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Wilkinson M.D.,Technical University of Madrid | Dumontier M.,Stanford University | Axton M.,Nature Genetics | Baak A.,Euretos and Phortos Consultants | And 46 more authors.
Scientific Data | Year: 2016

There is an urgent need to improve the infrastructure supporting the reuse of scholarly data. A diverse set of stakeholders-representing academia, industry, funding agencies, and scholarly publishers-have come together to design and jointly endorse a concise and measureable set of principles that we refer to as the FAIR Data Principles. The intent is that these may act as a guideline for those wishing to enhance the reusability of their data holdings. Distinct from peer initiatives that focus on the human scholar, the FAIR Principles put specific emphasis on enhancing the ability of machines to automatically find and use the data, in addition to supporting its reuse by individuals. This Comment is the first formal publication of the FAIR Principles, and includes the rationale behind them, and some exemplar implementations in the community.


PubMed | Phortos Consultants, Stanford University, Cray, TU Eindhoven and 30 more.
Type: | Journal: Scientific data | Year: 2016

There is an urgent need to improve the infrastructure supporting the reuse of scholarly data. A diverse set of stakeholders-representing academia, industry, funding agencies, and scholarly publishers-have come together to design and jointly endorse a concise and measureable set of principles that we refer to as the FAIR Data Principles. The intent is that these may act as a guideline for those wishing to enhance the reusability of their data holdings. Distinct from peer initiatives that focus on the human scholar, the FAIR Principles put specific emphasis on enhancing the ability of machines to automatically find and use the data, in addition to supporting its reuse by individuals. This Comment is the first formal publication of the FAIR Principles, and includes the rationale behind them, and some exemplar implementations in the community.


Blanke T.,King's College London | Bryant M.,King's College London | Hedges M.,King's College London | Aschenbrenner A.,Austrian Academy of Sciences | Priddy M.,Data Archiving and Networked Services DANS
Proceedings - 2011 7th IEEE International Conference on eScience, eScience 2011 | Year: 2011

This paper analyses the results of the technical and scientific work in the DARIAH preparatory phase, a European infrastructure for digital arts and humanities. We were looking for an infrastructure model that would allow for the integration of services built around communities. To this end, DARIAH will be developed as a social marketplace for services. The paper presents the design decision we made and our proof-of-concept demonstrators and experiments. © 2011 IEEE.


Borgman C.L.,University of California at Los Angeles | Van de Sompel H.,Los Alamos National Laboratory | Scharnhorst A.,Data Archiving and Networked Services DANS | van den Berg H.,Data Archiving and Networked Services DANS | Treloar A.,Australian National Data Service
Proceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology | Year: 2015

Despite the advances in policy and practice for data sharing, surprisingly little is known about the uses and users of digital data archives, about relationships between users and the staff of data archives, or how these behaviors vary by discipline, geographic region, policy, and other factors. Digital data archives are not a single type of institution, however. They vary widely in organizational structure, mission, collection, funding, and relationships to their users and other stakeholders. We present an exploratory study of DANS, the Digital Archiving and Networked Services of the Netherlands, with the goal of identifying methods for studying the contributors, consumers, and role of archivists in digital data archives. Starting with transaction logs that serve management purposes, we present estimates of the distribution of uses and users of DANS. Units of analysis necessary to study user behavior, such as dataset, file, user, creator, and consumer, are difficult to glean from logs that were not designed for these inquiries. We recommend methods for improving the design of data collection instruments and outline the subsequent phases of our mixed-method research on the uses, users, policy, and practice of digital data archiving. © 2015 Christine L. Borgman, Andrea Scharnhorst, Henk van den Berg, Herbert Van de Sompel, Andrew Treloar.


Jansma E.,Netherlands Cultural Heritage Agency Rijksdienst voor het Cultureel Erfgoed | Jansma E.,University Utrecht | Jansma E.,Netherlands Center for Dendrochronology | van Lanen R.J.,Netherlands Center for Dendrochronology | And 2 more authors.
Dendrochronologia | Year: 2012

Existing on-line databases for dendrochronology are not flexible in terms of user permissions, tree-ring data formats, metadata administration and language. This is why we developed the . Digital Collaboratory for Cultural Dendrochronology (DCCD). This TRiDaS-based multi-lingual database allows users to control data access, to perform queries, to upload and download (meta)data in a variety of digital formats, and to edit metadata on line. The content of the DCCD conforms to EU best practices regarding the long-term preservation of digital research data. © 2012 Elsevier GmbH.


Chambers T.,Indiana University Bloomington | Shah S.,Indiana University Bloomington | Urankar A.,Indiana University Bloomington | Kalyan V.,Indiana University Bloomington | And 5 more authors.
Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting | Year: 2013

In this paper we describe the process of mapping researcher information from the Dutch National Academic Research and Collaborations Information System (NARCIS) to the VIVO ontology. Our goal is to use the VIVO ontology to accurately represent these researchers and their organizations, while remaining true to the native language and structure of the Dutch university. To achieve this, we first created an extension ontology to account for differences in the Dutch naming structure and differences in university position description and alignment. Secondly, through the use of language attribute tags, we recorded data in both English and Dutch to achieve better access by both the native Dutch population and the larger English based research community. Finally, we leveraged the SKOS ontology to take advantage of a classification structure, already created by NARCIS, to describe researcher expertise uniformly across the system.

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