Denver Water

Denver, CO, United States

Denver Water

Denver, CO, United States
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News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

DENVER, May 18, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Black & Veatch has been selected to provide program management services to Denver Water on the Gross Reservoir Expansion Project. The project is a major component of the utility’s comprehensive strategy to deliver safe, reliable water service and provide resilience to its system in the face of future threats including floods, wildfires and the potential impacts of climate change. The expansion will more than double current reservoir capacity and improve water supply dependability for the 1.4 million people Denver Water serves in the metro area. As Owner’s Representative, Black & Veatch will assist Denver Water with project controls – including schedule, cost and document control, and eventually construction management – starting in May 2017 and extending through the first filling of the reservoir, expected in April 2026. Once permits are secured, dam construction is expected to occur in three phases over a total of four to five years. “Black & Veatch is supporting Denver Water’s vision of not only ensuring system resilience, but of providing clean, affordable and reliable water to customers for generations to come,” said Greg Zamensky, project manager for Black & Veatch. “The Gross Reservoir Expansion Project builds on our deep experience in supporting utilities as they execute significant, long-term projects." The project will raise the height of the existing 340-foot-dam by 131 feet, increasing reservoir capacity from 42,000 acre feet of water to 119,000 acre feet of water. The project will also increase the total output of Gross Dam’s hydroelectric power plant from 7.6 megawatts to 8.1 megawatts. “Back in the 1950s, the existing Gross Dam was designed and built to accommodate subsequent raises like the one we’re planning today,” said Jeff Martin, program manager for the Gross Reservoir Expansion Project. “Just like the current dam is a strong foundation for our future work, Black & Veatch’s resources and expertise will build on our existing project management team and will contribute significantly to delivering a successful project for Denver Water’s customers.” About Black & Veatch Black & Veatch is an employee-owned, global leader in building critical human infrastructure in Energy, Water, Telecommunications and Government Services. Since 1915, we have helped our clients improve the lives of people in over 100 countries through consulting, engineering, construction, operations and program management. Our revenues in 2016 were US$3.2 billion. Follow us on www.bv.com and in social media.


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

DENVER, May 18, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Black & Veatch has been selected to provide program management services to Denver Water on the Gross Reservoir Expansion Project. The project is a major component of the utility’s comprehensive strategy to deliver safe, reliable water service and provide resilience to its system in the face of future threats including floods, wildfires and the potential impacts of climate change. The expansion will more than double current reservoir capacity and improve water supply dependability for the 1.4 million people Denver Water serves in the metro area. As Owner’s Representative, Black & Veatch will assist Denver Water with project controls – including schedule, cost and document control, and eventually construction management – starting in May 2017 and extending through the first filling of the reservoir, expected in April 2026. Once permits are secured, dam construction is expected to occur in three phases over a total of four to five years. “Black & Veatch is supporting Denver Water’s vision of not only ensuring system resilience, but of providing clean, affordable and reliable water to customers for generations to come,” said Greg Zamensky, project manager for Black & Veatch. “The Gross Reservoir Expansion Project builds on our deep experience in supporting utilities as they execute significant, long-term projects." The project will raise the height of the existing 340-foot-dam by 131 feet, increasing reservoir capacity from 42,000 acre feet of water to 119,000 acre feet of water. The project will also increase the total output of Gross Dam’s hydroelectric power plant from 7.6 megawatts to 8.1 megawatts. “Back in the 1950s, the existing Gross Dam was designed and built to accommodate subsequent raises like the one we’re planning today,” said Jeff Martin, program manager for the Gross Reservoir Expansion Project. “Just like the current dam is a strong foundation for our future work, Black & Veatch’s resources and expertise will build on our existing project management team and will contribute significantly to delivering a successful project for Denver Water’s customers.” About Black & Veatch Black & Veatch is an employee-owned, global leader in building critical human infrastructure in Energy, Water, Telecommunications and Government Services. Since 1915, we have helped our clients improve the lives of people in over 100 countries through consulting, engineering, construction, operations and program management. Our revenues in 2016 were US$3.2 billion. Follow us on www.bv.com and in social media.


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

DENVER, May 18, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Black & Veatch has been selected to provide program management services to Denver Water on the Gross Reservoir Expansion Project. The project is a major component of the utility’s comprehensive strategy to deliver safe, reliable water service and provide resilience to its system in the face of future threats including floods, wildfires and the potential impacts of climate change. The expansion will more than double current reservoir capacity and improve water supply dependability for the 1.4 million people Denver Water serves in the metro area. As Owner’s Representative, Black & Veatch will assist Denver Water with project controls – including schedule, cost and document control, and eventually construction management – starting in May 2017 and extending through the first filling of the reservoir, expected in April 2026. Once permits are secured, dam construction is expected to occur in three phases over a total of four to five years. “Black & Veatch is supporting Denver Water’s vision of not only ensuring system resilience, but of providing clean, affordable and reliable water to customers for generations to come,” said Greg Zamensky, project manager for Black & Veatch. “The Gross Reservoir Expansion Project builds on our deep experience in supporting utilities as they execute significant, long-term projects." The project will raise the height of the existing 340-foot-dam by 131 feet, increasing reservoir capacity from 42,000 acre feet of water to 119,000 acre feet of water. The project will also increase the total output of Gross Dam’s hydroelectric power plant from 7.6 megawatts to 8.1 megawatts. “Back in the 1950s, the existing Gross Dam was designed and built to accommodate subsequent raises like the one we’re planning today,” said Jeff Martin, program manager for the Gross Reservoir Expansion Project. “Just like the current dam is a strong foundation for our future work, Black & Veatch’s resources and expertise will build on our existing project management team and will contribute significantly to delivering a successful project for Denver Water’s customers.” About Black & Veatch Black & Veatch is an employee-owned, global leader in building critical human infrastructure in Energy, Water, Telecommunications and Government Services. Since 1915, we have helped our clients improve the lives of people in over 100 countries through consulting, engineering, construction, operations and program management. Our revenues in 2016 were US$3.2 billion. Follow us on www.bv.com and in social media.


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

DENVER, May 18, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Black & Veatch has been selected to provide program management services to Denver Water on the Gross Reservoir Expansion Project. The project is a major component of the utility’s comprehensive strategy to deliver safe, reliable water service and provide resilience to its system in the face of future threats including floods, wildfires and the potential impacts of climate change. The expansion will more than double current reservoir capacity and improve water supply dependability for the 1.4 million people Denver Water serves in the metro area. As Owner’s Representative, Black & Veatch will assist Denver Water with project controls – including schedule, cost and document control, and eventually construction management – starting in May 2017 and extending through the first filling of the reservoir, expected in April 2026. Once permits are secured, dam construction is expected to occur in three phases over a total of four to five years. “Black & Veatch is supporting Denver Water’s vision of not only ensuring system resilience, but of providing clean, affordable and reliable water to customers for generations to come,” said Greg Zamensky, project manager for Black & Veatch. “The Gross Reservoir Expansion Project builds on our deep experience in supporting utilities as they execute significant, long-term projects." The project will raise the height of the existing 340-foot-dam by 131 feet, increasing reservoir capacity from 42,000 acre feet of water to 119,000 acre feet of water. The project will also increase the total output of Gross Dam’s hydroelectric power plant from 7.6 megawatts to 8.1 megawatts. “Back in the 1950s, the existing Gross Dam was designed and built to accommodate subsequent raises like the one we’re planning today,” said Jeff Martin, program manager for the Gross Reservoir Expansion Project. “Just like the current dam is a strong foundation for our future work, Black & Veatch’s resources and expertise will build on our existing project management team and will contribute significantly to delivering a successful project for Denver Water’s customers.” About Black & Veatch Black & Veatch is an employee-owned, global leader in building critical human infrastructure in Energy, Water, Telecommunications and Government Services. Since 1915, we have helped our clients improve the lives of people in over 100 countries through consulting, engineering, construction, operations and program management. Our revenues in 2016 were US$3.2 billion. Follow us on www.bv.com and in social media.


Friend E.R.,RJH Consultants | Weldon J.H.,Denver Water | Olsen J.A.,RJH Consultants
Environmental and Engineering Geoscience | Year: 2010

Miller Reservoir and Dam is a 43-ft-high (13-m-high), 5,000-ft-long (1,524-m-long) dam located along the South Platte River north of Denver, CO. The reservoir is located at the site of a previous gravel mine. The capacity of the original gravel pit reservoir was about 800 acre-feet (986,800 m 3). By constructing a perimeter embankment and soil-bentonite cutoff wall and mining material within the limits of the reservoir, the storage was increased to over 2,000 acre-feet (2,467,000 m 3). This additional storage is an integral part of the water management system of Denver Water, which services 1.3 million customers and is Colorado's oldest and largest water supplier. Because of site constraints and property boundary limitations, the seepage barrier for the dam foundation included the combination of about 6,600 ft (2,012 m) of soil-bentonite cutoff wall with about 1,400 ft (427 m) of core trench extending into bedrock. The embankment consisted of three different typical dam sections that made use of available onsite materials for construction. Four distinct methods to connect the clay core of the embankment with the different seepage-control measures were designed and incorporated into the project. Vertical connections between the clay core, soil-bentonite cutoff wall, and bedrock were also designed and installed adjacent to the outlet works tower. This paper will present the different types of seepage control, incorporation of the embankment internal zoning with the seepage-control methods, and material utilization for dams with multiple seepage barriers.


Bambei Jr. J.H.,Denver Water | Keil B.,Northwest Pipe Company
Pipelines 2013: Pipelines and Trenchless Construction and Renewals - A Global Perspective - Proceedings of the Pipelines 2013 Conference | Year: 2013

AWWA C200 Steel Water Pipe, 6 Inch and Larger, is an industry consensus standard that is recognized throughout the world and is the preeminent guide for the manufacture of steel pipe for water and wastewater applications in North America. The first AWWA steel water pipe standard (7A.3 and 7A.4) were published in 1940. In 1949, 7A.3 was replaced with C201 and 7A.4 was replaced with C202. These two standards were later combined into the C200 standard in 1975. Since then, the document has undergone six revisions, each iteration marked by improvements to the manufacturing process as well as associated quality control procedures. The most recent revision, incorporating a number of significant updates, was approved by the AWWA Board of Directors on June 22, 2012 and became effective on September 1, 2012. This paper will provide a historical perspective of AWWA steel water pipe standards, followed by a discussion of some substantial improvements made in the latest revision of C200. Topics discussed will include considerations for the Charpy toughness or impact testing, new testing requirements for gasket materials, allowable steel grades and or characteristics, manufacturing test requirements, weld procedures and weld testing. © 2013 American Society of Civil Engineers.


Good B.,Denver Water
AWWA Sustainable Water Management Conference and Exposition 2010 | Year: 2010

• Not all water can be reused in Colorado • The last 10 years have introduced many new challenges • Denver Water is expanding its thinking and pace of reuse • Milk stools hold the key!. © 2010 American Water Works Association.


Turney M.S.,Denver Water
Pipelines 2010: Climbing New Peaks to Infrastructure Reliability - Renew, Rehab, and Reinvest - Proc. of the Pipelines 2010 Conference | Year: 2010

In 2008 Denver Water deployed the Sahara® (The Pressure Pipe Inspection Company) and SmartBall (Pure Technologies) leak detection systems into an 11.7 mile, 60 and 66-inch diameter potable water transmission main. Leaks unknown to the contractors were simulated by the owner during the testing. This paper compares the preparation required, implementation, and inspection results for each system as experienced by Denver Water. © 2010 ASCE.


Depperschmidt A.,Denver Water
Journal / American Water Works Association | Year: 2010

Denver Water's 'Use Only What You Need' campaign earns the utility a national award for humor and effectiveness. Hired talents drove the message around Denver in an old taxi that had been parted out and left with only what it needed to run. There were even towers of bright orange 50-gal drums stacked on top of each other throughout the city, helping people visualize the amount of water wasted from leaky toilets or broken sprinkler heads. The agency also encouraged people to take 2 minutes off their lawn-watering times with its 'Grass is Dumb' message. The campaign, displayed on billboards, TV commercials, bus tails, and other locations, told customers that 'Grass is Dumb. Water 2 minutes less. Your lawn won't notice.' Cutting 2 minutes is a small enough amount that lawns will stay healthy and green; if everyone did it. Denver Water plans to stick with its nontraditional advertising tactics to continue this water conservation momentum.


News Article | December 17, 2015
Site: news.yahoo.com

DENVER (AP) — Colorado's top environmental official is stepping down, months after he clashed with federal authorities over a massive spill of toxic wastewater from an inactive mine in southwest Colorado. Mike King's resignation was announced Thursday and takes effect Dec. 31. The executive director of the Colorado Department of Natural Resources had led the agency since 2010. His departure comes on the heels of the resignation of Hickenlooper's lieutenant governor and appears part of the regular string of exits of veteran officials as the administration moves into its final years. King clashed with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency earlier this year over the Aug. 5 Gold King Mine disaster. The spill polluted rivers in Colorado, New Mexico and Utah, including on the Southern Ute Reservation and the Navajo Nation. The EPA came under intense criticism from Congress and from state and local officials for causing the blowout and for the way it responded. The EPA said after the spill that that Colorado officials endorsed its cleanup operation at the mine and that state experts were at the Gold King Mine on the day of the spill in a supporting role for the cleanup operation. But in a September letter to the EPA, King raised nine objections to the EPA's account. He said that Colorado officials neither approved nor disapproved of the operation. King's letter was a blow to the EPA's contention that outside technical experts supported its plan to push a drainage pipe through debris covering the entrance to the Gold King Mine. The letter also raised questions about an investigation of the spill by the federal Bureau of Reclamation, which said two mining experts from the state approved of the project "The investigation's conclusions into the events surrounding the discharge were not consistent with our staff's involvement and we felt it important to make sure the investigators were aware of our perspective," King said in a statement about his letter. The director did not immediately respond to a request from The Associated Press for additional comment Thursday. A statement from Gov. John Hickenlooper on Thursday said that King plans to take a new job as director of planning with Denver Water. Hickenlooper praised King as "wicked smart" with a " casual charm," and credited King for overseeing Colorado's first statewide water plan, which came out earlier this year. The governor gave no timeline for replacing King. The governor has another notable vacancy to fill in his cabinet, Lt. Gov. Joe Garcia. Garcia announced last month that he is resigning to run the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education.

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