Liaoning Dalian Blood Center

Dalian, China

Liaoning Dalian Blood Center

Dalian, China
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Li L.,Peking Union Medical College | Xu T.,Xinjiang Yili Blood Center | Yang T.,Shanxi Changzhi Blood Center | Zang L.,Liaoning Dalian Blood Center | And 14 more authors.
Transfusion | Year: 2016

BACKGROUND Screening of blood donors for antibody to human immunodeficiency virus Types 1 and 2 (anti-HIV-1/2) and/or HIV nucleic acid test (NAT) is a well-established venue to prevent HIV transfusion-transmitted disease. However, with the current available technologies, HIV testing may result in donor loss due to false-positive results. This study intended to establish a donor reentry procedure for HIV screening-reactive donors in China. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS From September 1, 2013, to August 31, 2014, a total of 465 donors from 14 Chinese blood centers were enrolled in this study. Enrollment criteria include all donors who were screened reactive or belonged to the "gray zone" by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and/or reactive by NAT when tested at the local blood centers. All donor samples were sent to a central HIV confirmation laboratory where anti-HIV-1/2 and HIV individual-donation NATs were conducted. If the results were reactive for anti-HIV-1/2, then the samples were tested with a recombinant immunoblot assay. RESULTS Based on the repeat testing at the central HIV confirmation laboratory 8 or 16 weeks after the study, 252 donors of 465 (54.2%) who completed the study could be classified in two categories for HIV status: 45 (18%) true positive and 207 (82%) false positive. A total of 213 of 465 (45.8%) donors were lost on follow-up and, thus, their HIV status cannot be determined with certainty. Based on these data, a donor reentry procedure was proposed. CONCLUSION Based on our proposed donor reentry procedure for HIV screening-reactive donors, a majority of screening-positive donors (82%, 207/252) can be reentered safely. © 2015 AABB.


PubMed | Henan Kaifeng Blood Center, Fujian Blood Center, Sichuan Mianyang Blood Center, Xinjiang Yili Blood Center and 11 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Transfusion | Year: 2016

Screening of blood donors for antibody to human immunodeficiency virus Types 1 and 2 (anti-HIV-1/2) and/or HIV nucleic acid test (NAT) is a well-established venue to prevent HIV transfusion-transmitted disease. However, with the current available technologies, HIV testing may result in donor loss due to false-positive results. This study intended to establish a donor reentry procedure for HIV screening-reactive donors in China.From September 1, 2013, to August 31, 2014, a total of 465 donors from 14 Chinese blood centers were enrolled in this study. Enrollment criteria include all donors who were screened reactive or belonged to the gray zone by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and/or reactive by NAT when tested at the local blood centers. All donor samples were sent to a central HIV confirmation laboratory where anti-HIV-1/2 and HIV individual-donation NATs were conducted. If the results were reactive for anti-HIV-1/2, then the samples were tested with a recombinant immunoblot assay.Based on the repeat testing at the central HIV confirmation laboratory 8 or 16 weeks after the study, 252 donors of 465 (54.2%) who completed the study could be classified in two categories for HIV status: 45 (18%) true positive and 207 (82%) false positive. A total of 213 of 465 (45.8%) donors were lost on follow-up and, thus, their HIV status cannot be determined with certainty. Based on these data, a donor reentry procedure was proposed.Based on our proposed donor reentry procedure for HIV screening-reactive donors, a majority of screening-positive donors (82%, 207/252) can be reentered safely.


PubMed | Liaoning Dalian Blood Center, Rowan University and Peking Union Medical College
Type: | Journal: Transfusion medicine reviews | Year: 2016

Since the establishment of Peoples Republic of China in 1949, the Chinese government has encountered several catastrophes related to transfusion transmitted diseases. The governments increasing attention to blood safety has prompted the initiation of a series of policies and measures that have enhanced the level of safety for the blood supply and met the basic clinical demands of blood for 1.3 billion people in the country. Blood donation screening strategies in China predominantly comprise donor screening and donor testing. Donor screening includes selection of low-risk blood donors by the use of a donor history questionnaire, predonation physical examination, and initial rapid donor testing. Donor testing includes direct pathogen detection and serology tests. The year 1998 marked the most transformative change in blood donor selection and screening policies in China. Before 1998, paid donation was the predominant mode of blood donation. Donor screening and donor testing were conducted before donation, and only those who were eligible were allowed to donate. To ensure the safety of blood, donor testing was performed again after donation. After the implementation of the Blood Donation Law in 1998, to promote voluntary and unpaid donation, predonation donor testing was eliminated to reduce the amount of waiting time and to provide a more convenient donation experience for blood donors. However, it is the national requirement that donated blood should undergo 2 rounds of testing using different equipment or reagents, conducted by different personnel. Donor selection has transitioned from paid donation and obligatory donation to voluntary donation with fixed volunteer groups, as the latter mode of donation provides the lowest risks. Donations are currently screened for syphilis, hepatitis C virus, HIV, and hepatitis B virus (HBV). Units, previously typed only for ABO, are now routinely tested for both ABO and Rh(D). Innovations in testing technologies and methods have also brought changes to screening parameters. For instance, screening for HBV pathogens evolved from the early use of hemagglutination method to the later use of radioimmunoassay, independent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and now the widespread application of nucleic acid test (NAT). Since 2010, the Chinese government has established NAT capacity in several blood centers; and in 2015, the government invested 900 million RMB on the nationwide expansion of NAT. Although the Chinese government has worked to enhance blood safety, many challenges remain. Concern exists for rising rates of HIV infection. The existence of occult HBV infection and the transmission of emerging blood-borne diseases continue to challenge the safety of the blood supply.

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