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News Article | November 28, 2016
Site: www.techrepublic.com

The bigger your business grows, the more you will rely upon Network Attached Storage (NAS). There are many solutions for such a service, but few are as easy to get up and running and will serve you as well as openmediavault. Openmediavault is a next-gen NAS solution based on Debian Linux that contains the services you need, including SSH, (S)FTP, SMB/CIFS, DAAP media server, RSync, BitTorrent client, and many more. Openmediavault is designed to perfectly suit home and small businesses, but thanks to numerous plugins, it can easily support medium-size businesses, too. Learn how you can start enjoying your new NAS solution. You can either install openmediavault on a stand-alone server or as a virtual machine (VM). No matter which route you choose, you'll need to download the ISO image and burn it to disk, insert it into your server, boot up and install, or use the ISO image to create a new VM. I'll use VirtualBox to create a VM of openmediavault, so I'll go through the standard procedure for creating a new VM using the openmediavault ISO image. Regardless of which path you take, the installation process is very simple. It is, however, an ncurses-based installation (there is no fancy GUI). You'll be presented with a number of ncurses screens (Figure A), none of which are a significant challenge. The steps you'll walk through are: That's all there is to the installation. It shouldn't take more than 20 minutes to have your openmediavault server up and running, although this will depend upon your network connection speed. Once the installation completes, you need to reboot the system. When the reboot completes, log into the server as the user root and the password you created during installation—this will land you on a bash prompt. Issue the command ifconfig to find out your server's IP address and then head over to another machine on your LAN and point a browser to that address. Log into the openmedivault web interface. You cannot use the root credentials you created during installation; instead, log in with the username admin and the password openmediavault and immediately follow these steps. You can set up openmediavault to do exactly what you need—create users, add shares, set up services, install plugins...you name it. I highly recommend you start by going to System | Update Management and applying all available updates. Once your system is updated, go to Services and set up only those services you know you'll need such as SMB/CIFS (which is disabled by default). When you need to expand your server, you can add services and plugins. Openmediavault will serve you very well as a NAS solution. Spin this up, and see if it becomes your go-to NAS server.


Moller S.,University of Lübeck | Krabbenhoft H.N.,Debian Linux | Tille A.,Debian Linux | Paleino D.,Debian Linux | And 9 more authors.
BMC Bioinformatics | Year: 2010

Background: The Open Source movement and its technologies are popular in the bioinformatics community because they provide freely available tools and resources for research. In order to feed the steady demand for updates on software and associated data, a service infrastructure is required for sharing and providing these tools to heterogeneous computing environments.Results: The Debian Med initiative provides ready and coherent software packages for medical informatics and bioinformatics. These packages can be used together in Taverna workflows via the UseCase plugin to manage execution on local or remote machines. If such packages are available in cloud computing environments, the underlying hardware and the analysis pipelines can be shared along with the software.Conclusions: Debian Med closes the gap between developers and users. It provides a simple method for offering new releases of software and data resources, thus provisioning a local infrastructure for computational biology. For geographically distributed teams it can ensure they are working on the same versions of tools, in the same conditions. This contributes to the world-wide networking of researchers. © 2010 Möller et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.techrepublic.com

Sphirewall is a unique firewall distribution based on Debian Linux that offers more than just standard security; out of the box, you get advanced information for your network and traffic usage as well as the ability to glance at network traffic according to user, address, device, and much more. Unlike most Linux-based firewalls, Sphirewall doesn't use iptables — it uses a kernel module that hooks into the packet stream and passes the packets to the Sphirewall core, which tracks and manages the packets based on user-configurable rules and events. It's incredibly easy to get Sphirewall up and running for a small business. Before I start the walk-through, please note: It is possible to install it on an already running Debian-based machine, but I highly recommend installing the Sphirewall as a dedicated machine, thus installing the entire platform. Download the ISO image from the Sphirewall Download page. Once you have that file, burn the image to disk. With that disk burned, place it into the server to be used and boot up. When the splash screen opens (), you can choose between Install or Graphical Install. Both are very simple, but if you're not accustomed to the ncurses interface, select the Graphical Install option. I'll walk you through the information each screen requires. Let the system boot. When the boot process completes, log in with the following: Once you're logged in, issue the command ifconfig to find out the machine's ipaddress. Armed with that address, you can log in to the web-based administration console by opening a web browser on the same network and pointing it to http://IP_ADDRESS_OF_SERVER (IP_ADDRESS_OF_SERVER is the server's address). At the login prompt, log in with these credentials: Once you're in the web-based management console, you need to complete these tasks: By default, Sphirewall uses DHCP to get its IP address; this has to be changed to a static setup. To do this, follow these steps. You will want to set up your firewall according to your company/network/user needs. But in order to make those configurations, you at least need to know where to look. Here's what to do. After you configure all of your rules, you can go back and set up BlockLists and Aliases to help further secure your network. Once Sphirewall is set up, head over to the Dashboard and the Reporting section to start monitoring how your network traffic is shaping up. Sphirewall is a powerful tool that can enable you to enjoy a much more secure network for a fraction of the cost of proprietary solutions (if you already have the hardware, the cost is zero). Give this security solution a try, and see if it meets your needs.

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