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News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Western Connecticut Health Network (WCHN) has named internationally known physician-scientist, John A. Martignetti, MD, PhD, an expert in human genetics and genomic sciences at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, as the Network Director of the Laboratory for Translational Research at the WCHN Biomedical Research Institute. Under this collaboration, Dr. Martignetti’s well-established bedside to bench cancer research methodology will be extended to patients at Danbury, Norwalk and New Milford hospitals leading to more personalized and successful therapeutic strategies. He will work closely with the oncology physicians and research scientists across WCHN to build on their nationally recognized efforts. Working alongside new colleagues at WCHN, Dr. Martignetti will continue to explore precision medicine strategies to 1) advance the care and treatment of patients with gynecologic cancer and 2) establish effective biomarkers to enable reliable disease surveillance leading to more predictable care pathways. He will also pursue development of novel therapeutics while studying the genetics of hereditary ovarian and breast cancer. "WCHN offers innovative cancer care that rivals any center in the country," Dr. Thomas Rutherford, WCHN Network Director for Cancer Services said. "As a practitioner, it is very exciting to be working with someone of Dr. Martignetti’s reputation and devotion as we collaborate on new ways to beat cancer. I am looking forward to integrating the excellent cancer programs, services, and providers in our cancer care team at WCHN with the exciting research Dr. Martignetti has underway so our patients are served by the most personalized medicine possible." "We are thrilled to have Dr. Martignetti join the WCHN family and lead our Translational Research team," said WCHN President and CEO Dr. John Murphy. "John has an outstanding reputation for both his clinical and research experience, and he is so deeply committed to solving the needs of those suffering from cancer. His vision and leadership will enhance the great care provided by an excellent cancer team in place today. Working with Dr. Tom Rutherford and our oncology team, his guidance, as we transform cancer care for our communities, will be invaluable." “I am excited to join the very dedicated and committed cancer team at WCHN and look forward to this partnership that is aimed at revolutionizing oncology research and patient care,” said Dr. Martignetti, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Oncological Sciences, Pediatrics, Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. He earned his BA from Columbia College, Columbia University and was awarded his MPhil in molecular biology from Cambridge University. He received his MD and MD, PhD from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York and is widely published in the fields of Cancer Genetics, Gene Discovery, Genomics, and Molecular Biology. About Western Connecticut Health Network Oncology Services Western Connecticut Health Network is the region’s leading provider of cancer care services. Danbury Hospital Praxair Cancer Center, New Milford Hospital Diebold Cancer Center and Norwalk Hospital Whittingham Cancer Center are nationally accredited as Comprehensive Care Programs by the American College of Surgeons (ACS). The Centers are the recipients of “Accreditation with Commendation” from the Commission on Cancer which recognizes cancer programs that strive for excellence in providing comprehensive, multidisciplinary quality care to cancer patients. At Western Connecticut Health Network, our patients and their families receive an exceptional level of care, support and access to clinical trials in a compassionate environment, close to home, by our multidisciplinary care team of experienced medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, surgical oncologists, pathologists, radiologists, oncology nurses along with our oncology nurse navigators and other specialists with advanced training. Research at Western Connecticut Health Network Research and innovation at the WCHN includes the WCHN Biomedical Research Institute where the focus is on cancer and Lyme disease research. This work is complimented by our Global Health, Harold A. Spratt Center for Simulation and Clinical learning, our clinical trials and clinical outcomes and health services research-all funded by generous donors who recognize the life- changing and life-saving work underway. For more information contact the WCHN Foundation. About Western Connecticut Health Network Western Connecticut Health Network is the region's premier, patient-centered health care organization serving residents of Western Connecticut and adjacent New York. With this recent affiliation, the organization is now anchored by three nationally recognized hospitals, Danbury Hospital, New Milford Hospital and Norwalk Hospital, as well as their affiliated organizations. In addition to the three hospitals, the continuum of care offered includes numerous medical practices and sub-specialties across the region, home health care services, a nationally renowned biomedical research institute, the Danbury Hospital & New Milford Hospital Foundation, the Norwalk Hospital Foundation and other affiliates. For more information, visit TheNewWCHN.org. Share your comments with us at Facebook.com/DanburyHospital; Facebook.com/NewMilfordHospital and/or Facebook.com/NorwalkHospital. # # #


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Western Connecticut Health Network (WCHN) announced today that the State of Connecticut Office of Higher Education has approved an application for licensure of a branch campus in partnership with the The Robert Larner, M.D. College of Medicine at the University of Vermont (UVM). Establishing an accredited branch campus will allow a cohort of UVM medical students the option to complete their entire clinical experience (Clerkship and Advanced Integration) at the Connecticut network’s three hospitals – Danbury Hospital, New Milford Hospital and Norwalk Hospital. Danbury Hospital has been an affiliate clinical site for UVM medical student clerkship rotations since 2010, with clinical rotations established at Norwalk Hospital in 2014. The Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) approved the branch campus proposal in February 2015, and the approval by the State of Connecticut allows the nationally recognized teaching hospitals to move forward with its plans. “We’ve had a shared commitment with the University of Vermont for many years and chose them as medical education partners because of the aligned vision and culture and the high number of their medical students who go onto practice primary care and family medicine. Connecticut has a shortage of primary care practitioners so it benefits our patients to work with innovative programs like University of Vermont’s that are dedicated to keeping the students interested in this foundational area of practice,” said WCHN President and CEO, John M. Murphy, MD. “Medical students often stay to practice in communities where they have trained. We appreciate the efforts of our colleagues at UVM to help build the next generation of providers for residents of western Connecticut.” “We are excited to move ahead with our plans to establish an accredited branch campus with WCHN,” says Larner College of Medicine Dean Frederick Morin, M.D. “We’ve worked together successfully for many years to educate outstanding physicians, and this expanded collaboration will bring new opportunities to serve patients across the region.” Jonathan Fine, MD, WCHN’s Director of Medical Education and Jonathan Rosen, MD, Associate Dean of the Clinical Branch Campus will have oversight of the program, anticipated to begin accepting students at the Connecticut locations in spring 2018. An exciting offshoot of our work together is what has become an internationally known Global Health Program, which operates in concert with the Larner College of Medicine to benefit local communities. About Western Connecticut Health Network Western Connecticut Health Network is the region's premier, patient-centered health care organization serving residents of Western Connecticut and adjacent New York. With this recent affiliation, the organization is now anchored by three nationally recognized hospitals, Danbury Hospital, New Milford Hospital and Norwalk Hospital, as well as their affiliated organizations. In addition to the three hospitals, the continuum of care offered includes numerous medical practices and sub-specialties across the region, home health care services, a nationally renowned biomedical research institute, the Danbury Hospital & New Milford Hospital Foundation, the Norwalk Hospital Foundation and other affiliates. For more information, visit WCHN.org. Share your comments with us at Facebook.com/DanburyHospital; Facebook.com/NewMilfordHospital and/or Facebook.com/NorwalkHospital. About University of Vermont College of Medicine Founded in 1822, The Robert Larner, M.D. College of Medicine at The University of Vermont is the seventh medical school established in the U.S. We have a longstanding reputation for educating and training forward-thinking physicians and scientists, fostering groundbreaking research to improve patients' lives, and actively engaging with the community locally and globally. We graduate over 100 physicians and 20 biomedical Ph.D’s each year and have dynamic programs including cardiovascular diseases, the neurosciences, cancer, lung disease, diabetes, and vaccine testing.


Dande A.S.,Jacobi Medical Center | Pandit A.S.,Danbury Hospital
Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine | Year: 2013

Opinion statement: The diagnosis of stress cardiomyopathy is often made during coronary angiography. At this point hemodynamic parameters should be assessed; a right heart catheterization with measurement of cardiac output by Fick and thermodilution methods is helpful. Patients with acute neurologic pathology who develop left ventricular dysfunction (neurogenic stunned myocardium) may not be candidates for coronary angiography and in such cases real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography or nuclear perfusion scan can be used to exclude obstructive coronary disease. Hypotension and shock can be due to low output state or left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. Low output state can be managed with diuretics and vasopressor support. Refractory shock and/or severe mitral regurgitation may require an intra-aortic balloon pump for temporary support. In patients with intraventricular gradient intravenous beta-blockers have been used safely. Hemodynamically unstable patients should be managed in a critical care unit and stable patients should be monitored on a telemetry unit as arrhythmias may occur. An echocardiogram should be performed to look for intraventricular gradient, mitral regurgitation, or left ventricular thrombus. If left ventricular thrombus is seen or suspected anticoagulation with warfarin or low molecular weight heparin is generally advised until recovery of myocardial function and resolution of thrombus occurs. In patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage the use of vasopressors to reduce cerebral vasospasm may worsen left ventricular outflow tract gradient. In hemodynamically stable patients, a beta-blocker or combined alpha/beta blocker should be initiated. Myocardial function generally recovers within days to weeks with supportive treatment in most patients. The use of a standard heart failure regimen including an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or aldosterone receptor antagonist, beta-blocker titrated to maximal dose, diuretics, and aspirin is common until complete recovery of myocardial function occurs. Chronic therapy with a beta-blocker may be advisable. The underlying diagnosis that precipitated stress cardiomyopathy such as critical illness, neurologic injury, or medication exposure should be identified and treated. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Aim. The aim of this paper was to prospectively monitor the performance of an isolated pharmacomechanical thrombolysis (IPMT) device, the Trellis® Peripheral Infusion System, through a company-sponsored registry. Methods. Demographic, thrombus characterization, and procedural data were collected on the treatment of 2 203 extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVTs) in 2 024 patients via case-report forms submitted by the treating physicians. Data were analyzed using simple accrual and percentages. Results. Patients averaged 53 (±18) years of age and were 49% female. Thrombi were located in the iliofemoral (25.1%); iliofemoral to popliteal (19.3%); inferior vena cava (IVC) only or IVC and infrainguinal lower extremity (18.7%); femoral to popliteal (12.2%); isolated femoral (6%), iliac (6%) or popliteal (0.6%); and upper extremity (12.1%). Thrombus chronicity was reported as acute in 34.5% (N=760), acute-on-chronic in 41.5% (N=914), subacute in 10.4% (N=230), subacute-on-chronic in 9.8% (N=216), and chronic in 3.8% (N=83). The thrombolytic agent chosen by the physician most often was tissue plasminogen activator (tPA; 95.8%) at an average total dose per patient of 14.9 ±8.3 mg. Combined Grade III and II venous patency following treatment across all thrombus chronicities was 95.5% and was achieved in a single setting in 83.3% (N=1753) of patients. Average IPMT run time per procedure was 22.3 ±9.4 minutes. Sixteen percent of patients' limbs required additional catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT); 75% required angioplasty and/or stent. No major bleeding complications, symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE), or other significant adverse events occurred during the procedures. Conclusion. IPMT is an effective therapeutic option for the acute management of extremity DVT. Low lytic doses and short infusion times are associated with a lower risk of bleeding than with CDT. Rapid restoration of patency may be associated with sustained valve function and a decreased incidence of post-thrombotic syndrome.


Rajdev A.,Danbury Hospital | Garan H.,Columbia University | Biviano A.,Columbia University
Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases | Year: 2012

Cardiac arrhythmias are important contributors to morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Such patients manifest a substrate resulting from altered autonomics, repolarization abnormalities, and ischemia. Supraventricular arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation and flutter are associated with worsened outcomes, and maintenance of sinus rhythm is a goal. Sudden death is a relatively common issue, though the contribution of malignant ventricular arrhythmias versus bradyarrhythmias differs from non-PAH patients. Congenital heart disease patients with PAH benefit from catheter ablation of medically refractory arrhythmias. Clinical studies of defibrillator/pacemaker therapy for primary prevention against sudden death in PAH patients are lacking. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.


Neychev V.,Danbury Hospital | Krol E.,Danbury Hospital | Dietzek A.,Danbury Hospital
Journal of Vascular Surgery | Year: 2013

The management options of an isolated celiac artery dissection include medical, open surgical, and endovascular techniques. Which strategy is chosen depends on the severity of the dissection, collateral circulation to the liver, the patient's hemodynamic status, and the surgeon's expertise. We describe an unusual case of celiac artery dissection involving splenic and hepatic arteries complicated by hemorrhage. The patient was successfully treated by coil embolization of the splenic and gastric branches. Hepatic arterial blood flow was preserved with a stent graft extending from the origin of the gastroduodenal artery to the orifice of the celiac artery. © 2013 by the Society for Vascular Surgery.


McCormack D.,Danbury Hospital | McFadden D.,University of Vermont
Journal of Surgical Research | Year: 2012

Pterostilbene (trans-3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxystilbene) is an antioxidant that is primarily found in blueberries. Studies suggest that pterostilbene exhibits the hallmark characteristics of an effective anticancer agent based on its antineoplastic properties in several common malignancies. In vitro models have shown that pterostilbene inhibits cancer growth through alteration of the cell cycle, induction of apoptosis, and inhibition of metastasis. In vivo, pterostilbene inhibits tumorigenesis and metastasis with negligible toxicity. Pterostilbene has also been shown to be effective as an inducer of antioxidant capacity in multiple cancer cell lines that may facilitate its function as an anticarcinogenic compound. Additionally, preliminary studies show that pterostilbene exhibits much greater bioavailability compared with other stilbene compounds; however the exact pharmacologic mechanism of pterostilbene and its effects in humans are still under investigation. In this review, we present a comprehensive summary of the antineoplastic mechanisms of pterostilbene based on the results of preclinical studies and highlight recent advances in the study of this dietary compound. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Ryan J.G.,University of Miami | Gajraj J.,Danbury Hospital
Journal of Diabetes and its Complications | Year: 2012

Context: Evidence suggests that numerous comorbid conditions contribute to erectile dysfunction (ED) among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Objective: To review the relationship and mechanism between diabetes, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and ED. Methods: A manual review of authoritative literature from peer-reviewed publications from January 2001 through July 2010 was performed. These publications were further mined to consider the impact of metabolic syndrome as a comorbid condition. Publications from key references were also consulted. Results: The associations between obesity, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome, T2DM, CVD, and depression with sexual dysfunction suggest that sexual dysfunction, particularly ED, is a precursor to CVD. Because these conditions share important risk factors with CVD, identifying them and their relationships with the pathogenesis of ED is likely to be critical to the manner in which primary care physicians screen for and manage this condition. Conclusions: Primary care physicians ought to establish trusting relationships with their patients, providing opportunities for them to probe such sensitive issues as sexual activities, as a means of addressing the possibility of ED. When making the new diagnosis of sexual dysfunction in the absence of metabolic disease or CVD, physicians ought to consider the risk for T2DM and CVD. Associations between metabolic disease, heart disease, and sexual dysfunction further suggest that all patients who are obese and have dyslipidemia, T2DM, and/or depression should be further screened for ED. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Norwalk Hospital unveiled the new centerpiece of its cancer care programming at a Ribbon-Cutting Celebration on Saturday, October 29, 2016 for the Hospital’s new C. Anthony and Jean Whittingham Cancer Center. The 35,000-square-foot facility is part of the largest expansion project in Norwalk Hospital’s nearly 125-year history. More than 400 people toured the new Whittingham Cancer Center, which doubles the Hospital’s existing cancer treatment space and combines the latest in life-saving technologies with the medical expertise and personalized care the community has come to rely upon. Features of the new Whittingham Cancer Center include an outdoor healing garden for patients, families and caregivers, contemporary consultation rooms and patient space with media and refreshments, two private infusion suites, 18 light-filled infusion bays with views of Long Island Sound, a dedicated CT Simulator and two state-of-the-art linear accelerators. The new Center also includes spacious areas for patient support services and for the Hospital’s extensive clinical trials and collaborative research with nationally recognized cancer research centers. Philanthropists and long-time supporters of Norwalk Hospital, the late C. Anthony and Jean Whittingham of Stamford were instrumental in the creation of the original C. Anthony and Jean Whittingham Cancer Center in 1997. The couple’s generosity helped Norwalk Hospital bring advanced cancer care services and technology to the greater Norwalk community. A successful Fairfield County businessman, C. Anthony Whittingham served on Norwalk Hospital’s Board of Trustees, where he was recognized as an honorary lifetime member. “His commitment to cancer care began at a very early age,” said his son Andrew Whittingham, vice chairman of the Norwalk Hospital Board of Trustees and vice chairman of the Board of Directors of Western Connecticut Health Network (WCHN). “My grandmother passed away from ovarian cancer when my father was very young,” said Whittingham. ”My father promised himself that he would help those suffering from illness if he were ever in a position to do so. The creation of the original C. Anthony and Jean Whittingham Cancer Center was just the beginning.” Today, the extended Whittingham family, including Andrew and his brother Michael Whittingham, continue their commitment to cancer care as lead contributors for the new Whittingham Cancer Center. The Whittingham family has committed $4.5 million in support of cancer care services at Norwalk Hospital since 1997. “My family wants to help our community and carry on my parents’ legacy. Until a cure is found, our hope is that with compassionate care, peaceful surroundings, and access to the latest cancer research and technology, patients and families find the journey more manageable,” said Andrew. “In the end, it’s all about family and helping others, and we hope this latest gift inspires others to give back.” Michael added, “With continued community support, we will have a cure for cancer in our lifetime.” Norwalk Hospital President Michael Daglio said the new Whittingham Cancer Center would not be a reality without philanthropic support. “I am deeply humbled by our community’s incredible generosity. Hundreds of people and businesses contributed to the Hospital’s fundraising efforts, and I extend a special thank you to the Whittinghams for their exceptional commitment to Norwalk Hospital and the greater community. Their gift will truly touch countless lives for generations to come.” “The new Whittingham Cancer Center offers a full complement of cancer care services close to home," said Dr. Thomas J. Rutherford, physician director of cancer services for WCHN. “Cancer patients do not need to leave our community to receive the latest treatment options available.” The new Whittingham Cancer Center’s contemporary diagnostics, therapies and technology include: About Norwalk Hospital Norwalk Hospital is a progressive, patient-centered regional teaching hospital serving residents of south-western Connecticut and adjacent New York. The 328-bed acute care, not-for-profit hospital offers Cardiovascular, Cancer, Orthopedic, Neurologic and Digestive Disease care with advanced diagnostics, innovative therapies and state-of-the-art surgery. The hospital is supported by its very generous community through donations to the Norwalk Hospital Foundation. About Western Connecticut Health Network Western Connecticut Health Network is the region's premier, patient-centered health care organization serving residents of Western Connecticut and adjacent New York. With this recent affiliation, the organization is now anchored by three nationally recognized hospitals, Danbury Hospital, New Milford Hospital and Norwalk Hospital, as well as their affiliated organizations. In addition to the three hospitals, the continuum of care offered includes numerous medical practices and sub-specialties across the region, home health care services, a nationally renowned biomedical research institute, the Danbury Hospital & New Milford Hospital Foundation, the Norwalk Hospital Foundation and other affiliates. For more information, visit The NewWCHN.org. Share your comments with us at Facebook.com/DanburyHospital; Facebook.com/NewMilfordHospital and/or Facebook.com/NorwalkHospital..


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

At a private reception at Norwalk Hospital today, Western Connecticut Health Network (WCHN) announced the creation of the Christian J. Trefz Family Endowed Chair in Global Health, the first of its kind in the State of Connecticut and one of only a few hospital-based endowed global health chairs in the nation. At the reception, Majid Sadigh, MD, an internationally recognized global health expert and the director of WCHN’s Global Health Program, was inducted as the Endowed Chair’s inaugural recipient. Established with a generous gift from Christian J. and Eva W. Trefz of Westport, the Endowed Chair advances the work of WCHN’s Global Health Program, launched in 2012 to provide medical residents, students and faculty with hands-on learning opportunities to experience global healthcare systems and to better understand public health issues and the impact of globalization on vulnerable populations. The Christian J. Trefz Family Endowed Chair in Global Health is the eighth endowed chair at WCHN, the parent organization for Norwalk, Danbury and New Milford Hospitals and affiliated organizations. "This Endowed Chair in Global Health promotes an environment of learning and innovation that serves the needs of our very diverse residents,” said Christian Trefz, vice chairman of the Trefz Corporation and owner of a number of McDonald’s restaurants in Connecticut. "We believe that access to culturally compassionate care provided by local experts is so important for thriving residents and communities.” A member of the Norwalk Hospital Foundation Board of Directors, Christian Trefz and his wife Eva are longtime Norwalk Hospital donors who previously named the Hospital’s new Christian J. and Eva W. Trefz Lobby. Trefz has received notable recognition for his commitment to the community, including McDonald’s prestigious Golden Arch Award, which recognizes significant community involvement and business achievement. Trefz and his brother Ernest opened their first McDonald's restaurant in 1964 in Waterbury, Conn. The WCHN Global Health Program has expanded to include collaborative training opportunities for students and faculty at Norwalk Hospital as well as the University of Vermont College of Medicine, for which WCHN serves as a full branch campus. The Global Health Program currently offers clinical training opportunities at partner sites in five countries, including the Dominican Republic, Uganda, Zimbabwe, Russia, and Vietnam. “In an increasingly global community, global health programs are known to attract the best and brightest practitioners, especially in the primary care field,” said John M. Murphy, MD, president and CEO of WCHN. “Global health training can reconnect healthcare providers to the passion that drives our commitment to serve others. We are deeply grateful to the Trefz family for its exceptional generosity and commitment to this vitally important work. The benefit to our hospitals and community is truly immeasurable.” About Western Connecticut Health Network Western Connecticut Health Network is the region's premier, patient-centered health care organization serving residents of Western Connecticut and adjacent New York. The organization is now anchored by three nationally recognized hospitals, Danbury Hospital, New Milford Hospital and Norwalk Hospital, as well as their affiliated organizations. The continuum of care offered includes numerous medical practices and sub-specialties across the region, home health care services, a nationally renowned biomedical research institute, the Danbury Hospital & New Milford Hospital Foundation, the Norwalk Hospital Foundation and other affiliates. For more information, visit WCHN.org. Share your comments with us at Facebook.com/DanburyHospital; Facebook.com/NewMilfordHospital and/or Facebook.com/NorwalkHospital.

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