Dana Farber Partners CancerCare

New York City, NY, United States

Dana Farber Partners CancerCare

New York City, NY, United States
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Kimmick G.G.,Duke University | Major B.,Alliance Statistics and Data Center | Clapp J.,Georgetown University | Sloan J.,Alliance Statistics and Data Center | And 15 more authors.
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment | Year: 2017

Purpose: Tools to estimate survival, such as ePrognosis (http://eprognosis.ucsf.edu/carey2.php), were developed for general, not cancer, populations. In older patients with breast cancer, accurate overall survival estimates would facilitate discussions about adjuvant therapies. Methods: Secondary analyses were performed of data from two parallel breast cancer studies (CALGB/Alliance 49907/NCT000224102 and CALGB/Alliance 369901/NCT00068328). We included patients (n = 971) who were age 70 years and older with complete baseline quality of life data (194 from 49907; 777 from 369901). Estimated versus observed all-cause two-year mortality rates were compared. ePrognosis score was calculated based on age, sex, and daily function (derived from EORTC QLQ-C30). ePrognosis scores range from 0 to 10, with higher scores indicating worse prognosis based on mortality of community-dwelling elders and were categorized into three groups (0–2, 3–6, 7–10). Observed mortality rates were estimated using Kaplan–Meier methods. Results: Patient mean age was 75.8 years (range 70–91) and 73% had stage I–IIA disease. Most patients were classified by ePrognosis as good prognosis (n = 562, 58% 0–2) and few (n = 18, 2% 7–10) poor prognosis. Two-year observed mortality rates were significantly lower than ePrognosis estimates for patients scoring 0–2 (2% vs 5%, p = 0.001) and 3–6 (8% vs 12%, p = 0.01). The same trend was seen with scores of 7–10 (23% vs 36%, p = 0.25). Conclusions: ePrognosis tool only modestly overestimates mortality rate in older breast cancer patients enrolled in two cooperative group studies. This tool, which estimates non-cancer mortality risk based on readily available clinical information may inform adjuvant therapy decisions but should be validated in non-clinical trial populations. © 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York


Mandelblatt J.S.,Georgetown University | Cai L.,Georgetown University | Luta G.,Georgetown University | Kimmick G.,Duke University | And 10 more authors.
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment | Year: 2017

Purpose: Breast cancer patients aged 65+ (“older”) vary in frailty status. We tested whether a deficits accumulation frailty index predicted long-term mortality. Methods: Older patients (n = 1280) with non-metastatic, invasive breast cancer were recruited from 78 Alliance sites from 2004 to 2011, with follow-up to 2015. Frailty categories (robust, pre-frail, and frail) were based on 35 baseline illness and function items. Cox proportional hazards and competing risk models were used to calculate all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality for up to 7 years, respectively. Potential covariates included demographic, psychosocial, and clinical factors, diagnosis year, and care setting. Results: Patients were 65–91 years old. Most (76.6%) were robust; 18.3% were pre-frail, and 5.1% frail. Robust patients tended to receive more chemotherapy ± hormonal therapy (vs. hormonal) than pre-frail or frail patients (45% vs. 37 and 36%, p = 0.06), and had the highest adherence to hormonal therapy. The adjusted hazard ratios for all-cause mortality (n = 209 deaths) were 1.7 (95% CI 1.2–2.4) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.5–4.0) for pre-frail and frail versus robust women, respectively, with an absolute mortality difference of 23.5%. The adjusted hazard of breast cancer death (n−99) was 3.1 (95% CI 1.6–5.8) times higher for frail versus robust patients (absolute difference of 14%). Treatment differences did not account for the relationships between frailty and mortality. Conclusions: Most older breast cancer patients are robust and could consider chemotherapy where otherwise indicated. Patients who are frail or pre-frail have elevated long-term all-cause and breast cancer mortality. Frailty indices could be useful for treatment decision-making and care planning with older patients. © 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York


Ujjani C.S.,Georgetown University | Jung S.-H.,Duke University | Pitcher B.,Duke University | Martin P.,Cornell University | And 12 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2016

Chemoimmunotherapy in follicular lymphoma is associated with significant toxicity. Targeted therapies are being investigated as potentially more efficacious and tolerable alternatives for this multiply-relapsing disease. Based on promising activity with rituximab and lenalidomide in previously untreated follicular lymphoma (overall response rate [ORR] 90%-96%) and ibrutinib in relapsed disease (ORR 30%-55%), the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology conducted a phase 1 trial of rituximab, lenalidomide, and ibrutinib. Previously untreated patients with follicular lymphoma received rituximab 375 mg/m2 on days 1, 8, 15, and 22 of cycle 1 and day 1 of cycles 4, 6, 8, and 10; lenalidomide as per cohort dose on days 1 to 21 of 28 for 18 cycles; and ibrutinib as per cohort dose daily until progression. Dose escalation used a 3+3 design from a starting dose level (DL) of lenalidomide 15 mg and ibrutinib 420 mg (DL0) to DL2 (lenalidomide 20 mg, ibrutinib 560 mg). Twenty-two patients were enrolled; DL2 was determined to be the recommended phase II dose. Although no protocol-defined dose-limiting toxicities were reported, a high incidence of rash was observed (all grades 82%, grade 3 36%). Eleven patients (50%) required dose reduction, 7 because of rash. The ORR for the entire cohort was 95%, and the 12-month progression-free survival was 80% (95% confidence interval, 57%-92%). Five patients developed new malignancies; 3 had known risk factors before enrollment. Given the increased toxicity and required dose modifications, as well as the apparent lack of additional clinical benefit to the rituximab-lenalidomide doublet, further investigation of the regimen in this setting seems unwarranted. The study was registered with www.ClinicalTrials.gov as #NCT01829568. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.


PubMed | Ohio State University, University of Ferrara, University of Alabama at Birmingham and Hematology
Type: | Journal: Cancer research | Year: 2016

Monosomy of chromosome 7 is the most frequent autosomal monosomy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), where it associates with poor clinical outcomes. However, molecular features associated with this sole monosomy subtype (-7 AML) which may give insights into the basis for its poor prognosis have not been characterized. In this study, we analyzed 36 cases of -7 AML for mutations in 81 leukemia/cancer-associated genes using a customized targeted next-generation sequencing panel (Miseq). Global gene and microRNA expression profiles were also determined using paired RNA and small RNA sequencing data. Notably, gene mutations were detected in all the major AML-associated functional groups, which include activated signaling, chromatin remodeling, cohesin complex, methylation, NPM1, spliceosome, transcription factors and tumor suppressors. Gene mutations in the activated signaling and chromatin remodeling groups were relatively more frequent in patients <60 years of age, who also had more mutations in the methylation and spliceosome groups compared to patients {greater than or equal to} 60 years of age. Novel recurrent mutational events in AML were identified in the SMARCA2 gene. In patients {greater than or equal to} 60 years of age, the presence of spliceosome mutations associated with a lower complete remission rate (p=0.03). RNA sequencing revealed distinct gene and microRNA expression patterns between the sole -7 and non-7 AML cases, with reduced expression as expected of many genes and microRNAs mapped to chromosome 7, and overexpression of ID1, MECOM, and PTPRM, among others. Overall, our findings illuminate a number of molecular features of the underlying aggressive pathobiology in -7 AML patients.


PubMed | Dana Farber Partners CancerCare, Ohio State University, University of Maryland, Baltimore, University of Alabama at Birmingham and 2 more.
Type: | Journal: Leukemia | Year: 2016

Core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) is defined by the presence of either t(8;21)(q22;q22)/RUNX1-RUNX1T1 or inv(16)(p13.1q22)/t(16;16)(p13.1;q22)/CBFB-MYH11. The resulting fusion genes require a second hit to initiate leukemogenesis. Mutation assessment of 177 adults with CBF-AML, including 68 with t(8;21) and 109 with inv(16)/t(16;16), identified not only mutations well known in CBF-AML but also mutations in the CCND1 and CCND2 genes, which represent novel frequent molecular alterations in AML with t(8;21). Altogether, CCND1 (n=2) and CCND2 (n=8) mutations were detected in 10 (15%) patients with t(8;21) in our cohort. A single CCND2 mutation was also found in 1 (0.9%) patient with inv(16). In contrast, CCND1 and CCND2 mutations were detected in only 11 (0.77%) of 1426 non-CBF-AML patients. All CCND2 mutations cluster around the highly conserved amino-acid residue threonine 280 (Thr280). We show that Thr280Ala-mutated CCND2 leads to increased phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein, thereby causing significant cell cycle changes and increased proliferation of AML cell lines. The identification of CCND1 and CCND2 mutations as frequent mutational events in t(8;21) AML may provide further justification for cell cycle-directed therapy in this disease.Leukemia advance online publication, 6 January 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2016.332.


Straus D.J.,Sloan Kettering Cancer Center | Johnson J.L.,Duke University | Lacasce A.S.,Dana Farber Partners CancerCare | Bartlett N.L.,University of Washington | And 10 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2011

To reduce doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine toxicity, the Cancer and Leukemia Group B conducted a phase 2 trial of doxorubicin, vinblastine, and gemcitabine for newly diagnosed, nonbulky stages I and II Hodgkin lymphoma. Ninety-nine assessable patients received 6 cycles of doxorubicin 25 mg/m2, vinblastine 6 mg/m2, and gemcitabine 800 mg/m2 (1000 mg/m2 in first 6) on days 1 and 15 every 28 days. Computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) were performed before and after 2 and 6 cycles. Complete remission (CR)/CR unconfirmed was achieved in 72 of 99 patients (72.7%) and partial remission in 24 of 99 patients (24.2%). The CR rate was 81% when using PET criteria. Two patients have died of Hodgkin lymphoma progression. Median follow-up for nonprogressing patients is 3.3 years. The progression-free survival (PFS) at 3 years was 77% (95% confidence interval, 68%-84%). The relapse rate was less than 10% for patients with favorable prognostic factors. The 2-year PFS for cycle 2 PET-negative and-positive patients was 88% and 54%, respectively (P =.0009), compared with 89% and 27% for cycle 6 PET-negative and-positive patients (P =.0001). Although the CR rate and PFS were lower than anticipated, patients with favorable prognostic features had a low rate of relapse. Cycle 2 PET and cycle 6 PET were predictive of PFS. This clinical trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00086801. © 2011 by The American Society of Hematology.


Liu J.,Dana Farber Partners CancerCare | Cristea M.C.,City of Hope | Frankel P.,City of Hope | Neuhausen S.L.,Beckman Research Institute | And 7 more authors.
Cancer Genetics | Year: 2012

Previous studies have suggested that BRCA-related epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) conveys improved survival compared with that of sporadic EOC, but few studies have evaluated differences between BRCA genotypes. We compared characteristics and outcome by genotype in BRCA-associated EOC. Patients with BRCA-associated EOC who were diagnosed between January 30,1981, and December 30, 2008, were retrospectively identified through institutional review board-approved registry studies. We examined clinical characteristics, including event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS), for BRCA1 versus BRCA2 patients. We identified 197 cases (148 BRCA1 cases; 49 BRCA2 cases); the median follow-up period was 63 months. BRCA2 patients were older (55.4 vs. 51.1 y; P < 0.01) and had fewer poorly differentiated tumors (67% vs. 82%; P < 0.05). No difference in EFS was observed. OS at 5 years was 75% in BRCA2 patients versus 61% in BRCA1 patients; this was not statistically significant. A non-significant trend toward improved OS was observed in BRCA2 patients with advanced-stage disease (hazard ratio = 0.59; 95% confidence interval 0.32-1.08). Age and grade differed significantly between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers in our study population. Whereas no overall differences in EFS or OS were observed, there was a trend toward improved OS in BRCA2 carriers with advanced-stage disease. This may reflect important differences between BRCA genotypes and should be validated in larger studies. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Dana Farber Partners CancerCare
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Cancer genetics | Year: 2012

Previous studies have suggested that BRCA-related epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) conveys improved survival compared with that of sporadic EOC, but few studies have evaluated differences between BRCA genotypes. We compared characteristics and outcome by genotype in BRCA-associated EOC. Patients with BRCA-associated EOC who were diagnosed between January 30,1981, and December 30, 2008, were retrospectively identified through institutional review board-approved registry studies. We examined clinical characteristics, including event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS), for BRCA1 versus BRCA2 patients. We identified 197 cases (148 BRCA1 cases; 49 BRCA2 cases); the median follow-up period was 63 months. BRCA2 patients were older (55.4 vs. 51.1 y; P < 0.01) and had fewer poorly differentiated tumors (67% vs. 82%; P < 0.05). No difference in EFS was observed. OS at 5 years was 75% in BRCA2 patients versus 61% in BRCA1 patients; this was not statistically significant. A non-significant trend toward improved OS was observed in BRCA2 patients with advanced-stage disease (hazard ratio = 0.59; 95% confidence interval 0.32-1.08). Age and grade differed significantly between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers in our study population. Whereas no overall differences in EFS or OS were observed, there was a trend toward improved OS in BRCA2 carriers with advanced-stage disease. This may reflect important differences between BRCA genotypes and should be validated in larger studies.

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