Århus, Denmark
Århus, Denmark

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Biering K.,Regional Hospital West Jutland | Biering K.,Danish Ramazzini Center | Hjollund N.H.,Regional Hospital West Jutland | Hjollund N.H.,Aarhus University Hospital | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation | Year: 2013

Purpose Methods of measuring return to work (RTW) following temporary disability are diverse. The purpose of this study was to compare different measures of RTW within a 12-month period using a well-defined population of patients treated with Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) and weekly administrative data on transfer payments. Methods Different RTW measures were defined based on weekly data from 12 months follow-up after PCI and agreement between definitions was expressed as Cohen's kappa. Prognostic factors for RTW were compared using logistic regression. Results Among those working before the PCI, 70 % were back to work at 6 months after the PCI and 76 % 1 year after when using cross-sectional measures and excluding those who left the workforce permanently during follow up. When using a time to event measure, 77 % experienced RTW during follow up, while only 60 % experienced RTW without recurrent sick-leave events during the following year. We found moderate to near perfect agreement when comparing the measures, with lowest agreement between the time-to-event measure without relapses compared to the other measures. When comparing prognostic factors for the different RTW outcomes, we found most associations similar in size, except from the clinical measure left ventricular ejection fraction, possibly related to recurrent sick leave. Conclusions Different measures revealed some differences in proportions of RTW. However, high agreement between RTW-definitions was found. Choice of RTW-definitions should depend on study purpose; simple cross-sectional methods are sufficient in prediction of RTW and analysis of risk factors, while methods capturing relapses are recommended when sustainability, prognosis and vulnerability are in focus. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Jensen J.C.,Danish Ramazzini Center | Jensen J.C.,Herning Hospital | Jensen J.C.,Regional Hospital | Haahr J.P.,Danish Ramazzini Center | And 5 more authors.
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health | Year: 2013

Objectives: Musculoskeletal pain conditions remain a major cause of care-seeking in general practice. Not all patients with musculoskeletal pain (MP) seek care at their general practitioner (GP), but for those who do, the GP's knowledge of what work-related factors might have influenced the patient's decision to seek care could be important in order to give more well-founded advice to our patients. The objective of this study was to elucidate the effects of workloads on care-seeking for back pain or upper extremity pain during an eighteen-month follow-up period. Methods: This is a prospective study with a baseline questionnaire and eighteen-month follow-up. Among the registered patients of 8 GPs, we identified 8,517 persons between 17 and 65 years of age, who all received the questionnaire. A total of 5,068 (59.5 %) persons answered. During the eighteen months of follow-up, we used the International Classification for Primary Care (ICPC) to identify all care-seekers with either back pain or upper extremity pain. Of these, all currently employed persons were included in our analysis, in all 4,325 persons. For analysis, we used Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Analyses were stratified by gender. Results: High levels of heavy lifting, defined as the upper tertile on a categorical scale, were associated with care-seeking for back pain (HR 1.90 [95 % CI: 1.14-3.15]) and upper extremity pain (HR 2.09 [95 % CI: 1.30-3.38]) among males, but not in a statistically significant way among females. Repetitive work and psychosocial factors did not have any statistically significant impact on care-seeking for neither back pain nor upper extremity pain. Conclusion: Work-related factors such as heavy lifting do, to some extent, contribute to care-seeking with MP. We suggest that asking the patient about physical workloads should be routinely included in consultations dealing with MP. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.


Rubak T.S.,Slagelse Hospital | Svendsen S.W.,University Research Clinic | Soballe K.,Aarhus University Hospital | Frost P.,Aarhus University Hospital | Frost P.,Danish Ramazzini Center
Arthritis Care and Research | Year: 2014

Objective. To investigate the risk of total hip replacement (THR) due to primary osteoarthritis in relation to cumulative occupational mechanical exposures and lifestyle factors.Methods. Using register information, we identified first-time THR cases within the Danish working population in 2005-2006. For each case, 2 age-and sex-matched controls were drawn. Persons within 2,500 randomly selected case-control sets received a questionnaire about job history, weight at age 25 years, present weight and height, smoking, and sports activities at age 25 years. The job history was combined with a job exposure matrix. Cumulative exposure estimates were expressed according to the pack-year concept of smoking (e.g., cumulative lifting was expressed as ton-years). We used conditional logistic regression for statistical analyses.Results. In total, 1,776 case-control sets (71%) were available for analysis. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for exposure to ≥20 ton-years was 1.35 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.05-1.74) for men and 1.00 (95% CI 0.73-1.41) for women. Standing/walking and whole body vibration showed no associations. The adjusted OR for body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m2 at age 25 years was 2.44 (95% CI 1.38-4.32) for men and 5.12 (95% CI 2.30-11.39) for women. The corresponding adjusted ORs for an increase in BMI of ≥10 kg/m2 since age 25 years were 2.16 (95% CI 1.25-3.70) and 2.46 (95% CI 1.47-4.13). Sports participation showed weak positive associations, while pack-years of smoking showed no associations.Conclusion. The results indicated a modest increase in risk of THR in relation to cumulative lifting among men and an increased risk in relation to a high BMI at age 25 years and to a gain in BMI in both sexes. © 2014, American College of Rheumatology.


PubMed | Danish Ramazzini Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International archives of occupational and environmental health | Year: 2013

Musculoskeletal pain conditions remain a major cause of care-seeking in general practice. Not all patients with musculoskeletal pain (MP) seek care at their general practitioner (GP), but for those who do, the GPs knowledge of what work-related factors might have influenced the patients decision to seek care could be important in order to give more well-founded advice to our patients. The objective of this study was to elucidate the effects of workloads on care-seeking for back pain or upper extremity pain during an eighteen-month follow-up period.This is a prospective study with a baseline questionnaire and eighteen-month follow-up. Among the registered patients of 8 GPs, we identified 8,517 persons between 17 and 65 years of age, who all received the questionnaire. A total of 5,068 (59.5 %) persons answered. During the eighteen months of follow-up, we used the International Classification for Primary Care (ICPC) to identify all care-seekers with either back pain or upper extremity pain. Of these, all currently employed persons were included in our analysis, in all 4,325 persons. For analysis, we used Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Analyses were stratified by gender.High levels of heavy lifting, defined as the upper tertile on a categorical scale, were associated with care-seeking for back pain (HR 1.90 [95 % CI: 1.14-3.15]) and upper extremity pain (HR 2.09 [95 % CI: 1.30-3.38]) among males, but not in a statistically significant way among females. Repetitive work and psychosocial factors did not have any statistically significant impact on care-seeking for neither back pain nor upper extremity pain.Work-related factors such as heavy lifting do, to some extent, contribute to care-seeking with MP. We suggest that asking the patient about physical workloads should be routinely included in consultations dealing with MP.

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