West Des Moines, IA, United States

Des Moines University

www.dmu.edu
West Des Moines, IA, United States

Des Moines University is an osteopathic medical college located in Des Moines, in the U.S. state of Iowa. Des Moines University is the second oldest osteopathic medical school and the fifteenth largest medical school in the United States. There are 14,124 total alumni .The university is accredited by the American Osteopathic Association's Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation and by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Wikipedia.


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Company Continues to Provide High Efficiency LED Lighting Solutions to Reduce Operating Costs, and Improve Light Quality and Safety Throughout Public Schools Nationally STAMFORD, CT--(Marketwired - February 08, 2017) - Revolution Lighting Technologies, Inc. ( : RVLT) ("Revolution Lighting"), a global provider of advanced LED lighting solutions, today announced that it has recently secured LED lighting contracts totaling approximately $4 million, including school districts within New Jersey, Connecticut and Rhode Island. Revolution Lighting's operating divisions, Energy Source and Tri-State LED provided "turnkey" services that began with a comprehensive assessment to establish the most energy efficient program, installing Revolution Lighting's high performance LED tubes and Eco thin panel fixtures. These LED solutions deliver superior efficiency to reduce lighting energy use by more than 60%, while increasing light output for enhanced safety and higher quality learning environments for students. Additionally, its LED lighting lasts three times longer than conventional fluorescent lighting, combined with Revolution Lighting's market-leading 10-year warranty, to provide significant long-term operational and maintenance cost savings. Revolution Lighting offers a broad line of high quality LED solutions, including tubes, Eco thin panels, troffer fixtures, high bays, area flood lighting and wall pack fixtures to address the various lighting requirements throughout primary and secondary education facilities. This includes hallways, classrooms, administrative areas, support spaces, and cafeterias, in addition to exterior applications such as parking, pedestrian walkways, and security and emergency lighting. "These recent program wins, coupled with previous 2016 LED retrofit project awards among primary and higher education institutions, including Lehman College and Des Moines University, exceed $20 million, demonstrating our leadership in this important market," said Robert V. LaPenta, CEO and Chairman of Revolution Lighting. "We anticipate several additional awards near term in the Connecticut, Boston and New Jersey school systems as the school boards recognize the health, learning and financial benefits of LED lighting." According to the Department of Energy, lighting is the second largest source of energy use in K-12 schools, behind only space heating and cooling. As cited throughout a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency report, school buildings are often able to achieve upwards of greater than 40% energy cost savings through lighting installations and retrofits. With approximately 98,000 public schools and 4,600 colleges and universities nationwide, energy efficient lighting solutions represent a tremendous market opportunity for Revolution Lighting. Please visit our website at www.rvlti.com or contact 1-877-578-2536 (support@rvlti.com) for more information about how Revolution Lighting can support your lighting retrofit project. Revolution Lighting Technologies, Inc. is a leader in the design, manufacture, marketing, and sale of LED lighting solutions focusing on the industrial, commercial and government markets in the United States, Canada, and internationally. Through advanced LED technologies, Revolution Lighting has created an innovative lighting company that offers a comprehensive advanced product platform of high-quality interior and exterior LED lamps and fixtures, including signage and control systems. Revolution Lighting is uniquely positioned to act as an expert partner, offering full service lighting solutions through our operating divisions including Energy Source, Value Lighting, Tri-State LED, E-Lighting, All-Around Lighting and TNT Energy to transform lighting into a source of superior energy savings, quality light and well-being. Revolution Lighting Technologies markets and distributes its products through a network of regional and national independent sales representatives and distributors, as well as through energy savings companies and national accounts. Revolution Lighting Technologies trades on the NASDAQ under the ticker RVLT. For more information, please visit www.rvlti.com and connect with the Company on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.


Company continues to provide high efficiency LED lighting solutions to reduce operating costs and improve light quality within public schools; has completed more than $13.3M in education work throughout 2016 STAMFORD, CT--(Marketwired - October 31, 2016) - Revolution Lighting Technologies, Inc. ( : RVLT) ("Revolution Lighting"), a global provider of advanced LED lighting solutions, today announced that it has recently been awarded LED lighting contracts within public education facilities totaling $2.7M. Recent awards include 26 schools within the Providence, Rhode Island school system, as well as multiple school projects within New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut. Revolution Lighting operating divisions were key components in securing and executing these projects; Energy Source led the work for the Providence, RI school system, while Tri-State LED was responsible for the projects in NJ, NY, and CT. This follows an award of $2.25M for public education work in NJ and Pennsylvania announced earlier in 2016. The 26 school LED lighting retrofit projects within Providence, RI, includes the installation of more than 10,000 of Revolution Lighting's LED tubes throughout various areas including hallways, classrooms, administrative areas, support spaces, and cafeterias. Exterior applications will also be addressed including parking, pedestrian walkways, security and emergency lighting. The incorporation of LED lighting will improve light output within classrooms to provide higher quality learning environments for students, while increasing lighting efficiency by 60%. With LED lighting lasting three times longer than conventional fluorescent lighting, and the Company's market leading 10-year warranty for its LED tube products, Providence's schools will experience significant long-term operational and maintenance cost savings. "As the leading LED provider among public education, we are excited to partner with our latest schools to incorporate our high efficiency LED lighting solutions," said Robert V. LaPenta, CEO and Chairman of Revolution Lighting. "These projects demonstrate Revolution Lighting's unique expertise and continued success, partnering with schools to maximize economic performance, exceed environmental initiatives and enhance safety and well-being for students and faculty." These projects continue Revolution Lighting's success within the education sector, as the Company has now completed more than $13.3M of work in 2016. This includes completed LED retrofits for Ideal Academy charter school, Lehman College and Des Moines University. This market penetration is expected to continue as both primary and higher educational facilities aim to replace antiquated lighting systems with energy efficient LED solutions, capitalizing on available incentives and low-interest financing opportunities to significantly reduce project payback. According to the Department of Energy, lighting is the second largest source of energy use in K-12 schools, behind only space heating and cooling. As cited throughout a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency report, school buildings are often able to achieve upwards of greater than 40% energy cost savings through lighting installations and retrofits. With approximately 98,000 public schools and 4,600 colleges and universities nationwide, energy efficient lighting solutions represent a tremendous market opportunity for Revolution Lighting. Please visit our website at www.rvlti.com or contact 1-877-578-2536 (support@rvlti.com) for more information about how Revolution Lighting can support your lighting retrofit project. About Revolution Lighting Technologies Inc. Revolution Lighting Technologies, Inc. is a leader in the design, manufacture, marketing, and sale of LED lighting solutions focusing on the industrial, commercial and government markets in the United States, Canada, and internationally. Through advanced LED technologies, Revolution Lighting has created an innovative lighting company that offers a comprehensive advanced product platform of high-quality interior and exterior LED lamps and fixtures, including signage and control systems. Revolution Lighting is uniquely positioned to act as an expert partner, offering full service lighting solutions through our operating divisions including Energy Source, Value Lighting, Tri-State LED, E-Lighting, All-Around Lighting and TNT Energy to transform lighting into a source of superior energy savings, quality light and well-being. Revolution Lighting Technologies markets and distributes its products through a network of regional and national independent sales representatives and distributors, as well as through energy savings companies and national accounts. Revolution Lighting Technologies trades on the NASDAQ under the ticker RVLT. For more information, please visit www.rvlti.com and connect with the Company on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.


GREATER DES MOINES, Iowa, May 9, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Nearly 200 of Greater Des Moines' (DSM's) business and community leaders will present a federal agenda and promote regional priorities and economic development plans during DMDC 2017. The Partnership will host its 38th annual trip to Washington, D.C. on May 10 through 12. DMDC is sponsored by presenting sponsor Shazam. Throughout the three-day trip, the region's leaders will meet with members of Iowa's Congressional delegation, the Administration and their staffs. The Partnership will also host Congressional staff policy meetings addressing priorities for Des Moines including: agbiotechnology, conservation and flood mitigation, education, transportation funding, trade, immigration, quality of life initiatives and critical health care hospitals. The DMDC 2017 public policy agenda and a trip itinerary may be found here. Attendees will hear from keynote speakers including U.S. Senator Tom Cotton of Arkansas, U.S. Senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut and George Sifakis, Assistant to the President and Director of the Office of Public Liaison at the White House. Additionally, the Embassy of Canada will host the DMDC 2017 Iowa Congressional Reception, sponsored by Prairie Meadows. Canada is Iowa's top trade partner with total bilateral trade equaling $5.9 billion. "Our regional presence at DMDC is powerful and makes a statement to our federal elected officials," said Don Pearson, Regional President at Wells Fargo and the Greater Des Moines Partnership's 2017 Board Chair. "DMDC is a great opportunity for attendees to connect with Congress and the Administration on issues and projects impacting our region, and attendees are also able to form and strengthen relationships with each other." DMDC convenes nearly 200 of the region's business and community leaders each year to present a federal agenda and promote regional priorities and economic development plans, representing one of the nation's largest Chamber of Commerce fly-ins. While in the nation's capital, participants will advocate for key issues facing Greater Des Moines. 2017 sponsors include Shazam, Prairie Meadows, Wells Fargo, Nyemaster Good P.C. The Weitz Company, DART, Innovate Iowa, Delta Dental, Principal, Policy Works, Brown Winick Law Firm, Davis Brown Law Firm, the Des Moines Area Metropolitan Planning Organization and Des Moines University. About the Greater Des Moines Partnership The Greater Des Moines Partnership is the economic and community development organization that serves Greater Des Moines (DSM), Iowa. Together with 23 Affiliate Chambers of Commerce and more than 6,000 regional business members, The Partnership drives economic growth with one voice, one mission and as one region. Through innovation, strategic planning and global collaboration, The Partnership grows opportunity, helps create jobs and promotes Des Moines as the best place to build a business, a career and a future. Learn more at DSMpartnership.com.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Attendees will hear from keynote speakers including U.S. Senator Tom Cotton of Arkansas, U.S. Senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut and George Sifakis, Assistant to the President and Director of the Office of Public Liaison at the White House. Additionally, the Embassy of Canada will host the DMDC 2017 Iowa Congressional Reception, sponsored by Prairie Meadows. Canada is Iowa's top trade partner with total bilateral trade equaling $5.9 billion. "Our regional presence at DMDC is powerful and makes a statement to our federal elected officials," said Don Pearson, Regional President at Wells Fargo and the Greater Des Moines Partnership's 2017 Board Chair. "DMDC is a great opportunity for attendees to connect with Congress and the Administration on issues and projects impacting our region, and attendees are also able to form and strengthen relationships with each other." DMDC convenes nearly 200 of the region's business and community leaders each year to present a federal agenda and promote regional priorities and economic development plans, representing one of the nation's largest Chamber of Commerce fly-ins. While in the nation's capital, participants will advocate for key issues facing Greater Des Moines. 2017 sponsors include Shazam, Prairie Meadows, Wells Fargo, Nyemaster Good P.C. The Weitz Company, DART, Innovate Iowa, Delta Dental, Principal, Policy Works, Brown Winick Law Firm, Davis Brown Law Firm, the Des Moines Area Metropolitan Planning Organization and Des Moines University. About the Greater Des Moines Partnership The Greater Des Moines Partnership is the economic and community development organization that serves Greater Des Moines (DSM), Iowa. Together with 23 Affiliate Chambers of Commerce and more than 6,000 regional business members, The Partnership drives economic growth with one voice, one mission and as one region. Through innovation, strategic planning and global collaboration, The Partnership grows opportunity, helps create jobs and promotes Des Moines as the best place to build a business, a career and a future. Learn more at DSMpartnership.com.


Peterson G.,Des Moines University
Annals of Medicine | Year: 2012

Diet, lifestyle modification, and pharmacotherapy with metformin are appropriate initial treatments for many patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). However, most individuals do not maintain glycemic control with metformin alone. Addition of other oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs), including sulfonylurea, meglitinide, or thiazolidinedione, is often the next step. Newer options, including incretin-based glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists (RAs) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, offer important benefits as monotherapies or in combination with OADs, with low risk for hypoglycemia. Reductions in glycated hemoglobin (A1C) have been reported among patients treated with GLP-1 RAs (exenatide,-0.8 to-1.1%; liraglutide,-0.8 to-1.6%), as has weight loss (exenatide,-1.6 to-3.1 kg; liraglutide,-1.6 to-3.2 kg). GLP-1 RAs also stimulate β-cell responses and have positive effects on cardiovascular risk factors often present in patients with T2DM. The most common adverse events associated with GLP-1 RAs are nausea, which diminishes over time, and hypoglycemia (when used in combination with a sulfonylurea). A large number of trials demonstrated benefits of GLP-1 RAs, suggesting they could provide suitable treatment options for patients with T2DM. © 2012 Informa UK, Ltd.


Peterson K.S.,Des Moines University
The Journal of foot and ankle surgery : official publication of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons | Year: 2010

Compared with traditional open arthrodesis, arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis has been associated with similar rates of fusion, decreased time to union, decreased pain, shorter hospital stay, earlier mobilization, reliable clinical results, and fewer complications. The aim of this case-control study was to analyze cost differences between outpatient arthroscopic and inpatient open ankle arthrodesis. To this end, the authors analyzed 20 ankle arthrodesis procedures: 10 performed by one surgeon on an inpatient basis using an open approach, and 10 performed by another surgeon on an outpatient basis arthroscopically. Patient age, body mass index, tourniquet time, length of stay, complications, days to clinical union, and insurance type, as well as charges and reimbursements for the surgeons and the hospital or surgery center were abstracted from the records. Statistically significant differences were observed between the outpatient arthroscopic and inpatient open arthrodesis groups for total site charges ($3898 +/- 0.00 versus $32,683 +/- $12,762, respectively, P < .0001), reimbursement to the surgeon ($1567 +/- $320 versus $1107 +/- $278, respectively, P = .003), and reimbursement to the hospital or ambulatory surgery center ($1110 +/- $287 versus $8432 +/- $2626, respectively); the ratio of hospital/surgery center charges to hospital/surgery center reimbursements was 28.48% for the inpatient arthroscopic group and 25.80% for the inpatient open arthrodesis group. Outpatient arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis, compared with inpatient open ankle arthrodesis, appears to be less expensive for third party payers, and surgeons are paid more, whereas hospitals and ambulatory surgical centers get paid a greater proportion of the charges that they bill. Copyright 2010 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: SEDIMENTARY GEO & PALEOBIOLOGY | Award Amount: 369.80K | Year: 2015

Non-technical abstract
The end of the ice age (about 11,000 years ago) was a time of radical change in North America. Many species of large mammals went extinct, along with their habitats. Climate played a major role in this extinction event and current climate change continues to affect and alter the world today. This project will analyze ancient DNA from ice age animals from Natural Trap Cave, Wyoming to examine how these past climate changes relate to genetic variability and extinction. This research will lead to a better overall understanding of how climate change is related to population structure, changes in genetic variation, and ultimately extinction, which may have potential effects on how biologists think about and mitigate the current human-caused climate change occurring today. This project will also provide many opportunities for scientific engagement and outreach to both the general public and in classroom settings. The intriguing nature of the excavations and ultimate findings make this expedition a perfect opportunity to bring science to the general public through print and television media. Additionally, this is an excellent opportunity to give high school students real time experience on how field science is performed. Via remote participation on the web, this project will give students the opportunity to participate in the experience of what it is like to excavate a fossil site, live out in the field, and unearth bones of gigantic, long-dead beasts, but in a safe, virtual setting.

Technical abstract
The end-Pleistocene was a time of radical change in North America. Many species of large mammals went extinct, along with the loss of a variety of associated ecosystems. Climate played a major role in this extinction event and current climate change continues to affect and alter ecosystems today. This project will re-open Natural Trap Cave in northern Wyoming to investigate paleoecological responses to climate change and how this relates to the megafaunal extinction events at the end of the Pleistocene. The permanently cold and moist conditions at NTC have preserved a large collection of megafaunal bones which still contain ancient DNA (aDNA) and collagen molecules. This rare resource is optimal to perform population-level analyses of genetic variation in the critical phases before, during, and after the end-Pleistocene extinction events. Key questions investigated in this project include: 1) Was the Pleistocene extinction event preceded by, or concurrent with a large loss of genetic diversity? 2) Are morphological changes at the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary the product of adaptation, or immigration? 3) Are major shifts in morphological and genetic variation correlated with climate change? Using aDNA, AMS radiocarbon dates, stable isotope analyses, morphological analyses, and previous data from NTC this project will investigate changes in climatic conditions and how they correlate with genetic diversity and morphological change. This research will lead to a better understanding of how climate change drives extinction and may reveal correlations between climate change, metapopulation structure and changes in genetic and morphological variation.


News Article | October 13, 2016
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

The La Brea asphalt seeps are famous for the predators entombed there. Dire wolves and the sabercat Smilodon – the site’s mascot – are the exotic Ice Age stars that everyone comes to see. The third most-numerous carnivore found there doesn’t enjoy such celebrity. In fact, there are some who consider it a beast of ill-repute. If you follow the path of the Page Museum around its circular path, there’s a little alcove near the end that presents some modern animals that lived in Ice Age times. And there, howling before an artistic depiction of itself, is that third most-abundant carnivore – the coyote. Coyotes are familiar canids. Not only are they common, but they’re so ecologically flexible that they’ve actually taken up residence with us. Compared to a dire wolf or sabercat the coyote seems familiar and plain, but it would be a mistake to overlook the beast. Coyotes are survivors of the Ice Age, and their bones record tales of evolution and extinction. Des Moines University paleontologist Julie Meachen started to draw out some of these details in a 2012 study on coyote body size. Ice Age coyotes – such as those found at La Brea – were larger than their modern counterparts, and this was often attributed to the idea that a larger body would’ve helped the carnivores better conserve body heat during the Ice Age. But Meachen and coauthor Joshua Samuels found that this wasn’t the case. By comparing coyote changes with alterations in gray wolf body size, Meachen and Samuels found that climate change couldn’t account for the shrinking coyotes. Instead, Ice Age coyotes may have been larger because size was an advantage during a time when there was a broader guild of big predators stalking the land. Once the dire wolves, sabercats, and American lions went extinct, competition for prey ceased to be so intense and coyotes became smaller. Also, many of the large prey animals of the Ice Age – such as horses and camels – went extinct, too, meaning less food on the hoof for coyote packs. Now Meachen and team of collaborators have followed up on the body-size study with an investigation of coyote mandibles from the Ice Age to the present. The researchers drew from three pools of coyote remains  – 29,000-13,000 year old Ice Age jaws; 10,000-8,000 year old Holocene jaws; and modern jaws – and created 2D models of each jaw to track how certain landmarks varied between individuals and through time. The results buttressed the conclusions of the previous study. Ice Age coyotes were generally larger and more carnivorous than their modern counterparts. The evidence is in the killing and cutting part of the jaw. The shearing portion of the Ice Age coyote tooth row was longer and underlain by a deeper, more robust portion of jaw bone, while the grinding portion of the tooth row was shorter compared to today’s modern, more omnivorous coyotes. The Holocene coyotes were intermediate in form, befitting their placement in time between the two. Along with the sheer number of specimens found at La Brea and tooth wear that indicates gnawing on bone, the new evidence adds to the emerging picture of larger, more carnivorous Ice Age coyotes that likely worked in groups to bring down large prey, as well as defend and steal carcasses. So why have coyotes shrunk with time? Meachen and colleagues suggest that the disappearance of other carnivores and the rise of gray wolves was crucial. Gray wolves were present in North America during the Ice Age, but they were relatively rare compared to dire wolves. Once dire wolves and some of the other large Ice Age carnivores went extinct, however, gray wolves were able to gain more of a foothold. This was bad news for the coyotes. Modern gray wolves often kill large coyotes, and the same was likely true in the wake of the end-Pleistocene extinction. As a result, Meachen and colleagues propose, the wolves put increased pressure on coyotes to become smaller and adapt to a lifestyle of pouncing on smaller prey. The end-Ice Age extinction was not just about loss. It also opened up new possibilities and interactions that have been affecting the survivors for the past 10,000 years. So the next time you see a coyote loping through the sagebrush or even stealing a snack from a garbage can, stop a moment to appreciate the adaptable nature of a canid that has changed with the times. Meachen, J., Janowicz, A., Avery, J., Sadleir, R. 2014. Ecological changes in coyotes (Canis latrans) in response to the Ice Age megafaunal extinctions. PLOS ONE. 9 (12): e116041. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0116041 [This post was originally published at National Geographic.]


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome David Wenger-Keller, MD, Family Medicine Physician, to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. David Wenger-Keller is a highly trained and qualified family practitioner with an extensive expertise in all facets of his work, especially fibromyalgia, asthma, and allergies. Dr. Wenger-Keller has been in practice for more than 38 years and is currently serving patients within Fort Madison Physicians and Surgeons in Fort Madison, Iowa. Dr. David Wenger-Keller attended The Medical College of Ohio at Toledo, where he graduated with his Medical Degree in 1978. He subsequently completed his Family Medicine residency within the same educational venue. Dr. Wenger-Keller is certified by the American Board of Family Medicine. To keep up to date with the latest advances and developments in his field, he maintains a professional membership with the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, and the American Academy of Family Physicians. Dr. Wenger-Keller also does emergency medicine working 6-8 shifts monthly, and is the Medical Director of the local hospice, local EMS services, and two area nursing homes. With his wealth of experience and knowledge, Dr. Wenger-Keller teaches medical students from Des Moines University in Des Moines, Iowa. He attributes his success to taking great care of people, being kind, and making a positive difference every day one person at a time. When he is not assisting patients, Dr. Wenger-Keller enjoys cooking, watching movies, and traveling. Learn more about Dr. Wenger-Keller here: http://www.fmchosp.com/ and http://www.docwk.com/ and be sure to read his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics. Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


News Article | September 8, 2016
Site: www.sciencenews.org

Remarkably preserved bones of rat-sized creatures excavated in an Indian coal mine may come from close relatives of the first primatelike animals, researchers say. A set of 25 arm, leg, ankle and foot fossils, dating to roughly 54.5 million years ago, raises India’s profile as a possible hotbed of early primate evolution, say evolutionary biologist Rachel Dunn of Des Moines University in Iowa and her colleagues. Bones from Vastan coal mine in Gujarat, India’s westernmost state, indicate that these tiny tree-dwellers resembled the first primates from as early as 65 million years ago, the scientists report in the October Journal of Human Evolution. These discoveries add to previously reported jaws, teeth and limb bones of four ancient primate species found in the same mine. “The Vastan primates probably approximate a common primate ancestor better than any fossils found previously,” says paleontologist and study coauthor Kenneth Rose of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The Vastan animals were about the size of living gray mouse lemurs and dwarf lemurs, weighing roughly 150 to 300 grams (roughly half a pound), the investigators estimate. Dunn’s group has posted 3-D scans of the fossils to Morphosource.org (SN: 3/19/16, p. 28) so other researchers can download and study the material. Most Vastan individuals possessed a basic climbing ability unlike the more specialized builds of members of the two ancient primate groups that gave rise to present-day primates, the researchers say. One of those groups, omomyids, consisted of relatives of tarsiers, monkeys and apes. The other group, adapoids, included relatives of lemurs, lorises and bushbabies. The Indian primates were tree-dwellers but could not leap from branch to branch like lemurs or ascend trees with the slow-but-sure grips of lorises, the new report concludes. Vastan primates probably descended from a common ancestor of omomyids and adapoids, the researchers propose. India was a drifting landmass headed north toward a collision with mainland Asia when the Vastan primates were alive. Isolated on a huge chunk of land, the Indian primates evolved relatively slowly, retaining a great number of ancestral skeletal traits, Rose suspects. “It’s possible that India played an important role in primate evolution,” says evolutionary anthropologist Doug Boyer of Duke University. A team led by Boyer reported in 2010 that a roughly 65-million-year-old fossil found in southern India might be a close relative of the common ancestor of primates, tree shrews and flying lemurs (which glide rather than fly and are not true lemurs). One possibility is that primates and their close relatives evolved in isolation on the island continent of India between around 65 million and 55 million years ago, Boyer suggests. Primates then spread around the world once India joined Asia by about 50 million years ago. That’s a controversial idea. An increasing number of scientists suspect primates originated in Asia. Chinese primate fossils dating to 56 million to 55 million years ago are slightly older than the Vastan primates (SN: 6/29/13, p. 14; SN: 1/3/04, p. 4). The Chinese finds show signs of having been omomyids. And in at least one respect, Boyer says, some of the new Vastan fossils may be more specialized than their discoverers claim. Vastan ankle bones, for instance, look enough like those of modern lemurs to raise doubts that the Indian primates were direct descendants of primate precursors, he holds. Dunn, however, regards the overall anatomy of the Vastan fossils as “the most direct evidence we have” that ancestors of early primates lacked lemurs’ leaping abilities, contrary to what some researchers have argued.

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