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Saitama, Japan

Nei D.,Japan National Food Research Institute | Bari M.L.,University of Dhaka | Enomoto K.,Daisey Machinery Co.
Food Control | Year: 2013

The majority of bean sprout-related outbreaks have been associated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella, and an effective method to inactivate these organisms on seeds prior to sprouting is important to avoid foodborne pathogen diseases. We have previously tested treatment with a combination of hot water and chlorine, and a high bactericidal effect without decreases in the germination ratio was observed on mung bean seeds produced in China. To evaluate the versatility of this treatment, the present study confirmed whether our disinfection treatment can be applied to mung bean seeds produced in another country (Myanmar). A more than 5.0 log CFU/g reduction of E. coli O157:H7 was achieved when the mung bean seeds were treated with hot water at 85 °C for 10-40 s, followed by soaking in a 2000 ppm chlorine solution for 2 h; the hot water treatment at 85 °C for 40 s followed by the chlorine treatment completely eliminated E. coli O157:H7 from the mung bean seeds. Additionally, a more than 5.0 log CFU/g reduction was obtained for Salmonella after the hot water treatment at 85 °C followed by the chlorine treatment. These treatments did not significantly affect the viability and germination of the mung bean seeds, and a sufficient yield for commercial uses was obtained. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Nei D.,Japan National Food Research Institute | Latiful B.M.,University of Dhaka | Enomoto K.,Daisey Machinery Co. | Inatsu Y.,Japan National Food Research Institute | Kawamoto S.,Japan National Food Research Institute
Foodborne Pathogens and Disease | Year: 2011

The majority of seed sprout-related outbreaks have been associated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella. Therefore, we aimed to find an effective method to inactivate these organisms on seeds before sprouting. Treatment with 8.7% (v/v) acetic acid at 55°C for 2-3h reduced the population of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella inoculated on alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and radish seeds (Raphanus sativus L.) by more than 5.0log CFU/g, and a longer treatment time completely eliminated the E. coli O157:H7 population. The E. coli O157:H7 populations were reduced to an undetectable level with a gaseous acetic acid treatment for 48h. After enrichment, no E. coli O157:H7 were found in the alfalfa and radish seeds (25g). However, these treatments were unable to eliminate Salmonella in both seed types. No significant difference between the germination rates of treated alfalfa seeds and control seeds was found, and germination rates greater than 95% were obtained for the radish seeds. Although chlorine washing is commonly used for seed decontamination, chlorine washing at 200 and 20,000ppm resulted in a reduction of pathogens by less than or equal to 3log CFU/g. Therefore, these results suggested that gaseous acetic acid is more effective than chlorine washing in controlling pathogenic bacteria on sprout seeds. © 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Source


Nei D.,Japan National Food Research Institute | Enomoto K.,Daisey Machinery Co. | Yamamoto K.,Japan National Food Research Institute
Foodborne Pathogens and Disease | Year: 2014

Most outbreaks of foodborne illness related to sprout consumption are ascribed to bacterial contamination of its seeds, and they need disinfection before sprouting. Recently, gaseous acetic acid (GAA) treatment received great attention as a method for seed disinfection. In this study, the effect of GAA treatment on alfalfa seed disinfection was evaluated in a large-scale device to simulate practical applications. Alfalfa seeds (3 kg) inoculated with Escherichia coli were treated with 8.7% (vol/vol) GAA at 55°C for 1-3 h. The population of E. Coli was significantly reduced (p<0.05), and the reduction was larger with longer exposure times. After 3-h treatment, a maximum decrease by more than 5 log colony-forming units/g was observed. The germination ratio of alfalfa seeds was not affected by the treatments under all the conditions. The results indicated that the GAA treatment has a potential for practical application to reduce the risk of foodborne illness caused by consumption of sprouts. © Copyright 2014, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2014. Source


Bari M.L.,University of Dhaka | Enomoto K.,Daisey Machinery Co. | Nei D.,Japan National Agriculture and Food Research Organization | Kawamoto S.,Japan National Agriculture and Food Research Organization
Japan Agricultural Research Quarterly | Year: 2011

The majority of seed sprout-related outbreaks has been associated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella. Therefore, it is necessary to find an effective method to inactivate possible pathogenic bacterial populations on the seeds prior to sprouting. In general, sanitizing is more effective in reducing contamination on seeds than on sprouts. A successful seed decontamination treatment must inactivate microbial pathogens while preserving seed viability, germination, and vigor. Seeds vary in sensitivity to antimicrobial agents and other treatments, which determine how well they germinate and grow after treatment. In addition, a treatment that is effective for one type of seed may not be applicable to all types of seeds. Seeds vary in surface features, which may influence how well an antimicrobial agent can access and inactivate pathogens on or in the seed. The use of a number of physical, non-thermal processing technologies, alone or in combination with antimicrobial chemicals, could be useful for seed decontamination. Until now, hot water treatment at 85°C for 40 seconds followed by cooling in cold water for 30 sec and soaking in chlorine water was found effective in inactivating pathogens while preserving seed viability, germination, and vigor. Therefore, hot water treatment could be an effective seed decontamination method for mung bean seeds intended for sprout production. Source


Bari L.,Japan National Food Research Institute | Enomoto K.,Daisey Machinery Co. | Nei D.,Japan National Food Research Institute | Kawamoto S.,Japan National Food Research Institute
Foodborne Pathogens and Disease | Year: 2010

A majority of the seed sprout-related outbreaks have been associated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. Therefore, it is necessary to find an effective method to inactivate these microorganisms on the seeds before sprouting. When treatment with hot water at 85°C for 40sec followed by dipping in cold water for 30sec and soaking into chlorine water (2000ppm) for 2h was performed, no viable pathogens were found in the enrichment medium and during the sprouting process. The germination yield of the seed was not affected significantly (p>0.05). Therefore, these treatments could be useful for the decontamination method of mung bean seeds intended for sprout production. © 2009, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Source

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