Deep Breeze Ltd

Or Akiva, Israel

Deep Breeze Ltd

Or Akiva, Israel

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Detterbeck F.,Yale University | Gat M.,Deep Breeze Ltd | Miller D.,Emory University | Force S.,Emory University | And 3 more authors.
Annals of Thoracic Surgery | Year: 2013

Background: Currently, predicted postoperative (PPO) lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [PPO-FEV1] and diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide [PPO-Dlco]) estimated from spirometry and regional perfusion is used to select patients for lung resection. Vibration response imaging (VRI) analyzes lung sounds and quantifies regional acoustic energy. Single-center studies suggest that this noninvasive, radiation-free method of quantifying lung function is comparable to the reference standard. Methods: A prospective, multiinstitutional United States study comparing VRI with perfusion in patient assessment for lung resection enrolled 163 patients, with 135 currently available for analysis. PPO values were calculated by subtracting the fraction of segments to be resected in a lung (113 lobectomies, 20 pneumonectomies) multiplied by the percentage of acoustic energy (VRI) or perfusion of that lung. We compared the two methods with each other, with actual postoperative pulmonary function tests, and the rate of complications as predicted by PPO values above or below 40%. Results: Good agreement was found between calculated estimations of postoperative lung function using VRI and perfusion measurements (PPO-FEV1%: r = 0.95; -8% to 11.5%; PPO-Dlco: r = 0.97; -6.6% to 9.5%), although larger discrepancies were noted between the actual VRI and perfusion measurements (-17 to 24). The VRI and perfusion methods provided excellent agreement in categorization of patients into low or elevated risk based on PPO values of above or below 40% (95% for PPO-FEV1%; 94% for PPO-Dlco) and similar correlations with actual postoperative values (r = 0.74 and r = 0.67 for FEV1; r = 0.72 and r = 0.67 for Dlco). Conclusions: VRI may offer a simple, noninvasive, and radiation-free alternative to lung scintigraphy for predicting postoperative lung function in patients with lung malignancies. © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons.


Lev S.,Rabin Medical Center | Glickman Y.A.,Deep Breeze Ltd. | Kagan I.,Rabin Medical Center | Shapiro M.,Rabin Medical Center | And 5 more authors.
Respiration | Year: 2010

Background: Complementary bedside lung monitoring modalities are often sought in order to assist in the differentiation between several lung opacities in the intensive care unit (ICU). Objectives: To evaluate the use of computerized lung acoustic monitoring as a complementary approach in the differentiation between various chest radiographic densities in critically ill patients. Methods: Lung vibration intensity was assessed in 82 intensive care patients using vibration response imaging. Patients were classified according to their primary findings on chest radiography (CXR): consolidation (n = 35), congestion (n = 10), pleural effusion (n = 15), atelectasis/hypoinflation (n = 10) and normal findings (n = 12). Sixty patients were mechanically ventilated and 22 patients were spontaneously breathing. Results: Significantly elevated vibration intensity was detected in patients with consolidation, as opposed to pleural effusion, atelectasis and normal CXR (p < 0.01, Mann-Whitney U test). Vibration intensity was also increased for congestion, but this increase was not significant. The positive predictive value of CXR lung opacity in combination with increased vibration intensity to detect consolidations and/or congestions was 95% (20/21). Furthermore, vibration intensity was significantly higher in mechanically ventilated patients compared to spontaneously breathing patients (p = 0.001, Mann-Whitney U test). Differences related to gender, age and body position were not significant. Conclusions: Computerized lung acoustic monitoring at the bedside was found to be a useful, readily available, noninvasive, adjunctive tool in the differentiation between various CXR densities in critically ill patients. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.


Radzievsky N.,Deep Breeze Ltd. | Papyan S.,Deep Breeze Ltd. | Kushnir I.,Deep Breeze Ltd. | Gat M.,Deep Breeze Ltd. | And 3 more authors.
European Journal of Clinical Investigation | Year: 2012

Background We examined the feasibility of estimating left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by a novel acoustic-based device [vibration response imaging (VRI); Deep Breeze]. Methods One hundred and forty-one subjects (117 patients and 24 healthy volunteers; age 55±15years, 82% men) were examined by both VRI and echocardiography. LVEF was determined by echocardiography (echo-LVEF) using the biplane Simpson's method. Low-frequency acoustic signals (10-70Hz) were recorded by VRI from the left posterior thorax by a matrix of 36 microphones during 8s of breath holding, and an electrocardiogram was recorded simultaneously. The acoustic signals were processed digitally, and an algorithm designed to estimate LVEF was developed (VRI-LVEF), based on a combination of multiple acoustic (systolic and diastolic acoustic signals, beat-to-beat variability of acoustic signals and propagation of acoustic signals throughout the matrix), electrocardiographic and clinical parameters. Results Mean echo-LVEF was 51±15% (range, 11-76%). Echo-LVEF was reduced (<50%) in 55 subjects (39%) and severely reduced (<35%) in 28 subjects (20%). VRI-LVEF calculated by a multivariate algorithm correlated significantly with echo-LVEF (R 2= 0·59; P<0·001). VRI-LVEF accurately predicted the presence of reduced (<50%) or severely reduced (<35%) echo-LVEF, with sensitivities of 84% and 82%, specificities of 86% and 91%, positive predictive values of 79% and 70% and negative predictive values of 89% and 95%, respectively. Conclusions LVEF can be estimated using a novel acoustic-based device. This device may assist in triage of patients according to LVEF prior to definitive assessment of LVEF by echocardiography. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2011 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.


Sharif D.,Bnai Zion Medical Center | Radzievsky N.,Deep Breeze Co. | Samniah N.,Bnai Zion Medical Center | Hassan A.,Bnai Zion Medical Center | And 2 more authors.
PACE - Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology | Year: 2011

Background: QRS width and echocardiography-derived indices are limited predictors of response to resynchronization therapy. We applied digital palpography, using vibration resonance imaging, to investigate the effects of right ventricular pacing and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) on mechanical and electrical dyssynchrony. Methods: Forty-nine subjects were examined: 24 normal controls, 18 subjects with right ventricular apical pacing (12 with reduced LVEF), and seven subjects with reduced LVEF and narrow QRS. Digital measurement of QRS width was performed. Electric dyssynchrony index (EDI) was measured as the time interval between peak R-waves of the same QRS complex of simultaneously recorded standard limb electrocardiograms, L1 and L2. A matrix of 6 × 6 vibration recording transducers was applied to chest. The interval between the onset of Q-wave and the peak of amplitude vibration for each transducer was measured, and a three-dimensional map for the whole matrix of transducers was generated. Median values (QE1) were measured. Mechanical vibration systolic dyssynchrony index (VSDI) for each subject was determined as the standard deviation of the difference between the median value and each transducer interval. Results: EDI was larger in subjects with right ventricular pacing. Mechanical dyssynchrony indices were larger with pacing and reduced LVEF. EDI correlated with QRS width (r 2 = 0.7), with VSDI (r 2 = 0.42), and with QE1 (r 2 = 0.74). QRS width correlated with QE1 (r 2 = 0.75). Conclusions: Digital chest palpography can determine dyssynchrony indices that are larger in subjects with right ventricular pacing and reduced LVEF and correlate with parameters of electrical dyssynchrony. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


A system comprising a viscoelastic interface sheet to engage a sound vibrations sensors array to a sound generating objects. The structure of the interface sheet includes elements for easy handling, positioning and mounting. A device for storage and mounting support of such interface sheets is disclosed.


Patent
Deep Breeze Ltd. | Date: 2010-06-22

The present invention discloses a novel positioning unit configured in accordance with a recording matrix for ensuring correct and ergonomic positioning of a patient with respect to the recording matrix utilizing body landmarks such as spine and scapula. The technique of the present invention provides for supporting at least a region of the patient body in a desired position (e.g. on a patient bed) and positioning the regions of the patient body relative to the patient bed. The positioning unit allows repeated, precise supporting and positioning of a patient in a desired position with the patient being comfortably supported or fixed in this position, during the monitoring and diagnostic procedure, i.e. when the recording matrix is applied to the patient.


Patent
Deep Breeze Ltd. | Date: 2012-05-16

A device for sensing lung sounds, comprising: a piezoelectric sensor comprising an electrical conductive plate attached to a piezoelectric material, said sensor encased in a body structure; a first electric wire connected to the piezoelectric material on the opposite side of said plate; a second electric wire connected to said plate; a connector connected to the other ends of said first and second electric wires; and an adhesive layer connected to the surface of said plate on the side opposite to the piezoelectric material, said adhesive layer facing away from said plate; said device adapted to provide electrical signals representing vibrations present on the surface of a object when it is attached to said object surface with said adhesive layer; said electrical signals resulting from vibrations on the object surface, wherein stress applied on the piezoelectric material generates electrical voltage-difference on both sides of the piezoelectric material, creating voltage build-up on said first and second electric wires.


PubMed | Deep Breeze Ltd
Type: Journal Article | Journal: European journal of clinical investigation | Year: 2012

We examined the feasibility of estimating left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by a novel acoustic-based device [vibration response imaging (VRI); Deep Breeze].One hundred and forty-one subjects (117 patients and 24 healthy volunteers; age 55 15 years, 82% men) were examined by both VRI and echocardiography. LVEF was determined by echocardiography (echo-LVEF) using the biplane Simpsons method. Low-frequency acoustic signals (10-70 Hz) were recorded by VRI from the left posterior thorax by a matrix of 36 microphones during 8 s of breath holding, and an electrocardiogram was recorded simultaneously. The acoustic signals were processed digitally, and an algorithm designed to estimate LVEF was developed (VRI-LVEF), based on a combination of multiple acoustic (systolic and diastolic acoustic signals, beat-to-beat variability of acoustic signals and propagation of acoustic signals throughout the matrix), electrocardiographic and clinical parameters.Mean echo-LVEF was 51 15% (range, 11-76%). Echo-LVEF was reduced (< 50%) in 55 subjects (39%) and severely reduced (< 35%) in 28 subjects (20%). VRI-LVEF calculated by a multivariate algorithm correlated significantly with echo-LVEF (R(2) = 059; P < 0001). VRI-LVEF accurately predicted the presence of reduced (< 50%) or severely reduced (< 35%) echo-LVEF, with sensitivities of 84% and 82%, specificities of 86% and 91%, positive predictive values of 79% and 70% and negative predictive values of 89% and 95%, respectively.LVEF can be estimated using a novel acoustic-based device. This device may assist in triage of patients according to LVEF prior to definitive assessment of LVEF by echocardiography.


Trademark
DeepBreeze Ltd. | Date: 2011-02-16

Medical imaging and analysis apparatus, for screening, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and follow-up of clinical conditions of the lungs and of the respiratory system, which include telecommunication components to permit use in telemedicine services delivered via telecommunication networks and global computer networks. Telemedicine services via telecommunication networks and global computer networks; medical screening services, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and follow-up of clinical conditions relating to the lungs and respiratory system; rental and leasing of medical devices.

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