zielsetzung der Stiftung sei, das Festival und die damit zusammenhängenden Aktivitäten zu einer effektiven Plattform für die 15 Partner aufzubauen, um einen konstruktiven Dialog zwischen Design-Fachleuten und Wissenschaftlern in Taiwan und international anzustoßen. In Zusammenarbeit mit dem Bildungsministerium unterstützen die iSee Taiwan Foundation und die Sayling Wen Cultural & Educational Foundation die TISDC auch weiterhin. In diesem Jahr wurde die Unterstützung auf das 2016 Global Talent Design Festival (GTDF) ausgedehnt. Das Festival bietet eine neue und inspirierende Reihe von designrelevanten Aktivitäten, darunter: 1) das International Masters Joint University Forum, zu dem Vertreter wichtiger Designorganisationen aus der ganzen Welt eingeladen werden, um taiwanesische Designstudenten und Lehrende in aktuelle, interaktive Diskussionen einzubinden, die Taiwans dienstleistungsorientierte Stärken hervorheben und fördern, 2) das International VIP Cultural Tour Programm, das Designfachleute, die in Zusammenhang mit dem TISDC Taiwan besuchen, auf thematischen Führungen der taiwanesischen Gesellschaft und Kultur begleitet, und 3) die Industry Joint Reception, bei der die Taiwan innewohnende Eleganz und Schönheit hervorgehoben werden. Sie stellen für die nationale Designbranche unerschöpfliche Quellen der Inspiration dar und sind das Fundament für die laufenden Bestrebungen zur Präsentation und Förderung der Stärken des taiwanesischen Designs vor einem weltweiten Publikum.


TAIPEI, Taiwan, Nov. 14, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Taiwan International Student Design Competition (TISDC) 2016, an annual event that is organized by the Youth Development Administration, Ministry of Education (MOE), and sponsored jointly by Sayling Wen Cultural & Educational Foundation and iSee Taiwan Foundation, has set impressive new milestones in terms of participation and prestige. TISDC 2016 attracted an unprecedented 14,858 entries in four award categories from 882 design schools located in 69 different countries and regions. "Borderlines", created by the young Czech artist Hanka Novakova, was chosen from among 431 exceptional finalist entries for the TISDC Gold Prize and a cash award of NT$400,000. The distinguished panel of 27 TISDC jurors included the representatives of 15 international design organizations from a variety of disciplines. Among the latter were animator and Oscar nominee Konstantin Bronzit; Pixar, Dreamworks, and Disney storyboard artist and current head of Graphic Subject Matter Mike Cachuela; former MUJI design consultant and current Japan Institute of Design Promotion Board Member Fumikazu Masuda; Hong Kong Designers Association Lifetime Honorary Award recipient Kan Tai-keung; and Grass Jelly Studio co-founder and multitalented winner of MTV Europe Music, Golden Melody, and Golden Horse awards Muh Chen. The active participation of these professionals has broadened TISDC's horizons and established TISDC as one of the world's top student design competitions. TISDC coordinator Apex Lin notes that TISDC is now the world's largest design competition for students, providing an exceptional stage for up-and-coming Taiwanese talent to impress prominent design professionals across the globe. In promoting "culture, tourism, and innovation," the iSee Taiwan Foundation regularly works to attract visitors from around the world to experience and enjoy Taiwan's many unique charms. These charms naturally include Taiwan's celebrated culinary heritage and cuisine, which were the inspirations for the foundation's sponsorship of the new TISDC "Brand Specific" awards category: New Tableware Era -- Taiwan Cuisine Cutlery Design. The foundation looks to the Brand Specific award to inspire creative reinterpretations of Taiwan's culinary heritage using fresh ideas and creativity that draw on myriad global perspectives. The 621 entries for the Brand Specific award, submitted by students from Taiwan, mainland China, Singapore, India, Russia, and Israel, creatively captured various aspects of Taiwan's culinary heritage. After prolonged deliberation, the jurors selected 60 category finalists and named 5 joint Gold Prize winners, including Ying-chun Lin, Wen-cheng Tian, Po-chun Chen, Guang-hong Yao, and Ying-chih Wang, all from Taiwan and mainland China, who were lauded for their macroscopic, "global-meets-local" approach to design. iSee Taiwan Foundation CEO Don Chen expressed that he looks forward to the Brand Specific award boosting global awareness of Taiwan's exceptional cultural and artistic heritage as well as the extensive talent and capabilities of its cultural and creative industry. Sayling Wen Cultural & Educational Foundation co-organized the Global Talent Design Festival 2016 with iSee Taiwan Foundation as a platform to further "education, innovation, and care" and further cultivate humanity and an innovative, benevolent society through promoting the cross-disciplinary idea of service design education. To raise the global profile of the TISDC, Sayling Wen Cultural & Educational Foundation worked with the MOE to secure the participation of 15 international design organizations in final judging and award presentations. These 15 organizations included the Brno Biennale Association, Good Design Australia, Hong Kong Federation of Design Associations, International Council of Societies of Industrial Design (ICSID), INDEX: Design to Improve Life, India Design Council, International Poster Biennial in Mexico, Japan Institute of Design Promotion, Korea Ensemble of Contemporary Design, Macau Designers Association, Taiwan Design Center, Thailand Creative & Design Center, South African Bureau of Standards Design Institute, Design Business Chamber Singapore, and German Design Council. Sayling Wen Cultural & Educational Foundation Board Member & Acting Chief Executive Jeter Her states that the aim of the foundation is to turn the festival and related activities into an effective platform for the 15 partners to elicit meaningful dialogue between design professionals and scholars in Taiwan and internationally. iSee Taiwan Foundation and Sayling Wen Cultural & Educational Foundation continue to support the TISDC in cooperation with the Ministry of Education. This year, their support has expanded to include the 2016 Global Talent Design Festival (GTDF). The festival offers a new and stimulating array of design-related activities, including: 1) The International Masters Joint University Forum, which will invite representatives from major design organizations worldwide to engage Taiwanese design students and faculty in topical, interactive discussions that spotlight and promote Taiwan's service-oriented strengths; 2) The International VIP Cultural Tour program, which will take visiting design professionals who are in Taiwan for the TISDC on in-depth, topical tours of Taiwan society and culture; and 3) The Industry Joint Reception, which will highlight Taiwan's innate elegance and beauty, which are inexhaustible sources of inspiration for the domestic design industry and the bedrock of ongoing efforts to showcase and promote Taiwan's design strengths to a global audience.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

“Valentine’s Day is one of the biggest, busiest flower holidays of the year for the 40 flower vendors at California Flower Mall. The Society of American Florists estimates 250 million roses are produced for this one day. It’s is the number one holiday for florists and for wholesale cut flower purchases, representing 26% of all holiday transactions. Seasonal holiday staff must be trained quickly to fill orders for the most popular gift of the season - roses. Petalers here suggest using Leanne Kessler, director of the Floral Design Institute recent Valentine’s Rose Care web series to learn how care for bundled roses to ensure their quality and freshness,” says Vanina Trogolo, spokesperson for California Flower Mall. The web series shows what to do to prepare a bundle of flower market roses or what to ask CFM petalers to do to prepare them for arranging. “Bundled roses arrive from farms asleep in 41 degree cold storage, like any living thing they need care, food and water to awaken their full beauty. Many CFM petalers have staff that will open a rose bundle and condition the roses for customers if they know to ask them,” says Trogolo. Kessler gives the following rose care advice to florists, seasonal workers and DIY flower lovers: CFM is open all night before Valentine’s Day and extended hours on the days leading up to the Valentine's marathon. Special Valentine's hours are: Thursday, Feb.9 – 4:30 am- 6 pm; Friday, Saturday & Sunday Feb. 10, 11, 12 – 4:30 am-8 pm; Monday, Feb. 13 – 4:30 am open 24 hours until Valentine’s Day Tuesday Feb 14 until 8 pm. The California Flower Mall, located at 825 San Pedro Street with parking at the 824 San Julian Street entrance, is one of the largest DIY wholesale flower markets in the eight block Downtown LA Flower District trade community -- the largest concentration of wholesale flower markets and flower businesses in the U.S. It is located in the LA Fashion District Business Improvement District. CFM customer amenities include an ATM, cafe, public restrooms, and on-site parking. Visit CFM at http://www.californiaflowermall.com


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

WCX 17: SAE World Congress Experience—SAE International’s completely transformed, signature event taking place April 4-6, 2017 at the Cobo Center in Detroit—has selected Mr. Yu Kai, President of China Automotive Technology and Research Center, Vice Chairman of China Association of Automobile Manufacturers, Deputy Chairman of SAE-China and Committee Member of China Machinery Industry Federation as the keynote speaker for Wednesday, April 5. During his presentation, Mr. Kai will go in depth about the latest developments and prospects of the burgeoning Chinese auto industry. Facing challenges such as increasing traffic and environmental concerns, the Chinese market has, after 10 years of rapid development, shifted to a slower rate of growth. Engineers in China are working toward vehicle electrification, smart and connected vehicles and sustainable development surrounding new energy vehicles. “We’re honored to have such a forward-looking, respected thought leader address WCX,” says David L. Schutt, Ph.D., Chief Executive Officer of SAE International. “The technical innovation coming out of the Chinese mobility sector is fascinating and I look forward to hearing more about what the future holds.” Mr. Kai’s vast experience includes time as President of the Fifth Design Institute under the Ministry of Machinery Industry, Board Member and Vice General Manager of China United Engineering Corporation, Vice General Manager of China Automotive Industry Engineering Corporation, among other positions. He began his career as an engineer and researcher. Serving as a global nexus for industry leaders, inventors, and disruptors from Detroit to Silicon Valley and everywhere in-between, WCX promises a full-spectrum, full-sensory interactive experience, uniting the mobility industry’s best talent from innovation hubs around the world for three days of active learning, high-powered collaboration, and technological discovery. In 2016, SAE World Congress drew more than 11,000 attendees from the automotive industry. As the event evolves into WCX: SAE World Congress Experience spanning the entire mobility industry, even more engineers, engineering managers, executives, academics, government/military officials, and consultants will attend. Ford Motor Company will provide Executive Leadership and DENSO will serve as the Tier One Strategic Partner for WCX. For more information, or to register: http://www.wcx17.org/register/ SAE International is a global association committed to being the ultimate knowledge source for the engineering profession. By uniting over 127,000 engineers and technical experts, we drive knowledge and expertise across a broad spectrum of industries. We act on two priorities: encouraging a lifetime of learning for mobility engineering professionals and setting the standards for industry engineering. We strive for a better world through the work of our philanthropic SAE Foundation, including programs like A World in Motion® and the Collegiate Design Series™.


Li A.,Xi'an University of Architecture and Technology | Qin E.,Xi'an University of Architecture and Technology | Qin E.,Wuhan Design Engineering Co. | Xin B.,Xi'an University of Architecture and Technology | And 2 more authors.
Energy Conversion and Management | Year: 2010

Hohhot hydropower station is being built from the year of 2007. There are many complicated heating facilities and equipment in the powerhouse, such as electricity generators and transformer. The air distribution of the powerhouse is affected by the complex heat sources. In this paper the model size is 1/50 of the real scale and 2D-PIV is used to study the air distribution in the model of large underground space. The supply outlet is located on the roof and the heat source is located on the floor. The different supply air conditions and heat release rate are discussed. Three air supply are discussed: v/v0 = 0.75, v/v0 = 1, v/v0 = 1.25 (v0 is designed air supply speed, v0 = 0.94 m/s). And we also carry out three heat release rates: Q/Q0 = 0.75, Q/Q0 = 1, Q/Q0 = 1.25 (Q0 is designed heat release rate, Q0 = 7.12 W). The results show that the supply air velocity has a remarkable effect on air distribution characteristics of the large space and occupant zone velocity. However, it is also observed that the heat release rate has little effect on air distribution of large space and occupant zone velocity. The air supply velocity and the air inlet location should be paid more attention in designing air distribution. The experimental findings are useful for optimizing the design of air distribution in a large space with complex heat sources. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Internationally recognized fine jewelry designer, Kristin Hanson, will be teaching a four-session course, curated for jewelry designers at the New York Jewelry Design Institute (NYJDI). Putting the spotlight on students looking to develop their own signature collection of fine jewelry. Hanson’s class will help identify the source of inspiration needed to make a trademark style. Through concept development, by means of art, structure and form, the lessons will explore the design process. Finding the right materials, defining inspiration, and storytelling through a portfolio while elementally standing out will all be explored. “Become a jewelry architect. Learn techniques that will generate your next trend setting collection by focusing on the art of your own style. Create a portfolio that will become the blueprints of your brand," says Kristin Hanson. She adds, “I am very excited to bring this new educational program to the jewelry industry. Students will have the opportunity discover their own creative potential while learning fun specialized techniques.” Born in Montclair, New Jersey, Kristin Hanson ventured out to Colorado at the age of 17. Tucked away in the Rocky Mountains, she studied one-on-one with master jeweler, Harold O’Connor, and later moved to the Alchimia contemporary jewelry school in Florence, Italy. There, she apprenticed with Giampaulo Babetto, and learned a foundational approach, while curating her own contemporary signature forms, learning to preserve classical European goldsmith techniques while accentuating the innate beauty of rare, naturally colored diamonds. Over the years, Hanson’s jewelry, and dedicated work as an educator and diamond specialist evolved, and she has received international recognition as a leader in the fine jewelry industry. Today, her collections are available in Neiman Marcus department stores across the country. Hanson’s course at the NYJDI will be a firsthand experience for designers who want to curate their signature look that will stand out in the industry. Discover how to make your collection unique to your own personal style. Learn fun exercises and techniques that will transform your jewelry concepts into art. In this class students will work with a number of mediums including drawing, painting, photography, collage, video and sculpture. Jenine Lepera Izzi, Creative Director of NYJDI, says, “Kristin adds a layer of sophistication to designing jewelry. She brings expansive knowledge to our classroom, and our students will greatly benefit from her worldly experience as an award winning jewelry designer, teacher and entrepreneur.” Create Your Own Signature Collection, with Kristin Hanson, is a four-session course that will take place every Tuesday from March 28, 2017 through April 18, 2017 from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., at NYJDI. For more information about the courses, contact NYJDI 212-951-1314 or email info(at)nyjdi(dot)com. For more information about this release, contact info(at)pietrapr(dot)com or call 212-913-9761. About NYJDI An educational haven for budding designers and jewelry pros looking to enhance their skills, the New York Jewelry Design Institute was founded in 2013 by Jenine Lepera Izzi, an interior designer turned jewelry designer who was inspired to pursue the field while living in Florence, Italy. The school was conceived out of a passion for design; a belief that the same design process used by the world’s leading artists and designers could be applied to the jewelry industry. The school has since expanded the curriculum to include many new practical courses. About Kristin Hanson Kristin has been creating and teaching jewelry since she was a child. Her exploration of jewelry started with glass beads and wire, and she now specializes in fancy color diamonds and platinum jewelry. Although her materials may have evolved, her art is very similar.

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