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Santa Maria Nuova, Italy

Malavolti M.,University of Modena and Reggio Emilia | Malagoli C.,University of Modena and Reggio Emilia | Fiorentini C.,University of Modena and Reggio Emilia | Longo C.,University of Modena and Reggio Emilia | And 14 more authors.
International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research | Year: 2013

Cutaneous melanoma incidence has been increasing during the last few years, and diet has been suggested as one of the lifestyle factors responsible for this increase. Since antioxidant nutrients such as ascorbic acid might prevent skin carcinogenesis, we investigated the risk of cutaneous melanoma related to vitamin C intake in a population-based case-control study in Northern Italy based on 380 melanoma patients and 719 matched controls, to whom we administered a semiquantitative foodfrequency questionnaire. After adjusting for potential confounders, odds ratio of melanoma were 0.86 (95 % confidence interval 0.65-1.15) and 0.59 (95 % confidence interval 0.37-0.94) in the intermediate and highest categories of vitamin C dietary intake respectively, compared with the bottom one. The association between vitamin C and decreased risk persisted after adjustment for some potential confounders. In age-and gender-stratified analyses, this association was seen in young females (< 60 years old), and was found to be enhanced in subjects with phototypes II and III. These results suggest a possible protective activity of vitamin C intake against cutaneous melanoma in specific subgroups of this population of Northern Italy. © 2013 Hans Huber Publishers, Hogrefe AG, Bern. Source


Vinceti M.,University of Modena and Reggio Emilia | Malagoli C.,University of Modena and Reggio Emilia | Fiorentini C.,University of Modena and Reggio Emilia | Longo C.,University of Modena and Reggio Emilia | And 15 more authors.
Nutrition and Cancer | Year: 2011

The possibility of an inverse association between vitamin D and risk of cancer and, in particular, of cutaneous malignant melanoma has been suggested, but results of epidemiologic studies are still conflicting. We examined the relation between dietary vitamin D intake and melanoma risk through a population-based case-control study (380 cases, 719 controls) in a northern region of Italy, a country with an average vitamin D intake lower than that in northern Europe or the United States. We assessed average daily intake of vitamin D from foodstuffs using the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. In this population, levels of vitamin D intake were considerably lower than those observed in recent U.S. studies. We found an inverse relation between dietary vitamin D and melanoma risk in the sample as a whole, in both crude and adjusted analyses. In sex- and age-specific analyses, this association appeared to be stronger among males and among older subjects. These findings suggest that, at the relatively low levels of intake observed in this sample, an inverse relation between dietary vitamin D and risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma may exist. Copyright © 2011, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Source

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