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Vercelli M.,Descriptive Epidemiology Unit | Vercelli M.,University of Genoa | Lillini R.,Descriptive Epidemiology Unit | Lillini R.,Vita-Salute San Raffaele University | And 2 more authors.
Cancer Epidemiology | Year: 2012

Aim: The main aim of this work is to compute expected cancer survival for Italian provinces by Socio-Economic and health Resources and Technologic Supplies (SERTS) models, based on demographic, socioeconomic variables and information describing the health care system (SEH). Methods: Five-year age-standardised relative survival rates by gender for 11 cancer sites and all cancers combined of patients diagnosed in 1995-1999, were obtained from the Italian Association of Cancer Registries (CRs) database. The SEH variables describe at provincial level macro-economy, demography, labour market, health resources in 1995-2005. A principal components factor analysis was applied to the SEH variables to control their strong mutual correlation. For every considered cancer site, linear regression models were estimated considering the 5-RS% as dependent variable and the principal components factors of the SEH variables as independent variables. Results: The model composition was correlated to the characteristics of take in charge of patients. SEH factors were correlated with the observed survival for all cancer combined and colon-rectum in both sexes, prostate, kidney and non Hodgkin's lymphomas in men, breast, corpus uteri and melanoma in women (R2 from 40% to 85%). In the provinces without any CR the survival was very similar with that of neighbouring provinces with analogous social, economic and health characteristics. Conclusions: The SERTS models allowed us to interpret the survival outcome of oncologic patients with respect to the role of the socio-economic and health related system characteristics, stressing how the peculiarities of the take in charge at the province level could address the decisions regarding the allocation of resources. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Vercelli M.,University of Genoa | Lillini R.,University of Genoa | Lillini R.,Descriptive Epidemiology Unit | Lillini R.,Vita-Salute San Raffaele University | And 5 more authors.
International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health | Year: 2013

The aim of the present study was to evaluate, by Join Point regression method, the yearly variations in demographic indices and mortality data in Italy from 1901 to 2008, as related to the caloric intake. The relationships between mortality and caloric intake were studied by time series. The results showed that, from 1901 to 2008, the Italian population grew from 32.5 to 59.6 millions; the live births rates decreased from 31.8 to 10.1‰ (males) and from 33.3 to 9.0‰ (females); the infant mortality rates fell from 184.1 to 3.7‰ (males) and from 149.4 to 3.2‰ (females); males and females gained 35.7 and 40.6 years in life expectancy at birth, respectively. In 1901 the 61% of deaths occurred in the youngest, whereas in 2008 the elderly accounted for the 80%. In 1901, in terms of age-adjusted data, other and undefined causes overcame the specific causes of death, whose rank was: respiratory, digestive, infectious, cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, cancers, accidents, endocrine, and nervous system diseases. In 2008, undefined causes ranked 3rd (males) and 4th (females), while cancers became the leading cause of death, followed by cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, accidental, respiratory, endocrine, digestive, nervous system, and infectious diseases. The caloric intake showed a negative correlation with all-cause mortality, infant mortality, and mortality for a number of specific causes. These patterns reflect the progress in average nutritional status, lifestyle quality, socioeconomic level, and hygienic conditions. © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. Source


Vercelli M.,Descriptive Epidemiology Unit | Vercelli M.,University of Genoa | Lillini R.,Descriptive Epidemiology Unit | Lillini R.,National Institute of Health | And 11 more authors.
Tumori | Year: 2014

Background and aims: Few studies deal with the association of socioeconomic and health system resource variables with cancer survival at the Italian regional level, where the greatest number of decisions about social and health policies and resource allocations are taken. The present study aimed to describe the causal relationships between socioeconomic and health system resource factors and regional cancer survival and to compute the expected cancer survival at provincial, regional and area levels.Methods and study design: Age-standardized relative survival at 5 years from diagnosis of cases incident in 1995-1998 and followed up to 2004 were derived by gender for 11 sites from the Italian Association of Cancer Registries data bank. The socioeconomic and health system resource variables, describing at a regional level the macroeconomy, demography, labor market, and health resources for 1995-2005, came from the Health for All database. A principal components factor analysis was applied to the socioeconomic and health system resource variables. For every site, linear regression models were computed considering the relative survival at 5 years as a dependent variable and the principal components factor analysis factors as independent variables.Results: The factors described the socioeconomic and health-related features of the regional systems and were causally related to the characteristics of the patient taken in charge. The models built by the factors allowed computation of the expected relative survival at 5 years with very good concordance with those observed at regional, macro-regional and national levels. In the regions without any cancer registry, survival was coherent with that of neighboring regions with similar socioeconomic and health system resources characteristics.Conclusions: The models highlighted the causal correlations between socioeconomic and health system resources and cancer survival, suggesting that they could be good evaluation tools for the efficiency of the resources allocation and use. Source

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