Danish Energy Association

Frederiksberg, Denmark

Danish Energy Association

Frederiksberg, Denmark
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Trintis I.,University of Aalborg | Douglass P.J.,Danish Energy Association | Munk-Nielsen S.,University of Aalborg
ECCE 2016 - IEEE Energy Conversion Congress and Exposition, Proceedings | Year: 2016

This paper describes the design and test of a control algorithm for active front-end rectifiers that draw power from a residential AC grid to feed heat pump loads. The control algorithm is able to control the phase to neutral or phase to phase RMS voltages at the point of common coupling. The voltage control was evaluated with either active or reactive independent phase load current control. The control performance in field operation in a residential grid situated in Bornholm, Denmark was investigated for different use cases. © 2016 IEEE.


Harbo S.,Danish Energy Association | Biegel B.,University of Aalborg
2013 4th IEEE/PES Innovative Smart Grid Technologies Europe, ISGT Europe 2013 | Year: 2013

To substantiate and structure demand-side flexibility aggregation, a legally binding contract between aggregator and consumers is key. Flexibility contracts are the focus of this work. © 2013 IEEE.


Biegel B.,University of Aalborg | Hansen L.H.,DONG Energy | Stoustrup J.,University of Aalborg | Andersen P.,University of Aalborg | Harbo S.,Danish Energy Association
Energy | Year: 2014

A transition from an oil and coal based energy system to a systems based on renewable and sustainable energy sources has begun in many countries throughout the developed world. As a pioneer, Denmark currently has a wind energy penetration of 30% in the electricity sector and an end goal of 100% renewables in all energy sectors by 2050. The main elements in this transition are an increase in the wind energy production and electrification of main energy sectors such as transport and heating. Activation of flexible consumption in the electricity markets is believed to be one of the means to compensate for the growth of fluctuating renewables and the decrease of conventional power plants providing system-stabilizing services. In this work, we examine the requirements for flexible consumption to be active in the spot market and the regulating power market in the Nordic system and estimate the costs of entering these markets; further, we briefly describe the debated and planned changes in the electricity market to better accommodate flexible consumers. Based on recent market data, we estimate the revenue that flexible consumers can generate by market entry depending on the capacity of the consumers. The results show that consumers should have an energy capacity in the magnitude of 20-70kWh to break-even in the spot market, while a capacity of 70-230kWh is required in the regulating power market under current regulations. Upon implementation of the debated and planned market changes, the break-even capacity will decrease significantly, possibly to an energy capacity as low as 1kWh. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Biegel B.,University of Aalborg | Westenholz M.,Better Place | Hansen L.H.,DONG Energy | Stoustrup J.,University of Aalborg | And 2 more authors.
Energy | Year: 2014

Flexible consumption devices are often able to quickly adjust the power consumption making these devices very well suited as providers of fast ancillary services such as primary and secondary reserves. As these reserves are among the most well-paid ancillary services, it is an interesting idea to let an aggregator control a portfolio of flexible consumption devices and sell the accumulated flexibility in the primary and secondary reserve markets. However, two issues make it difficult for a portfolio of consumption devices to provide ancillary services: First, flexible consumption devices only have a limited energy capacity and are therefore not able to provide actual energy deliveries. Second, it is often difficult to make an accurate consumption baseline estimate for a portfolio of flexible consumption devices. These two issues do not fit the current regulations for providing ancillary services. In this work we present a simple method based on the existing ancillary service markets that resolves these issues via increased information and communication technology. The method allows an aggregator to continuously utilize the markets for slower ancillary service to ensure that its portfolio is not driven towards the energy limitations resolving both the baseline issue and the energy limitation issue. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Meibom P.,Danish Energy Association | Hilger K.B.,DONG Energy | Madsen H.,Technical University of Denmark | Vinther D.,Energinet.dk
IEEE Power and Energy Magazine | Year: 2013

The transition of the Danish energy system to a system based only on renewable energy in 2050 carries many challenges. For Denmark to become independent of fossil energy sources, wind power and biomass are expected to become the main sources of energy. Onshore and offshore wind farms are expected to provide the majority of electricity, and biomass and electricity are expected to become the major sources of heating. On the way toward the 100% renewable goal in 2050, the Danish government has proposed a 2035 midterm goal to cover the energy consumption for power and heat with renewables. © 2003-2012 IEEE.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.rechargenews.com

Denmark’s newest offshore wind park has beaten all earlier offshore price records – this is great news for the electricity customers and it’s also great news for the European wind industry. Sweden’s Vattenfall submitted the lowest bid for Kriegers Flak at €49.90 ($53.50) per MWh for 12 years, and fended off five other competitors. The bid beat all expectations – when the current Danish Energy Agreement was signed in 2012, the bid for this wind park was expected to come in at over €120/MWh. By contrast, the bid price for Borssele 1 & 2 in the Netherlands, announced earlier this year, is €72.70/MWh for 15 years, and the recent Danish near-shore tender was won (also by Vattenfall) at €64/MWh. Kriegers Flak and Borssele 1 & 2 do not include transmission costs, which are being paid by the state, while the near-shore tender does. The low bid for Kriegers Flak can be explained, in part, due to the economies of scale in the 600MW project, and also because Vattenfall expects a new generation of wind turbines to be available by the time the park is commissioned in 2022. New turbines are expected to be more efficient as well as larger — rated in the double digits, in contrast to the currently largest 8MW models. Furthermore, the industry has pointed towards the negotiated tendering process in Denmark as a factor in reducing uncertainties and thus costs. In general, the cost for offshore wind energy parks has fallen drastically in the past few years, after a concerted effort by the industry as a whole, indicating increased industrialization of the sector and economies of scale in Northern Europe. Hopefully, Kriegers Flak signifies yet another leap forward in terms of bringing down offshore wind energy costs. If this is the case, offshore wind is set to play a key role in the decarbonisation of the European electricity sector. These falling costs and signs of a growing and maturing industry will hopefully help create more political certainty about the financing of Denmark’s future energy policy, as well as bring more investor certainty after a turbulent year for the Danish wind sector. Falling electricity prices have led to a heated debate in Denmark about the cost of renewables support as less revenue earned on the electricity market has pushed up the required subsidies — in spite of lower production costs. This has led to total financing costs above what was originally envisioned for the energy agreement of March 2012, which was backed by a broad parliamentary coalition. Consequently, the government has suggested to halt the planned 350 MW near-shore wind power projects; a proposal which currently has not received broad political backing. However, with a bid at less than half of the budgeted cost for Kriegers Flak, support costs are expected to be far lower than were recently expected. This could hopefully allow financing for both Kriegers Flak and the 350 MW near-shore projects. The political discussion on costs has become all the more pertinent due to the ongoing negotiations to shift the cost of financing renewables away from consumers’ electricity bills — which have grown increasingly expensive and are heavily taxed — and onto the government budget. A final agreement is expected before the end of 2016 – including a go-ahead for Kriegers Flak. Projects such as Kriegers Flak are a showcase for the wind industry and for the power of regional projects. Kriegers Flak will be connected to both Denmark and Germany, and as such is also a novel grid-expansion project that will bridge a gap in the infrastructure of the European power system and help ensure security of supply, specifically for consumers in eastern Denmark. The potential for offshore wind is vast. Regional as well as national projects for power generation and stronger grid interconnection can provide sustainable growth and jobs and solidify European leadership in the sector and the supply chain. Regional offshore co-operation can also enhance the cost-efficiency of European energy and climate objectives. This positive story should also buoy all the countries meeting at COP22 in Marrakech. Such low bids bode well for the decarbonisation of our economies cost-effectively, while simultaneously reaching our climate change targets. And once the EU’s Emissions Trading System can be thoroughly reformed and put back on track for reducing emissions, and the carbon price is closer to the levels expected when the ETS was created, a much greater part of these objectives can be driven by the carbon market and be met at even lower cost for consumers. Stine Leth Rasmussen is head of the generation and analysis department at the Danish Energy Association.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.rechargenews.com

Denmark’s newest offshore wind park has beaten all earlier offshore price records – this is great news for the electricity customers and it’s also great news for the European wind industry. Sweden’s Vattenfall submitted the lowest bid for Kriegers Flak at €49.90 ($53.50) per MWh for 12 years, and fended off five other competitors. The bid beat all expectations – when the current Danish Energy Agreement was signed in 2012, the bid for this wind park was expected to come in at over €120/MWh. By contrast, the bid price for Borssele 1 & 2 in the Netherlands, announced earlier this year, is €72.70/MWh for 15 years, and the recent Danish near-shore tender was won (also by Vattenfall) at €64/MWh. Kriegers Flak and Borssele 1 & 2 do not include transmission costs, which are being paid by the state, while the near-shore tender does. The low bid for Kriegers Flak can be explained, in part, due to the economies of scale in the 600MW project, and also because Vattenfall expects a new generation of wind turbines to be available by the time the park is commissioned in 2022. New turbines are expected to be more efficient as well as larger — rated in the double digits, in contrast to the currently largest 8MW models. Furthermore, the industry has pointed towards the negotiated tendering process in Denmark as a factor in reducing uncertainties and thus costs. In general, the cost for offshore wind energy parks has fallen drastically in the past few years, after a concerted effort by the industry as a whole, indicating increased industrialization of the sector and economies of scale in Northern Europe. Hopefully, Kriegers Flak signifies yet another leap forward in terms of bringing down offshore wind energy costs. If this is the case, offshore wind is set to play a key role in the decarbonisation of the European electricity sector. These falling costs and signs of a growing and maturing industry will hopefully help create more political certainty about the financing of Denmark’s future energy policy, as well as bring more investor certainty after a turbulent year for the Danish wind sector. Falling electricity prices have led to a heated debate in Denmark about the cost of renewables support as less revenue earned on the electricity market has pushed up the required subsidies — in spite of lower production costs. This has led to total financing costs above what was originally envisioned for the energy agreement of March 2012, which was backed by a broad parliamentary coalition. Consequently, the government has suggested to halt the planned 350 MW near-shore wind power projects; a proposal which currently has not received broad political backing. However, with a bid at less than half of the budgeted cost for Kriegers Flak, support costs are expected to be far lower than were recently expected. This could hopefully allow financing for both Kriegers Flak and the 350 MW near-shore projects. The political discussion on costs has become all the more pertinent due to the ongoing negotiations to shift the cost of financing renewables away from consumers’ electricity bills — which have grown increasingly expensive and are heavily taxed — and onto the government budget. A final agreement is expected before the end of 2016 – including a go-ahead for Kriegers Flak. Projects such as Kriegers Flak are a showcase for the wind industry and for the power of regional projects. Kriegers Flak will be connected to both Denmark and Germany, and as such is also a novel grid-expansion project that will bridge a gap in the infrastructure of the European power system and help ensure security of supply, specifically for consumers in eastern Denmark. The potential for offshore wind is vast. Regional as well as national projects for power generation and stronger grid interconnection can provide sustainable growth and jobs and solidify European leadership in the sector and the supply chain. Regional offshore co-operation can also enhance the cost-efficiency of European energy and climate objectives. This positive story should also buoy all the countries meeting at COP22 in Marrakech. Such low bids bode well for the decarbonisation of our economies cost-effectively, while simultaneously reaching our climate change targets. And once the EU’s Emissions Trading System can be thoroughly reformed and put back on track for reducing emissions, and the carbon price is closer to the levels expected when the ETS was created, a much greater part of these objectives can be driven by the carbon market and be met at even lower cost for consumers. Stine Leth Rasmussen is head of the generation and analysis department at the Danish Energy Association.


Hansen J.Z.,Danish Energy Association
IET Conference Publications | Year: 2013

In this paper is given an overall assessment of the condition of the medium voltage XLPE cable population in Denmark. The assessment is based on results from Danish failure statistics. It is concluded that there are no significant signs of an increasing failure rate for dry-cured XLPE cables after a service time of a least 30 years. It is also shown that a large part of the failures take place while the system is operated at elevated phase-to-earth voltage on sound phases due to an earth fault somewhere in the system. An analysis also shows that the systems often are operated with an earth fault in 30 minutes or more before the XLPE cable failure occurs, which is interesting when comparing to recommended test duration for power frequency testing of MV cables.


Hedegaard K.,Technical University of Denmark | Ravn H.,RAM lose.dk Aeblevangen 55 | Juul N.,Technical University of Denmark | Meibom P.,Danish Energy Association
Energy | Year: 2012

In this study, it is analysed how a large-scale implementation of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and battery electric vehicles towards 2030 would influence the power systems of five Northern European countries, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Norway, and Sweden. Increasing shares of electric vehicles (EVs) are assumed; comprising 2.5%, 15%, 34%, and 53% of the private passenger vehicle fleet in 2015, 2020, 2025, and 2030, respectively. Results show that when charged/discharged intelligently, EVs can facilitate significantly increased wind power investments already at low vehicle fleet shares. Moreover, due to vehicle-to-grid capability, EVs can reduce the need for new coal/natural gas power capacities. Wind power can be expected to provide a large share of the electricity for EVs in several of the countries. However, if EVs are not followed up by economic support for renewable energy technologies, coal based power will in several cases, particularly in the short term, likely provide a large part of this electricity. The effects of EVs vary significantly from country to country and are sensitive to fuel and CO2 price variations. The EVs bring CO2 reductions of 1-6% in 2025 and 3-28% in 2030 while total costs are generally increased. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Jacobsen H.K.,Technical University of Denmark | Jensen S.G.,Danish Energy Association
International Journal of Electrical Power and Energy Systems | Year: 2012

In liberalised markets the ability to maintain security of electricity supply is questioned because security is characterised as a public good. We discuss if this property can be modified with changing technology. Furthermore, we examine if construction of markets for security can be justified by possible welfare gains. From a welfare perspective it is possible that security levels are too high and obtained with too high costs. Adjusting the effort so that marginal cost for securing supply is at similar levels in generation capacity and in network maintenance could increase welfare even without the need to construct markets. Secondarily, a consumer defined average level of security might improve welfare. Finally, different willingness to pay among customers and construction of advanced markets might increase welfare further. We argue that several cost and welfare improvements can be achieved without constructing complete markets for security. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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