The Danish Energy Agency was established in 1975 as an agency of the Danish Ministry of Transport and was in 2007 transferred to the newly created Danish Ministry of Climate and Energy The agency is headquartered in 44 Amaliegade.The agency is responsible for handling both national and international agreements and tasks linked to production, supply and consumption of energy, and is the responsible agency for efforts to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. It oversees the legal and political frameworks for reliable, affordable and clean supply of energy in Denmark. Wikipedia.


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Kragh J.,University of Aalborg | Kragh J.,Danish Energy | Rose J.,University of Aalborg
Applied Energy | Year: 2011

This paper aims to present an economic overview of the opportunities for energy renovation of single-family houses in Denmark financed over the long term. The paper focuses on the economic difference between energy savings and the repayment of investment.Taking out the average remaining 20% equity in long-term property mortgage loans and utilising it for extensive energy renovation improves both the economy and the extent of included measures.Approximately 30% of energy consumption in Denmark is used for space heating. The existing 1 million single-family houses account for approximately half of this, thus making energy renovation a key factor for the reduction of CO2 emissions.The conclusions were that in average the possible budget for renovation varied between €20,000 and 40,000 per single-family house. The equity of the house was particularly dependant on geographical location and construction period. Different energy renovation measures were analysed in terms of economy showing that a wide range of specific measures had a positive economic balance for the homeowner from year 1. The economic balance between saved energy and repayment of the investment is however very dependent on the assumed future energy price. An example showed that a typical house from 1925, still in its original form, could yield annual savings for the homeowner of approximately €2600, assuming a future energy price of 0.2 €/kW. h. At the current energy price level of 0.1 €/kW. h energy renovation in general is almost economically neutral for the homeowner. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.rechargenews.com

Denmark’s newest offshore wind park has beaten all earlier offshore price records – this is great news for the electricity customers and it’s also great news for the European wind industry. Sweden’s Vattenfall submitted the lowest bid for Kriegers Flak at €49.90 ($53.50) per MWh for 12 years, and fended off five other competitors. The bid beat all expectations – when the current Danish Energy Agreement was signed in 2012, the bid for this wind park was expected to come in at over €120/MWh. By contrast, the bid price for Borssele 1 & 2 in the Netherlands, announced earlier this year, is €72.70/MWh for 15 years, and the recent Danish near-shore tender was won (also by Vattenfall) at €64/MWh. Kriegers Flak and Borssele 1 & 2 do not include transmission costs, which are being paid by the state, while the near-shore tender does. The low bid for Kriegers Flak can be explained, in part, due to the economies of scale in the 600MW project, and also because Vattenfall expects a new generation of wind turbines to be available by the time the park is commissioned in 2022. New turbines are expected to be more efficient as well as larger — rated in the double digits, in contrast to the currently largest 8MW models. Furthermore, the industry has pointed towards the negotiated tendering process in Denmark as a factor in reducing uncertainties and thus costs. In general, the cost for offshore wind energy parks has fallen drastically in the past few years, after a concerted effort by the industry as a whole, indicating increased industrialization of the sector and economies of scale in Northern Europe. Hopefully, Kriegers Flak signifies yet another leap forward in terms of bringing down offshore wind energy costs. If this is the case, offshore wind is set to play a key role in the decarbonisation of the European electricity sector. These falling costs and signs of a growing and maturing industry will hopefully help create more political certainty about the financing of Denmark’s future energy policy, as well as bring more investor certainty after a turbulent year for the Danish wind sector. Falling electricity prices have led to a heated debate in Denmark about the cost of renewables support as less revenue earned on the electricity market has pushed up the required subsidies — in spite of lower production costs. This has led to total financing costs above what was originally envisioned for the energy agreement of March 2012, which was backed by a broad parliamentary coalition. Consequently, the government has suggested to halt the planned 350 MW near-shore wind power projects; a proposal which currently has not received broad political backing. However, with a bid at less than half of the budgeted cost for Kriegers Flak, support costs are expected to be far lower than were recently expected. This could hopefully allow financing for both Kriegers Flak and the 350 MW near-shore projects. The political discussion on costs has become all the more pertinent due to the ongoing negotiations to shift the cost of financing renewables away from consumers’ electricity bills — which have grown increasingly expensive and are heavily taxed — and onto the government budget. A final agreement is expected before the end of 2016 – including a go-ahead for Kriegers Flak. Projects such as Kriegers Flak are a showcase for the wind industry and for the power of regional projects. Kriegers Flak will be connected to both Denmark and Germany, and as such is also a novel grid-expansion project that will bridge a gap in the infrastructure of the European power system and help ensure security of supply, specifically for consumers in eastern Denmark. The potential for offshore wind is vast. Regional as well as national projects for power generation and stronger grid interconnection can provide sustainable growth and jobs and solidify European leadership in the sector and the supply chain. Regional offshore co-operation can also enhance the cost-efficiency of European energy and climate objectives. This positive story should also buoy all the countries meeting at COP22 in Marrakech. Such low bids bode well for the decarbonisation of our economies cost-effectively, while simultaneously reaching our climate change targets. And once the EU’s Emissions Trading System can be thoroughly reformed and put back on track for reducing emissions, and the carbon price is closer to the levels expected when the ETS was created, a much greater part of these objectives can be driven by the carbon market and be met at even lower cost for consumers. Stine Leth Rasmussen is head of the generation and analysis department at the Danish Energy Association.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.rechargenews.com

Denmark’s newest offshore wind park has beaten all earlier offshore price records – this is great news for the electricity customers and it’s also great news for the European wind industry. Sweden’s Vattenfall submitted the lowest bid for Kriegers Flak at €49.90 ($53.50) per MWh for 12 years, and fended off five other competitors. The bid beat all expectations – when the current Danish Energy Agreement was signed in 2012, the bid for this wind park was expected to come in at over €120/MWh. By contrast, the bid price for Borssele 1 & 2 in the Netherlands, announced earlier this year, is €72.70/MWh for 15 years, and the recent Danish near-shore tender was won (also by Vattenfall) at €64/MWh. Kriegers Flak and Borssele 1 & 2 do not include transmission costs, which are being paid by the state, while the near-shore tender does. The low bid for Kriegers Flak can be explained, in part, due to the economies of scale in the 600MW project, and also because Vattenfall expects a new generation of wind turbines to be available by the time the park is commissioned in 2022. New turbines are expected to be more efficient as well as larger — rated in the double digits, in contrast to the currently largest 8MW models. Furthermore, the industry has pointed towards the negotiated tendering process in Denmark as a factor in reducing uncertainties and thus costs. In general, the cost for offshore wind energy parks has fallen drastically in the past few years, after a concerted effort by the industry as a whole, indicating increased industrialization of the sector and economies of scale in Northern Europe. Hopefully, Kriegers Flak signifies yet another leap forward in terms of bringing down offshore wind energy costs. If this is the case, offshore wind is set to play a key role in the decarbonisation of the European electricity sector. These falling costs and signs of a growing and maturing industry will hopefully help create more political certainty about the financing of Denmark’s future energy policy, as well as bring more investor certainty after a turbulent year for the Danish wind sector. Falling electricity prices have led to a heated debate in Denmark about the cost of renewables support as less revenue earned on the electricity market has pushed up the required subsidies — in spite of lower production costs. This has led to total financing costs above what was originally envisioned for the energy agreement of March 2012, which was backed by a broad parliamentary coalition. Consequently, the government has suggested to halt the planned 350 MW near-shore wind power projects; a proposal which currently has not received broad political backing. However, with a bid at less than half of the budgeted cost for Kriegers Flak, support costs are expected to be far lower than were recently expected. This could hopefully allow financing for both Kriegers Flak and the 350 MW near-shore projects. The political discussion on costs has become all the more pertinent due to the ongoing negotiations to shift the cost of financing renewables away from consumers’ electricity bills — which have grown increasingly expensive and are heavily taxed — and onto the government budget. A final agreement is expected before the end of 2016 – including a go-ahead for Kriegers Flak. Projects such as Kriegers Flak are a showcase for the wind industry and for the power of regional projects. Kriegers Flak will be connected to both Denmark and Germany, and as such is also a novel grid-expansion project that will bridge a gap in the infrastructure of the European power system and help ensure security of supply, specifically for consumers in eastern Denmark. The potential for offshore wind is vast. Regional as well as national projects for power generation and stronger grid interconnection can provide sustainable growth and jobs and solidify European leadership in the sector and the supply chain. Regional offshore co-operation can also enhance the cost-efficiency of European energy and climate objectives. This positive story should also buoy all the countries meeting at COP22 in Marrakech. Such low bids bode well for the decarbonisation of our economies cost-effectively, while simultaneously reaching our climate change targets. And once the EU’s Emissions Trading System can be thoroughly reformed and put back on track for reducing emissions, and the carbon price is closer to the levels expected when the ETS was created, a much greater part of these objectives can be driven by the carbon market and be met at even lower cost for consumers. Stine Leth Rasmussen is head of the generation and analysis department at the Danish Energy Association.


Hong C.S.,CAS Shenyang Institute of Metal Research | Tao N.R.,CAS Shenyang Institute of Metal Research | Huang X.,Danish Energy | Lu K.,CAS Shenyang Institute of Metal Research
Acta Materialia | Year: 2010

Microstructural evolution associated with the shear banding in nano-scale twin/matrix (T/M) lamellae of a Cu-Al alloy processed by means of dynamic plastic deformation was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM. The development of a shear band was found to be a two-stage process, namely a nucleation stage resulting in a narrow band composed of nano-sized (sub)grains intersecting the T/M lamellae, followed by a thickening stage of the narrow band into adjacent T/M lamellae regions. The nucleation stage occurred within a narrow region of an almost constant thickness (100-200 nm thick, referred to as "core" region) and consisted of three steps: (1) initiation of localized deformation (bending, necking, and detwinning) against the T/M lamellae, (2) evolution of a dislocation structure within the detwinned band, and (3) transformation of the detwinned dislocation structure (DDS) into a nano-sized (sub)grain structure (NGS). On the two sides of a core region, two transition layers (TRLs) exist where the T/M lamellae experienced much less shear strain. The interface boundaries separating the core region and the TRLs are characterized by very large shear strain gradients accommodated by high density of dislocations. Increasing shear strains leads to thickening of shear bands at the expense of the adjoining T/M lamellae, which is composed of thickening of the core region by transforming the TRLs into the core region with DDS and NGS, analogous to steps (2) and (3) of the nucleation process, and outward movement of the TRLs by deforming the adjoining T/M lamellae. Grain sizes in the well-developed shear bands are obviously larger than the lamellar thickness of original T/M lamellae. © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc.


Nielsen T.R.,Technical University of Denmark | Drivsholm C.,Danish Energy
Energy and Buildings | Year: 2010

This paper presents a strategy for a simple demand controlled ventilation system for single family houses where all sensors and controls are located in the air handling unit. The strategy is based on sensing CO2- concentration and moisture content in the outdoor air and exhaust air. The CO2-concentration is used to ensure adequate ventilation during occupancy and the moisture content is used to ensure adequate removal of moisture produced in the house. The ventilation rate can be switched between two flow rates: a high rate and a low rate. The high flow rate is based on existing requirements in the Danish building regulations and the low flow rate is based on minimum requirements in indoor air quality standards. Measurements were performed on an existing single family house where the controls were installed on the existing mechanical ventilation system. The results showed that the ventilation can be reduced to the low rate 37% of the time without significant changes in the CO2-concentration and moisture level in the house. In theory this gives a 35% saving on electric energy for fans. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


This research presents the differences between the exhaust emission parameters when biodiesel and biodiesel blends are used instead of Ultra Low Sulphur Diesel (ULSD). Measurements have been conducted on three commercial light-duty engines. The engines include an Audi 1.9 TDI that lives up to the requirements of Euro 2, a Peugeot 1.6 liter common rail with original oxidation catalyst and EGR that lives up to the requirements of Euro 4 and a Peugeot 1.6 liter common rail with original Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) and Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) that lives up to the requirements of Euro 4. Tests were performed on a dynamometer running steady state in five representative modes drawn from the ISO 8178 test procedure. The reference diesel was in accordance with EN 590. The biodiesel blends are based on a new EN 14214 animal fatty acid methyl ester (AFME). Biodiesel blends consisting of 20 % biodiesel and 100 % biodiesel have been chosen for the different gaseous emission measurements where NO, NO2, CO, CO2 and HC are measured. Also polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were measured in the 50 % load mode. In order to get an insight into the nano particle emissions from the Euro 4 and Euro 2 engines, the particle number concentration and the particle size distribution were characterized. The results showed that the levels of some emission parameters differed when biodiesel was compared with ULSD. Differences in the emission parameters were also found when the three engine types were compared. Especially the NO2 emission showed a significant difference with regard to engine types and fuels. Copyright © 2010 SAE International.


Hartmann files complaint case against the Danish Energy Regulatory Authority and summons the The Energy Board of Appeal to gain clarity concerning the legal basis in the pending case on pricing of district heating from Hartmann's combined heat and power plant. Hartmann's daily operations and outlook are not impacted by the legal steps or the final outcome of the case. Following a recently passed decision by the The Danish Energy Regulatory Authority on Hartmann's obligation to prepare heating accounts for 2015, uncertainty has arisen concerning the legal basis in the pending case between Hartmann and Tønder Fjernvarmeselskab on pricing of district heating, which was initiated in 2008. The Danish Energy Regulatory Authority has based its new decision in the related case on provisions of the Heat Supply Act, while the Energy Board of Appeal's final administrative decision on the principal matter concerning pricing states that the question of a potential claim for repayment is not regulated by the Heat Supply Act and instead falls within the jurisdiction of the courts. It is decisive to establish certainty about the legal basis for the principal matter. Hartmann has therefore filed a complaint over the Danish Energy Regulatory Authority's decision in the related case to the Energy Board of Appeal. Hartmann has also summoned the Energy Board of Appeal to appear in the City Court of Copenhagen, claiming that the Board's decision on the principal matter is legally invalid and should be referred back for closer reconsideration of the pricing question. In 2015, Hartmann ceased to deliver district heating and was released from its universal service obligation to Tønder Fjernvarmeselskab, and neither the aforementioned legal steps nor the final outcome of the main case will thus affect daily operations, the outlook for 2016 or the targets for 2017. For further information, please contact: Ulrik Kolding Hartvig CEO Telephone: (+45) 31 21 68 72


Hartmann files complaint case against the Danish Energy Regulatory Authority and summons the The Energy Board of Appeal to gain clarity concerning the legal basis in the pending case on pricing of district heating from Hartmann's combined heat and power plant. Hartmann's daily operations and outlook are not impacted by the legal steps or the final outcome of the case. Following a recently passed decision by the The Danish Energy Regulatory Authority on Hartmann's obligation to prepare heating accounts for 2015, uncertainty has arisen concerning the legal basis in the pending case between Hartmann and Tønder Fjernvarmeselskab on pricing of district heating, which was initiated in 2008. The Danish Energy Regulatory Authority has based its new decision in the related case on provisions of the Heat Supply Act, while the Energy Board of Appeal's final administrative decision on the principal matter concerning pricing states that the question of a potential claim for repayment is not regulated by the Heat Supply Act and instead falls within the jurisdiction of the courts. It is decisive to establish certainty about the legal basis for the principal matter. Hartmann has therefore filed a complaint over the Danish Energy Regulatory Authority's decision in the related case to the Energy Board of Appeal. Hartmann has also summoned the Energy Board of Appeal to appear in the City Court of Copenhagen, claiming that the Board's decision on the principal matter is legally invalid and should be referred back for closer reconsideration of the pricing question. In 2015, Hartmann ceased to deliver district heating and was released from its universal service obligation to Tønder Fjernvarmeselskab, and neither the aforementioned legal steps nor the final outcome of the main case will thus affect daily operations, the outlook for 2016 or the targets for 2017. For further information, please contact: Ulrik Kolding Hartvig CEO Telephone: (+45) 31 21 68 72


News Article | January 7, 2015
Site: gizmodo.com

There's been plenty of criticism of wind power over the past few years, as adoption grows and potential side effects emerge. That hasn't stopped energy progressive Denmark, which set a world record by generating a huge 39 percent of its electricity via wind in 2014. According to a new report from Think Progress, the country has added over 100 new offshore wind turbines to its arsenal this year—making it possible to generate nearly 40 percent of its electricity needs out of thin air (so to speak). The Local Denmark adds that the push is part of Denmark's aggressive goal of completing weening itself off of coal power in under a decade. But there's a major caveat afoot here, as well. Wind may have powered nearly half of Denmark's electricity demands, but The Local points out it's still a tiny amount of the country's overall energy usage: But while wind power accounted for nearly 40 percent of Denmark's electricity in 2014, wind only covers about five percent of the nation's total energy use. According to the Danish Energy Association, electricity only makes up one tenth of Denmark's total energy usage and the use of fossil fuels like oil, coal and natural gas still accounts for about three fourths of Denmark's total energy use. So while a new world record for wind power is great, Denmark—and the rest of us behind it—still have a long, long way to go when it comes to weening ourselves off carbon-heavy energy sources. [Think Progress]


News Article | February 15, 2015
Site: www.bloomberg.com

It’s a city where mothers are used to leaving their babies in prams outside cafes and cyclists can bike through parliament square without encountering a single security guard. Now, Copenhagen is full of heavily armed police officers and the constant sound of sirens as the government warns citizens that things are about to change. The Danish capital, which topped a 2014 Monocle ranking of livable cities, is in a state of shock after attacks that erupted on Saturday are being investigated as a terrorist act. Two people were shot dead and five police officers wounded. Security services gunned down the suspect after he shot at them on Sunday following a manhunt that lasted through the night. Danes now need to brace themselves for a new reality, Justice Minister Mette Frederiksen said at a press conference on Sunday. “There’s no room to be naïve,” she said. “These are dark forces that want to hurt us.” As European leaders declare their determination to preserve the region’s way of life in the face of extremism, the risks of doing so are proving daunting. A record security operation is now under way in Copenhagen with units from all over the country sent to the capital. The shootings in Denmark may have been inspired by the January massacre in Paris at satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, police said. About 10,500 soldiers have been deployed in France since that attack. Some European cities are canceling planned events in response to the threat. The city of Braunschweig in Germany called off its carnival after receiving reliable information there was “concrete danger of an attack,” police said on Sunday. Danish police detained two people on Monday thought to have provided the suspect with weapons. The arrests follow raids conducted in the capital. One of the Copenhagen shootings resulted in the death of a Jewish man standing outside a synagogue. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said he expects that the “wave of attacks” against Jews in Europe will continue and called for a “massive immigration” of Jews to Israel from Europe. Copenhagen’s Jewish school said it would be closed on Monday, due to the security risks. Denmark’s Islamic Council condemned the attacks. All religions “must distance themselves from” acts of terror, the council said in comments published by TV2. Standing next to Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt, Frederiksen said people living in Copenhagen need to be aware “there will be a lot more police” on the streets. “This will continue for a while. But we’re experiencing a capital city that looks different now.” The attack started in a cafe bordering one of Copenhagen’s largest parks in the wealthy district of Oesterbro, where an event had been planned to discuss the role of art, blasphemy and free speech in society. One of the speakers was Lars Vilks, known for a caricature in which the Prophet Muhammad is depicted as a dog. Vilks, who was unharmed, was already receiving police protection before the Saturday shooting. A 55-year-old man attending the event was shot dead and three police officers were wounded. Just moments after fearing for their lives as bullets pierced through glass and furniture, attendees at the event carried on the debate, according to Helle Merete Brix, a member of the Lars Vilks committee. “When Lars Vilks and I emerged from the room where we had been hiding, we were surprised to see that some of the panelists had taken the initiative to restart the debate,” she said by phone. “There was actually a power-point presentation going on, which was a sharp contrast to the chaos that had just been. It was a brilliant idea.” Guests at the Krudttoenden cafe, which roughly translates into the Powder Keg and is a popular Copenhagen venue for cultural gatherings, “experienced shock and fear -- and tragedy,” Vilks wrote on his blog. As to the matter of free speech, “where do we stand now with that question?” he wrote. Residents in the area are shaken. Ellise Jensen, a 35-year-old administrator at the Danish Energy Agency who lives about 500 meters from the site of the Oesterbro shooting, said she arrived home at about 3 p.m. on the Saturday. She was out on the street an hour later when she saw police everywhere. “I don’t know what to do about it, how to avoid being in the wrong place,” Jensen said. “I could easily have been there.” The second shooting took place outside a synagogue in the center of the Danish capital, where a 37-year-old Jewish man died after being shot in the head by the gunman. Two police officers were also wounded in that attack. The suspect came from Copenhagen and was known to police. Philip Engelund, a 24-year-old master’s student attending the Copenhagen Business School, was on his way to his girlfriend’s place on Saturday night, about 1 kilometer north of the station where the gunman was shot down by police. “Normally, it’s a very, very great city to live in. You can be out late without being afraid. You don’t have to think at all about being afraid,” he said. “But when I went to my girlfriend’s house between the two shootings, I was nervous. Even today, when I took the bus, I was still looking around.” The government is now struggling to strike a balance by protecting its citizens without undermining the country’s famously laid-back relationship with authority. Danes are used to addressing their politicians by their first names. No government buildings are sealed off by fences and citizens have been free to press their noses up against the windows of the halls of power if they wanted to. Before Sept. 11, 2001, people could even freely enter the parliament building. They now need a pass. Copenhagen Mayor Frank Jensen is urging citizens to treat the attack as an isolated event perpetrated by a madman. “There will obviously be a reaction to such an attack on our values and on our daily lives,” Jensen said in an e-mailed reply to questions. “But Copenhageners won’t allow themselves to be threatened by this form of terror and I hope we will soon see a return to normal life.” Thorning-Schmidt urged Danes to “behave as we always do. Think and speak as we want to,” she said at a press conference on Sunday. “We’re not witnessing a battle between Islam and the west. This is a fight for freedom against a dark ideology.”

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