Cupertino, CA, United States
Cupertino, CA, United States

De Anza College is a 112-acre community college located in Cupertino, California. It was founded in 1967 on the site of the Beaulieu Winery and is named after the Spanish explorer Juan Bautista de Anza. Along with the arrival and growth of Apple Computer, the presence of De Anza College contributed significantly to the growth of Cupertino from a small town to an industrial city and an integral part of Silicon Valley. It consistently ranks #1 or #2 in the state for the total number of students who annually transfer to University of California and California State University campuses. The college is also the home of the California History Center, housed in a mansion called "Le Petit Trianon". The current president of De Anza college is Brian Murphy, replacing Martha Kanter who later became the Under Secretary of Education for the Obama Administration. The average class size at De Anza is 35, and approximately 2,800 students transfer per year. It also attracts a heavy international student population.De Anza College is part of Silicon Valley's Foothill-De Anza Community College District, which also administers Foothill College in nearby Los Altos Hills, California. The district serves the cities of Cupertino, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Sunnyvale and San Jose. The district headquarters is on the Foothill campus.Each year, De Anza invites several celebrities and dignitaries for public speaking engagements at its main theater, the Flint Center. De Anza once held the second largest pow-wow in the Bay Area, but the pow-wow organizers moved the event in 2005.De Anza holds a monthly flea market in its parking lot, which has become a community tradition as well as major source of income for the De Anza Associated Student Body . With a budget of over 1 million dollars, the DASB has one of the biggest student budgets of any community college in California.De Anza formerly had their own campus police. They used to wear slacks and polo shirts, and officers were unarmed. The department was not a POST participating agency and in 2001, the campus police departments at De Anza and Foothill College were merged to become the Foothill-De Anza College District Police. Wikipedia.

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News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has evaluated the best colleges and universities in California for 2017. Of the 50 four-year schools who made the list, Stanford University, University of Southern California, California Institute of Technology, University of California Los Angeles and University of California Berkeley came in as the top five. Of the 50 two-year schools ranked, Santa Rosa Junior College, Pasadena City College, Ohlone College, College of San Mateo and Mission College were the top five. A full list of schools is included below. “California offers students some of the highest-quality academic opportunities in the country, and the schools on our list are the best of the best,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “Not only do these colleges and universities offer outstanding degree programs, they also provide their students with career resources and counseling services that equip them for post-college success.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in California” list, institutions must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit schools. Each college is ranked on additional statistics including the number of degree programs offered, the availability of career and academic resources, the opportunity for financial aid, graduation rates and annual alumni earnings 10 years after entering college. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in California” list, visit: The Best Four-Year Colleges in California for 2017 include: Art Center College of Design Azusa Pacific University California Baptist University California Institute of Technology California Lutheran University California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo California State University-Long Beach Chapman University Claremont McKenna College Concordia University-Irvine Dominican University of California Fresno Pacific University Harvey Mudd College Holy Names University Loma Linda University Loyola Marymount University Mills College Mount Saint Mary's University National University Notre Dame de Namur University Occidental College Pacific Union College Pepperdine University Pitzer College Point Loma Nazarene University Pomona College Saint Mary's College of California San Diego State University San Francisco State University San Jose State University Santa Clara University Scripps College Stanford University University of California-Berkeley University of California-Davis University of California-Irvine University of California-Los Angeles University of California-Riverside University of California-San Diego University of California-Santa Barbara University of California-Santa Cruz University of La Verne University of Redlands University of San Diego University of San Francisco University of Southern California University of the Pacific Westmont College Whittier College Woodbury University The Best Two-Year Colleges in California for 2017 include: Allan Hancock College American River College Bakersfield College Butte College Cabrillo College Canada College Chabot College Chaffey College Citrus College City College of San Francisco College of San Mateo College of the Canyons College of the Siskiyous Contra Costa College Copper Mountain College Crafton Hills College Cuesta College Cypress College De Anza College Diablo Valley College Feather River College Foothill College Fresno City College Las Positas College Lassen Community College Long Beach City College MiraCosta College Mission College Modesto Junior College Monterey Peninsula College Mt. San Antonio College Napa Valley College Ohlone College Orange Coast College Palomar College Pasadena City College Riverside City College Sacramento City College Saddleback College San Bernardino Valley College San Diego Mesa College Santa Ana College Santa Barbara City College Santa Rosa Junior College Shasta College Skyline College Solano Community College Southwestern College West Valley College Yuba College ### About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


Castro A.,Lab49 | Howard W.,De Anza College | Shanbrom C.,California State University, Sacramento
Journal of Geometric Mechanics | Year: 2017

The Monster tower, also known as the Semple tower, is a sequence of manifolds with distributions of interest to both differential and algebraic geometers. Each manifold is a projective bundle over the previous. Moreover, each level is a fiber compactified jet bundle equipped with an action of finite jets of the diffeomorphism group. There is a correspondence between points in the tower and curves in the base manifold. These points admit a stratification which can be encoded by a word called the RVT code. Here, we derive the spelling rules for these words in the case of a three dimensional base. That is, we determine precisely which words are realized by points in the tower. To this end, we study the incidence relations between certain subtowers, called Baby Monsters, and present a general method for determining the level at which each Baby Monster is born. Here, we focus on the case where the base manifold is three dimensional, but all the methods presented generalize to bases of arbitrary dimension. © American Institute of Mathematical Sciences.


Patel B.A.,University of Southern California | Yapuncich G.S.,Duke University | Tran C.,University of Southern California | Nengo I.O.,De Anza College
Journal of Human Evolution | Year: 2017

Songhor is an early Miocene fossil locality in Kenya known for its diverse primate assemblage that includes catarrhine species belonging to the genera Kalepithecus, Limnopithecus, Dendropithecus, Rangwapithecus, and Proconsul. Expeditions to Songhor since the 1930s have recovered unassociated catarrhine postcranial remains from both the fore- and hindlimbs, including multiple elements from the feet. In this study, we describe KNM-SO 31233, a complete left hallucal metatarsal (Mt1), along with several other fragmentary Mt1 specimens (KNM-SO 1080, 5129, 5141, 22235). These fossils were compared to extant catarrhines and platyrrhines, as well as available fossil Miocene catarrhine Mt1s. Morphometric data were obtained from 3D surface renderings and subjected to a number of analyses to assess their phenetic affinity with the comparative sample, make predictions of body mass, and to infer their functional morphology. The size and shape of the Songhor Mt1s are diverse, exhibiting a large robust morph (KNM-SO 5141) similar in size but not in shape to extant African apes, medium-sized morphs (KNM-SO 1080, 5129 and 22235), and a smaller, slender one (KNM-SO 31233) that has a shape resembling arboreal quadrupedal leaping monkeys and suspensory atelines and hylobatids. KNM-SO 31233 is unlike other known fossil Mt1s, and in general, none of the Songhor Mt1s resembled any single extant anthropoid clade or species. The morpho-functional diversity of Songhor Mt1s is consistent with an extensive morphological and phylogenetic catarrhine diversity in the early part of the Miocene epoch. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd


Nengo I.,De Anza College | Nengo I.,State University of New York at Stony Brook | Tafforeau P.,European Synchrotron Radiation Facility | Gilbert C.C.,York College - The City University of New York | And 12 more authors.
Nature | Year: 2017

The evolutionary history of extant hominoids (humans and apes) remains poorly understood. The African fossil record during the crucial time period, the Miocene epoch, largely comprises isolated jaws and teeth, and little is known about ape cranial evolution. Here we report on the, to our knowledge, most complete fossil ape cranium yet described, recovered from the 13 million-year-old Middle Miocene site of Napudet, Kenya. The infant specimen, KNM-NP 59050, is assigned to a new species of Nyanzapithecus on the basis of its unerupted permanent teeth, visualized by synchrotron imaging. Its ear canal has a fully ossified tubular ectotympanic, a derived feature linking the species with crown catarrhines. Although it resembles some hylobatids in aspects of its morphology and dental development, it possesses no definitive hylobatid synapomorphies. The combined evidence suggests that nyanzapithecines were stem hominoids close to the origin of extant apes, and that hylobatid-like facial features evolved multiple times during catarrhine evolution.

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