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Rosemont, IL, United States

Quann E.E.,Dairy Management Inc. | Fulgoni V.L.,Nutrition Impact LLC | Auestad N.,Nutrition Insights LLC
Nutrition Journal | Year: 2015

Background: A large portion of Americans are not meeting the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) for several essential vitamins and minerals due to poor dietary choices. Dairy products are a key source of many of the nutrients that are under consumed, but children and adults do not consume the recommended amounts from this food group. This study modeled the impact of meeting daily recommended amounts of dairy products on population-based nutrient intakes. Methods: Two-day 24-h dietary recalls collected from participants ≥2 years (n = 8944) from the 2007-2010 What We Eat in America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were analyzed. Databases available from the WWEIA/NHANES and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) were used to determine nutrient, food group, and dietary supplement intakes. Modeling was performed by adding the necessary number of dairy servings, using the dairy composite designed by USDA, to each participant's diet to meet the dairy recommendations outlined by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. All analyses included sample weights to account for the NHANES survey design. Results: The majority of children 4 years and older (67.4-88.8 %) and nearly all adults (99.0-99.6 %) fall below the recommended 2.5-3 daily servings of dairy products. Increasing dairy consumption to recommended amounts would result in a significant reduction in the percent of adults with calcium, magnesium, and vitamin A intakes below the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) when considering food intake alone (0-2.0 vs. 9.9-91.1 %; 17.3-75.0 vs. 44.7-88.5 %; 0.1-15.1 vs. 15.3-48.0 %, respectively), as well as food and dietary supplement intake. Minimal, but significant, improvements were observed for the percent of people below the EAR for vitamin D (91.7-99.9 vs. 91.8-99.9 %), and little change was achieved for the large percentage of people below the Adequate Intake for potassium. Conclusions: Increasing dairy food consumption to recommended amounts is one practical dietary change that could significantly improve the population's adequacy for certain vitamins and minerals that are currently under-consumed, as well as have a positive impact on health. © 2015 Quann et al.


Quann E.E.,Dairy Management Inc. | Fulgoni V.L.,Nutrition Impact LLC | Auestad N.,Nutrition Insights LLC
South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition | Year: 2016

Background: A large portion of Americans are not meeting the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) for several essential vitamins and minerals due to poor dietary choices. Dairy products are a key source of many of the nutrients that are under consumed, but children and adults do not consume the recommended amounts from this food group. This study modelled the impact of meeting daily recommended amounts of dairy products on population-based nutrient intakes. Methods: Two-day 24-h dietary recalls collected from participants ≥2 years (n = 8944) from the 2007–2010 What We Eat in America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were analysed. Databases available from the WWEIA/NHANES and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) were used to determine nutrient, food group, and dietary supplement intakes. Modelling was performed by adding the necessary number of dairy servings, using the dairy composite designed by USDA, to each participant's diet to meet the dairy recommendations outlined by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. All analyses included sample weights to account for the NHANES survey design. Results: The majority of children 4 years and older (67.4–88.8%) and nearly all adults (99.0–99.6%) fall below the recommended 2.5–3 daily servings of dairy products. Increasing dairy consumption to recommended amounts would result in a significant reduction in the percent of adults with calcium, magnesium, and vitamin A intakes below the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) when considering food intake alone (0–2.0 vs. 9.9–91.1%; 17.3–75.0 vs. 44.7–88.5%; 0.1–15.1 vs. 15.3–48.0%, respectively), as well as food and dietary supplement intake. Minimal, but significant, improvements were observed for the percent of people below the EAR for vitamin D (91.7–99.9 vs. 91.8–99.9%), and little change was achieved for the large percentage of people below the Adequate Intake for potassium. Conclusions: Increasing dairy food consumption to recommended amounts is one practical dietary change that could significantly improve the population's adequacy for certain vitamins and minerals that are currently under-consumed, as well as have a positive impact on health. © Medpharm.


Agarwal S.,Dairy Management Inc. | Beausire R.L.W.,KaiNutra LLC | Patel S.,P.A. College | Patel H.,South Dakota State University
Journal of Food Science | Year: 2015

Milk protein concentrates (MPCs) are complete dairy proteins (containing both caseins and whey proteins) that are available in protein concentrations ranging from 42% to 85%. As the protein content of MPCs increases, the lactose levels decrease. MPCs are produced by ultrafiltration or by blending different dairy ingredients. Although ultrafiltration is the preferred method for producing MPCs, they also can be produced by precipitating the proteins out of milk or by dry-blending the milk proteins with other milk components. MPCs are used for their nutritional and functional properties. For example, MPC is high in protein content and averages approximately 365 kcal/100 g. Higher-protein MPCs provide protein enhancement and a clean dairy flavor without adding significant amounts of lactose to food and beverage formulations. MPCs also contribute valuable minerals, such as calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus, to formulations, which may reduce the need for additional sources of these minerals. MPCs are multifunctional ingredients and provide benefits, such as water binding, gelling, foaming, emulsification, and heat stability. This article will review the development of MPCs and milk protein isolates including their composition, production, development, functional benefits, and ongoing research. The nutritional and functional attributes of MPCs are discussed in some detail in relation to their application as ingredients in major food categories. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®.


Martin N.,Cornell University | Carey N.,Cornell University | Murphy S.,Cornell University | Kent D.,Cornell University | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Dairy Science | Year: 2016

Fluid milk consumption per capita in the United States has been steadily declining since the 1940s. Many factors have contributed to this decline, including the increasing consumption of carbonated beverages and bottled water. To meet the challenge of stemming the decline in consumption of fluid milk, the dairy industry must take a systematic approach to identifying and correcting for factors that negatively affect consumers' perception of fluid milk quality. To that end, samples of fluid milk were evaluated to identify factors, with a particular focus on light-emitting diode (LED) light exposure, which negatively affect the perceived sensory quality of milk, and to quantify their relative effect on the consumer's experience. Fluid milk samples were sourced from 3 processing facilities with varying microbial postprocessing contamination patterns based on historical testing. The effect of fat content, light exposure, age, and microbiological content were assayed across 23 samples of fluid milk, via consumer, descriptive sensory, and instrumental analyses. Most notably, light exposure resulted in a broad negative reaction from consumers, more so than samples with microbiological contamination exceeding 20,000 cfu/mL on days approaching code. The predominant implication of the study is that a component of paramount importance in ensuring the success of the dairy industry would be to protect fluid milk from all sources of light exposure, from processing plant to consumer. © 2016 American Dairy Science Association.


Trademark
Dairy Management Inc. | Date: 2000-09-05

Printed pamphlets, brochures, informational sheets and manuals about dairy product research and technology developments. Association services, namely, promoting the interests of dairy producers and dairy product producers through the support of research and development of new products and technologies; Providing information about research and development of new products and technologies in the diary industry.

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