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Yeow C.H.,National University of Singapore | Lee P.V.S.,National University of Singapore | Lee P.V.S.,Defence and Medical Environmental Research Institute | Goh J.C.H.,National University of Singapore
Knee | Year: 2010

Single-leg and double-leg landing techniques are common athletic maneuvers typically performed from various landing heights during intensive sports activities. However, it is still unclear how the knee joint responds in terms of kinematics and energetics to the combined effects of different landing heights and techniques. We hypothesized that the knee displays greater flexion angles and angular velocities, joint power and work in response to the larger peak ground reaction force from 0.6-m height, compared to 0.3-m height. We further hypothesized that the knee exhibits elevated flexion angles and angular velocities, joint power and work during double-leg landing, relative to single-leg landing. Ground reaction force, knee joint kinematics and energetics data were obtained from 10 subjects performing single-leg and double-leg landing from 0.3-m to 0.6-m heights, using motion-capture system and force-plates. Higher peak ground reaction force (p < 0.05) was observed during single-leg landing and/or at greater landing height. We found greater knee flexion angles and angular velocities (p < 0.05) during double-leg landing and/or at greater landing height. Elevated knee joint power and work were noted (p < 0.05) during double-leg landing and/or at greater landing height. The knee joint is able to respond more effectively in terms of kinematics and energetics to a larger landing impact from an elevated height during double-leg landing, compared to single-leg landing. This allows better shock absorption and thus minimizes the risk of sustaining lower extremity injuries. © 2009 Elsevier B.V.

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