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News Article | December 12, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Drs. Allen Huang and Jeffrey Wang are pleased to announce that they recently attended a continuing education course focused on new techniques for implant dentistry titled, "The Changing World of Implant Dentistry: The Latest Patient Specific Overdenture Solutions." Drs. Huang, Wang, and the entire Significance Dental Implant Specialists team, are happy to provide patients with the experience, knowledge and skills they require for this important procedure. Patients in need of a skilled periodontist in Las Vegas, NV, to replace their missing teeth and restore oral function, are able to receive cutting-edge dental implant care at Significance Dental Specialists. The field of dentistry is always evolving to improve patient care as new research and technology is developed. During this course held by Dentsply Implants, Drs. Huang and Wang learned the latest, patient-focused techniques by utilizing state-of-the-art technology in implant placement and overdenture solutions. A large focus of the course covered advanced overdenture solutions including All-on-4® dental implants. The Significance Dental Specialists team strive to take numerous continuing education courses to stay up-to-date on new advancements in dentistry and integrate innovative technology into every procedure including the All-on-4® dental implant tooth replacement solution. This treatment option is increasingly popular for patients with multiple missing teeth because of its comfortable, convenient and aesthetically appealing nature. The All-on-4® treatment concept offers immediate function and the stability of dental implants by using four strategically placed implants as the foundation of a customized bridge of new teeth. Patients with some degree of bone loss are also able to receive this technique without a bone graft. Other instructional elements of this course enhanced dental implant treatment planning, overdenture fabrication, attachment system options for the overdenture, and detailed instructions for the entire clinical team to improve patient care. Drs. Huang and Wang are pleased to offer some of the most preferred and effective overdenture solutions, including All-on-4®. Patients who want to receive treatment for their missing teeth from a skilled, knowledgeable and dependable periodontist in Las Vegas, NV, can contact Significance Dental Specialists for more information. To schedule an appointment, call 844-801-3177. Dr. Allen Huang is a Board Certified Periodontist and Implant Specialist, offering personalized dental care for patients in Las Vegas, NV. Dr. Huang received his degree in Bio-Chemical Engineering from the University of California at Los Angeles. He went on to earn his DMD degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine. Following his general dental training, Dr. Huang received a full 3-year scholarship to train in Periodontics and Implant Dentistry at University of Illinois at Chicago. During his training, Dr. Huang received many academic honors, and was named as the first Chief-Resident in program history. In addition to his specialty training, Dr. Huang also obtained a Master of Science (MS) degree in oral biology from the University of Illinois where he conducted clinical and histological research in bone regeneration in furcation defects in baboons. Dr. Huang was also involved in clinical and histological study of platelet rich plasma (PRP) in sinus lift bone regeneration project. Dr. Huang is a Diplomate of the American Academy of Periodontology and a member of the America Academy of Periodontology, American Academy of Osseointegration, Academy of Dental Association and Southern Nevada Dental Society. In addition, Dr. Huang recently started his own dental implant company and is the CEO of Altosbiotech, LLC. Dr. Jeffrey Wang is a Board Certified Periodontist and Implant Specialist, and is committed to the maintenance, restoration health and aesthetics of the mouth. Dr. Wang attended the University of Michigan for his undergraduate education. He completed his dental training in the University of Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine. He went on to pursue his post-doctoral training and certification in periodontics and implantology in the University of California, San Francisco, where he also received his master’s degree. To learn more about the services Dr. Huang and Dr. Wang provide please visit their website at http://www.sdsdental.com or call (844) 801-3177.


Halldin A.,Malmö University | Ander M.,Chalmers University of Technology | Jacobsson M.,Malmö University | Hansson S.,DENTSPLY Implants
BioMedical Engineering Online | Year: 2015

Background: When an implant is inserted in the bone the healing process starts to osseointegrate the implant by creating new bone that interlocks with the implant. Biomechanical interlocking capacity is commonly evaluated in in vivo experiments. It would be beneficial to find a numerical method to evaluate the interlocking capacity of different surface structures with bone. In the present study, the theoretical interlocking capacity of three different surfaces after different healing times was evaluated by the means of explicit finite element analysis. Methods: The surface topographies of the three surfaces were measured with interferometry and were used to construct a 3D bone-implant model. The implant was subjected to a displacement until failure of the bone-to-implant interface and the maximum force represents the interlocking capacity. Results: The simulated ratios (test/control) seem to agree with the in vivo ratios of Halldin et al. for longer healing times. However the absolute removal torque values are underestimated and do not reach the biomechanical performance found in the study by Halldin et al. which might be a result of unknown mechanical properties of the interface. Conclusion: Finite element analysis is a promising method that might be used prior to an in vivo study to compare the load bearing capacity of the bone-to-implant interface of two surface topographies at longer healing times. © 2015 Halldin et al.


Loberg J.,Gothenburg University | Gretzer C.,Dentsply Implants | Mattisson I.,Dentsply Implants | Ahlberg E.,Gothenburg University
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part B Applied Biomaterials | Year: 2014

For dental implants, improved osseointegration is obtained by modifying the surface roughness as well as oxide morphology and composition. A combination of different effects contributes to enhanced performance, but with surface roughness as the dominant factor. To single out the effect of oxide conductivity on biological response, oxide films with similar thickness and surface roughness but different electronic properties were formed using galvanostatic anodization. Three different current densities were used, 2.4, 4.8, and 11.9 mA cm-2, which resulted in growth rates ranging from 0.2 to 2.5 V s-1. The electronic properties were evaluated using cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy, while the biological response was studied by cell activity and apatite formation. The number of charge carrier in the oxide film close to the oxide/solution interface decreased from 5.8 × 10-19 to 3.2 × 10-19 cm-2 with increasing growth rate, that is, the conductivity decreased correspondingly. Cell response of the different surfaces was tested in vitro using human osteoblast-like cells (MG-63). The results clearly show decreased osteoblast proliferation and adhesion but higher mineralization activity for the oxide with lower conductivity at the oxide/solution interface. The apatite-forming ability was examined by immersion in simulated body fluid. At short times the apatite coverage was ∼26% for the anodized surfaces, significantly larger than for the reference with only 3% coverage. After 1 week of immersion the apatite coverage ranged from 73 to 56% and a slight differentiation between the anodized surfaces was obtained with less apatite formation on the surface with lower conductivity, in line with the cell culture results. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Loberg J.,Dentsply Implants | Mattisson I.,Dentsply Implants | Ahlberg E.,Gothenburg University
Applied Surface Science | Year: 2014

In an attempt to reduce the need for animal studies in dental implant applications, a new model has been developed which combines well-known surface characterization methods with theoretical biomechanical calculations. The model has been named integrated biomechanical and topographical surface characterization (IBTSC), and gives a comprehensive description of the surface topography and the ability of the surface to induce retention strength with bone. IBTSC comprises determination of 3D-surface roughness parameters by using 3D-scanning electron microscopy (3D-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and calculation of the ability of different surface topographies to induce retention strength in bone by using the local model. Inherent in this integrated approach is the use of a length scale analysis, which makes it possible to separate different size levels of surface features. The IBTSC concept is tested on surfaces with different level of hierarchy, induced by mechanical as well as chemical treatment. Sequential treatment with oxalic and hydrofluoric acid results in precipitated nano-sized features that increase the surface roughness and the surface slope on the sub-micro and nano levels. This surface shows the highest calculated shear strength using the local model. The validity, robustness and applicability of the IBTSC concept are demonstrated and discussed. © 2013 The Authors.


Mattisson I.,Dentsply Implants | Gretzer C.,Dentsply Implants | Ahlberg E.,Gothenburg University
Materials Research Bulletin | Year: 2013

Newly designed implant surfaces with hierarchic structure have been characterized with respect to chemical composition, topography, electrical properties and cell culturing. Three levels of surface roughness are induced starting from a blasted surface with the naturally formed oxide layer. Dissolution of the blasted surface is obtained by chemical treatment in oxalic acid. The surface becomes smoother with multitude of shallow depressions in the walls and bottoms of the blasted structure. The surface oxide layer formed is somewhat thicker than the naturally formed oxide and may contain oxalate. In the final step, part of the oxide layer is dissolved in hydrofluoric acid leading to a high concentration of soluble titanium species. A nanostructured surface is formed by precipitation of titanium oxide at spots on the surface where locally the pH is increased due to hydrogen evolution. The surface roughness is only marginally changed by the chemical treatment while the conductivity of the surface layer is lower for the chemically treated surfaces compared with the blasted reference. The hierarchical structure mimics many natural processes for achieving high shear strength. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Friedrich - Alexander - University, Erlangen - Nuremberg, Charité - Medical University of Berlin and DENTSPLY Implants
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Clinical oral implants research | Year: 2015

The overall aim of the study was to investigate a biofunctionalized implant surface with electrochemically deposition of hydroxyapatite and the synthetic peptide (P-15) and its effect on osseointegration.Three modified implant types of ANKYLOSAll implant surfaces showed a high level of osseointegration and osteoconductivity. The cumulative implant survival rate (CSR) was 93.8%, 100% in the M, 85% in the P, and 95% in the BP group. No statistical difference in BICs at ROI 1/4, 2/3, and 5 could be shown between implant types following 2 and 7days of healing. BIC values increased in all groups over time. After 6months of healing the BP group showed superiority in BIC in ROI 2/3 (73.215.6%) compared to the P (48.310.6%) and M group (66.330.2%) with a significant difference between BP and P (P=0.002).It is hypothesized, that the surface biofunctionalization improves peri-implant bone formation and remodeling, leading to an increased bone-to implant contact. However, within the limitations of the study set-up no benefit in the early phase of osseointegration could be established for dental implants with P-15 containing surface in this study.


PubMed | Praxis fur Mund, DENTSPLY Implants, Gemeinschaftspraxis fur Mund Kiefer Gesichtschirurgie & Zahnheilkunde and Dentale Zahnarztliches Kompetenzzentrum GmbH
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of implant dentistry | Year: 2016

A sufficient amount of bone is essential to ensure long-term stability of dental implants. To support the bone regeneration process, different techniques and materials are available. It has been questioned whether these techniques and materials may compromise implant survival compared to pristine bone. To properly answer this question, long-term stability up to 20.2years after insertion of implants placed in augmented or non-augmented sites was retrospectively analysed.Retrospective analysis included 10,158 implants from 3095 patients in three private practices who underwent implant therapy with or without bone augmentation procedures. Different graft materials and membranes were used for augmentation. If necessary, the graft was stabilised using a titanium mesh. Implant survival was evaluated analysing explantation rates and Kaplan-Meier survival curves in augmented or non-augmented sites. In additional subgroup analyses, augmentation procedures, graft materials and membranes were compared applying descriptive statistics.The observation period varied from the day of implantation up to 20.2years after implant insertion. The overall implant survival was 95.5% (augmented sites 96.33%; native sites 94.27%). Comparison of Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed significantly better survival of implants in augmented sites (p=0.0025). When comparing different augmentation procedures, the best results were found for bone condensing followed by lateral augmentation. Graft materials were used in 58.2%, membranes in 36.6% of all implant sites. The most often used graft materials were a deproteinized bovine bone mineral (53.0%) and autogenous bone particles (32.5%). Both provided the best results and showed a significantly better implant survival compared to no graft material using the Kaplan-Meier method (p=0.0104 and p<0.0001). A native collagen membrane was used most often (74.0% of the membrane sites) and provided the best results regarding implant survival in the log-rank test.The retrospective analysis shows that implants inserted in augmented or native bone demonstrate similar implant survival under the conditions of private practice compared to prospective studies. To establish a broad base of support, further well-designed clinical trials are necessary.


PubMed | DENTSPLY Implants, Malmö University and Chalmers University of Technology
Type: | Journal: Biomedical engineering online | Year: 2015

When an implant is inserted in the bone the healing process starts to osseointegrate the implant by creating new bone that interlocks with the implant. Biomechanical interlocking capacity is commonly evaluated in in vivo experiments. It would be beneficial to find a numerical method to evaluate the interlocking capacity of different surface structures with bone. In the present study, the theoretical interlocking capacity of three different surfaces after different healing times was evaluated by the means of explicit finite element analysis.The surface topographies of the three surfaces were measured with interferometry and were used to construct a 3D bone-implant model. The implant was subjected to a displacement until failure of the bone-to-implant interface and the maximum force represents the interlocking capacity.The simulated ratios (test/control) seem to agree with the in vivo ratios of Halldin et al. for longer healing times. However the absolute removal torque values are underestimated and do not reach the biomechanical performance found in the study by Halldin et al. which might be a result of unknown mechanical properties of the interface.Finite element analysis is a promising method that might be used prior to an in vivo study to compare the load bearing capacity of the bone-to-implant interface of two surface topographies at longer healing times.

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