Melbourne, Australia
Melbourne, Australia

Deakin University is an Australian public university with approximately 47,000 higher education students in 2014. Established in 1974, the University was named after the leader of the Australian federation movement and the nation's second Prime Minister, Alfred Deakin. It has campuses in Geelong, Warrnambool and Burwood, Melbourne in the state of Victoria. Current Vice-Chancellor is Jane den Hollander.Deakin University receives more than A$600 million in operating revenue annually, and controls more than A$1.3 billion in assets. It received more than A$35 million in research income in 2011 and had 1,493 research students in 2012. In 2009, its academics authored 33 books, 233 refereed conference papers, and 705 refereed journal papers. Wikipedia.


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Patent
Deakin University and The Florey Institute Of Neuroscience And Mental Health | Date: 2015-06-05

The present invention relates generally to methods for the treatment and/or prophylaxis of neurological diseases and disorders involving administration of trans 10-HDA. In particular, the methods of the present invention are useful in the treatment and/or prophylaxis of acquired or progressive neurodevelopmental disorders and conditions in mammals. More particularly, methods are taught herein for the treatment and/or prophylaxis of diseases and disorders such as autism spectrum disorders.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: phys.org

Achieving an enhanced rate of ion flow through channels and porous membranes is important for a range of applications, such as energy storage and water desalination, but it is challenging. The collaboration of researchers from Deakin University and ANSTO in Australia, the Sorbonne in France and Drexel University in the US, has just published the study in The Journal of the American Chemical Society. Boron nitride nanosheets are usually hydrophilic and the team used an understanding of the nanosheet interactions in solution during a filtration process to allowing nanosheets to self-assemble into the special structure in aqueous solution. ANSTO instrument scientist Chris Garvey and Guang Wang an AINSE Post Graduate Research Award recipient from Deakin University, used small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) at the Australian Synchrotron as a structural tool to probe the material and characterise the nanofluidic channels in a dry and fully hydrated boron nitride membrane. "The interaction of the nanoparticles in solution allowed the nanosheets to self-assemble into material with an interesting structure as a thin film with enhanced conductivity," explained Garvey. "As you remove the water during the manufacturing/filtration process, the particles come closer together and the interactions between the particles become important in the self-assembly process and the final structure," said Garvey. The boron nitride nanosheets stacked up in a well-aligned manner and formed a lamellar membrane structure. Thousands of parallel slit shaped ionic channels formed in a particular orientation on the membrane that acted as a nanofluidic conduit. "By contrast to an electron microscope, with SAXS you can look inside a material and see how it is assembled, we can see what happens when you put water and salt in a nanosized compartment," said Garvey. Measurements at the Australian Synchrotron at the SAXS beamline allowed them to determine the average spacing between the layers. "The X-ray beam, which is about 200-300 microns in diameter, is well suited for analysing a many nanolayers, giving a statistical perspective on structure," said Garvey. SAXS measurements perpendicular to the beam indicated a lack of structural order along the lateral direction of the membrane, which had also been reported for nanosheets of graphene oxide. The overall structural perspective suggested the ions were being excluded from the inner spaces of the channels in the membrane. Measurement parallel to the boron nitride membrane allowed them to determine that water molecules and ions remained in the intra-layer channels. The way ions pass through the nanoscale fluidic channels is significantly different from the way ions pass through the bulk. The authors concluded that a negative surface charge at the interface between the channel wall and the electrolyte was found to play an important role in ion transport. Garvey said that the physics of filtration processes was not well understood, with further understanding having relevance for many applications, such as assembly of these materials but also including the way clay soils behave. Boron nitride membranes could be an attractive and promising replacement for current 2D nanomaterials subject to harsh conditions. Explore further: New nontoxic process promises larger ultrathin sheets of 2-D nanomaterials More information: Si Qin et al. High and Stable Ionic Conductivity in 2D Nanofluidic Ion Channels between Boron Nitride Layers, Journal of the American Chemical Society (2017). DOI: 10.1021/jacs.6b11100


New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Porto, Portugal (17-20 May) shows that stopping sales of unhealthy soft drinks in sports centres can lead to increases in sales of healthier drinks and the same level of overall sales. The study is by Professor Anna Peeters, Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia and former President of the Australia and New Zealand Obesity Society; and Ms Tara Boelsen-Robinson, Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia, and colleagues. Food retail within sports, aquatic and recreation centres is often nutritionally poor, with high sales of confectionary and sugar-sweetened soft drinks. As health-promoting settings they represent an opportunity to implement healthy food retail strategies. YMCA Victoria, the Australian state of Victoria's largest aquatic and recreation provider, recently committed to removing all full sugar soft drink from all its centres, except full sugar sports drinks. This study aimed to determine the impact of the removal of soft drinks from a sample of these recreation and aquatic centres in Melbourne on sales of unhealthy drinks and of all drinks. Monthly sales data from January 2013 to May 2016 was collected from nine YMCA centres with a kiosk or cafe. All centres had removed full sugar soft drinks by December 2015. Drinks were classified using state government nutritional guidelines* as 'green' (best choice - water, sparkling water with/without sugar free flavour, small reduced fat milk, small reduced fat chocolate milk, tea or coffee with skimmed milk), 'amber' (choose carefully-diet soft drinks or diet sport drinks, fruit juices of 99% fruit juice in servings of 250ml or less) or 'red' (full sugar soft drinks or sport drinks, fruit juices of more than 250ml). A statistical analysis was conducted to determine the effect of the policy, adjusting for various factors including seasonal effects. Analysis was conducted on changes to the volume of ready-to-drink beverages, as well as dollar sales value of all drinks. The researchers found that sales volume (ml) of the 'red' ready-to-drink beverages significantly decreased by 55% and sales of 'green' category (healthy) drink volume increased by 24%, with no overall change in 'amber' drinks; in terms of numbers of drinks sold green drinks rose by 13% and red decreased by 38%. The dollar value of all beverages sold did not change after the intervention compared to the pre-intervention period (this was because more green drinks were sold to start with so a small % increase in initially large green sales made up for a larger % fall in the initially smaller red sales). Professor Peeters concludes: "This innovative policy had its intended effect of reducing purchase of unhealthy drinks, without negatively impacting on overall drinks sales. The development of healthy yet business-friendly outcome measures is important to support the large-scale expansion of such policies." "The YMCA is committed to promoting health yet the food and drinks we were selling in our centres contradicted this," adds Ariana Kurzeme, Manager for Advocacy, YMCA Victoria. "We decided to remove unhealthy items including sugary drinks despite the unknown financial impact. Fortunately our policy has been positively received and our customers are choosing healthier options. We are focussing on removing sugar-containing sports drinks next." The authors say the next steps in their research will be to include further YMCA centres, and also work with YMCA on studies to reduce the amount of confectionary available (such as chocolate bars), as well as replacing all full-sugar sports drinks with the diet sugar-free alternatives over the next year.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences. On landscapes around the world, environmental change is bringing people and large carnivores together--but the union is not without its problems. Human-wildlife conflict is on the rise as development continues unabated and apex predators begin to reoccupy their former ranges. Further complicating matters, many of these species are now reliant on human-provided foods, such as livestock and trash. For this episode of BioScience Talks, we're joined by Dr. Thomas Newsome of Deakin University and the University of Sydney. Writing in BioScience, Newsome and his colleagues use gray wolves and other large predators as case studies to explore the effects of human-provided foods. They find numerous instances of species' changing their social structures, movements, and behavior when these resources are available. Perhaps most concerning, they've found that human-fed populations often form distinct genetic subgroups, which could lead to future speciation events. To hear the whole discussion, visit this link for this latest episode of the BioScience Talks podcast.


"The ability to scale production, along with our low-cost carbon fiber is what will allow LeMond Composites to deliver this material to the masses," says Greg LeMond, three-time Tour de France champion and CEO/Founder of LeMond Composites. "Deakin University's manufacturing process will make it possible to localize manufacturing and make carbon fiber technology more accessible to a wider range of industries like transportation, renewable energy and infrastructure or any industry that benefits from using lighter, stronger, safer materials." Deakin University Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Jane den Hollander said the new technology, developed by its carbon fiber research center, Carbon Nexus, was a game-changer for the future of manufacturing. "This new technology could revolutionize the advanced manufacturing sector around the globe, because it will make carbon fiber more affordable to produce, which will make it more accessible for consumers," added den Hollander. LeMond Composites is about to secure its first supply agreement with a commercial customer, and will use the new process to manufacture and sell carbon fiber starting in September 2017. Although more widely known for his athletic accomplishments, Greg LeMond has been an innovator throughout his life. In 1986 he was the first cyclist to win the Tour de France riding a carbon fiber bike. He also introduced clipless pedals, aerobars, and many other cycling innovations. His interest in carbon fiber and developing innovative products led to LeMond's entry into the carbon fiber manufacturing industry in August 2016. LeMond Composites' team of experienced carbon fiber experts and researchers includes Jamie Riddle, Vice President of Operations, David Church, Vice President of Engineering, Larry Peters, Vice President of Manufacturing, and Mike Hamby, Facility Operations and Equipment Manager.  The team's search for the most innovative, efficient, and cost effective carbon fiber manufacturing process led them to this new technology and partnership with Deakin University.  The immediate result of Deakin University's licensed process is a low-cost carbon fiber product delivered in a standard format that is consistent with the requirements of today's composite industry.  This ensures quick adoption of LeMond's low-cost carbon fiber, which will initially be commercially available as a manufactured product from the Carbon Nexus facility.  LeMond will begin construction of a new commercial carbon fiber facility located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.  Construction will begin this year. Lightweight and strong, carbon fiber offers many advantages over more widely used materials, such as steel and aluminum. One sector where carbon fiber has shown great promise is the automobile industry, where there is a global push to increase fuel economy standards. In the U.S. new Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards have the automotive industry racing to achieve a fleet-wide average fuel economy of 54.5 mpg by 2025. Incorporating LeMond Composites' Grail carbon fiber into passenger vehicles is a key strategy within the automotive industry to achieving the improved U.S.-based and global fuel economy standards. Aside from transportation, carbon fiber has the potential to have a significant impact in areas such as wind energy and infrastructure. For the wind power industry, carbon fiber can be used to make wind turbine blades longer and stronger, increasing their efficiency. Carbon fiber composites can also be used to build, reinforce, or repair bridges, tunnels, skyscrapers, and homes. "Partnering with Deakin University will facilitate our expansion into other markets and open doors that were not possible only a few years ago," said David Church, LeMond's Vice President of Engineering. "With cost no longer a barrier, carbon fiber has the potential to be a game changer in the marketplace, leading to products that are stronger, safer, and better for the planet." About LeMond Composites Founded in 2016, LeMond Composites is focused on the manufacture of high-volume, low-cost carbon fiber composites. With global applications in transportation, renewable energy, and infrastructure, low cost carbon fiber composites will be a key component in the future of efficient energy use. LeMond Composites is located at 103 Palladium Way, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. For more information, please visit www.LeMond.cc. About Deakin University Deakin, named after Australia's second Prime Minister, is a young contemporary university with a reputation for being innovative, nimble and friendly. We aspire every day to combine excellent research and outstanding teaching with a strong focus on the communities we serve. Deakin is ranked in the top 2 per cent of the world's universities in each of the major rankings, and ranking 214 in the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU). Deakin researchers are making a difference through world-class research and innovation. Deakin has a strong sense of community and serves as an economic, social and cultural catalyst enriching each of the communities it serves. For more information, please visit www.deakin.edu.au To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/lemond-composites-signs-global-exclusive-licensing-agreement-with-deakin-university-to-revolutionize-carbon-fiber-production-300478013.html


Patent
Deakin University | Date: 2017-05-31

The present invention relates to polypeptides of SEQ ID NO: 1 (as well as biologically active derivatives thereof), that bind specifically to BACE1 and/or IL-4R. Compositions and methods incorporating the polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 1 (or biologically active derivatives thereof) for treating and/or preventing neurological disorders, such as Alzheimers disease, as well as disorders associated with an increase of the Th2 immune response, such as allergic inflammation, are also disclosed.


Patent
Deakin University and The Florey Institute Of Neuroscience And Mental Health | Date: 2017-04-12

H:\svm\Interwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\SVM\7886476_1.docx-5/06/2015 ABSTRACT The present invention relates generally to methods for the treatment and/or prophylaxis of neurological diseases and disorders involving administration of trans 10-HDA. In particular, the methods of the present invention are useful in the treatment and/or prophylaxis of acquired or progressive neurodevelopmental disorders and conditions in mammals. More particularly, methods are taught herein for the treatment and/or prophylaxis of diseases and disorders such as autism spectrum disorders.


The invention relates to a method of treatment and/or prophylaxis of a disease or disorder of the central nervous system comprising administering to a mammal in need thereof an effective amount of a xanthone-rich plant extract, or a compound derived from a xanthone-rich plant extract. The invention also relates to use of a xanthone-rich plant extract, or a compound derived from a xanthone-rich plant extract, in the preparation of a medicament for the treatment and/or prophylaxis of a disease or disorder of the central nervous system and to a xanthone-rich plant extract, or a compound derived from a xanthone-rich plant extract, for use in the treatment and/or prophylaxis of a disease or disorder of the central nervous system.


Patent
Deakin University | Date: 2015-07-23

The present invention relates to a compositions and methods for treating and/or preventing neurologic disorders such as Alzheimers disease and disorders associated with an increase of the Th2 immune response such as allergic inflammation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INT-04-2015 | Award Amount: 3.72M | Year: 2016

This Project aims to address an increasingly pressing global challenge: How to achieve the EUs development goals and the UNs Sustainable Development Goals, while meeting the global target of staying within two degrees global warming and avoid transgressing other planetary boundaries. EU policies must align with sustainable development goals (Article 11 TFEU). The impacts of climate change and global loss of natural habitat undermine the progress achieved by pursuing the Millennium Development Goals and threaten the realisation of EU development policy goals. Our focus is the role of EUs public and private market actors. They have a high level of interaction with actors in emerging and developing economies, and are therefore crucial to achieving the EUs development goals. However, science does not yet cater for insights in how the regulatory environment influences their decision-making, nor in how we can stimulate them to make development-friendly, environmentally and socially sustainable decisions. Comprehensive, ground-breaking research is necessary into the regulatory complexity in which EU private and public market actors operate, in particular concerning their interactions with private and public actors in developing countries. Our Consortium, leading experts in law, economics, and applied environmental and social science, is able to analyse this regulatory complexity in a transdisciplinary and comprehensive perspective, both on an overarching level and in depth, in the form of specific product life-cycles: ready-made garments and mobile phones. We bring significant new evidence-based insights into the factors that enable or hinder coherence in EU development policy; we will advance the understanding of how development concerns can be successfully integrated in non-development policies and regulations concerning market actors; and we provide tools for improved PCD impact assessment as well as for better corporate sustainability assessment.

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