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Martin N.,Cornell University | Carey N.,Cornell University | Murphy S.,Cornell University | Kent D.,Cornell University | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Dairy Science | Year: 2016

Fluid milk consumption per capita in the United States has been steadily declining since the 1940s. Many factors have contributed to this decline, including the increasing consumption of carbonated beverages and bottled water. To meet the challenge of stemming the decline in consumption of fluid milk, the dairy industry must take a systematic approach to identifying and correcting for factors that negatively affect consumers' perception of fluid milk quality. To that end, samples of fluid milk were evaluated to identify factors, with a particular focus on light-emitting diode (LED) light exposure, which negatively affect the perceived sensory quality of milk, and to quantify their relative effect on the consumer's experience. Fluid milk samples were sourced from 3 processing facilities with varying microbial postprocessing contamination patterns based on historical testing. The effect of fat content, light exposure, age, and microbiological content were assayed across 23 samples of fluid milk, via consumer, descriptive sensory, and instrumental analyses. Most notably, light exposure resulted in a broad negative reaction from consumers, more so than samples with microbiological contamination exceeding 20,000 cfu/mL on days approaching code. The predominant implication of the study is that a component of paramount importance in ensuring the success of the dairy industry would be to protect fluid milk from all sources of light exposure, from processing plant to consumer. © 2016 American Dairy Science Association.


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Industry publication PR News has named two Blue Chip Worldwide Senior Account Executives, Amy Ferraro and Riva Budowsky, to their PR News Rising PR Stars 30 and Under list for 2016. Budowsky joined Blue Chip in 2013, and has helped develop influencer marketing campaigns on behalf of many of the agency’s larger PR clients, including Fisher Nuts and Orchard Valley Harvest. Budowsky’s efforts include working with Food Network star Chef Alex Guarnaschelli and helping build the brand’s first dedicated influencer ambassador network called the “Fisher Fresh Thinkers.” Ferraro joined Blue Chip in 2014, and was recognized for her innovative work on behalf of Procter and Gamble and Bomb Pop. Notable work includes implementing Bomb Pop’s first-ever tween-focused YouTube marketing campaign, leveraging teen celebrities to breathe new life into the iconic brand, making it relevant again to this emerging target. “We are so proud of the work that both Amy and Riva do for our clients every day,” said Stanton Kawer, Chairman and CEO of Blue Chip Marketing Worldwide. “Their innovative use of social influencers has propelled growth and recognition of our clients and their brands, and we’re pleased that their efforts have been recognized by PR News.” Prior to Blue Chip, Ferraro was at Fishman Public Relations where she performed media relations for Corner Bakery Cafe and Cinnabon. She currently works on Procter and Gamble and PUR accounts. Prior to Blue Chip, Budowsky was at Edelman Public Relations and worked on the National Dairy Council and Dairy Management Inc. accounts. She continues to work on the JBSS brands: Fisher Nuts and Orchard Valley Harvest as well as the Haribo and McCormick brands. Blue Chip's talented PR team assists our clients in a wide array of areas, including strategic counsel, message architecture, media and influencer relations, new product launches, crisis communications, investor relations, media training, and corporate social responsibility. Blue Chip Marketing Worldwide (http://www.bluechipww.com) an independent, united marketing agency. Named to the Crain’s Chicago Business’ Fast Fifty for five consecutive years and recognized as one of the Top 20 best shopper marketing agencies by Hub Magazine in 2015, Blue Chip delivers transformational growth for high-profile clients such as Procter & Gamble, Ricola, Blue Bunny, Fisher Nuts, Enjoy Life Foods and Merck through the creation and execution of innovative, multi-platform marketing campaigns.


Agarwal S.,Dairy Management Inc. | Beausire R.L.W.,KaiNutra LLC | Patel S.,P.A. College | Patel H.,South Dakota State University
Journal of Food Science | Year: 2015

Milk protein concentrates (MPCs) are complete dairy proteins (containing both caseins and whey proteins) that are available in protein concentrations ranging from 42% to 85%. As the protein content of MPCs increases, the lactose levels decrease. MPCs are produced by ultrafiltration or by blending different dairy ingredients. Although ultrafiltration is the preferred method for producing MPCs, they also can be produced by precipitating the proteins out of milk or by dry-blending the milk proteins with other milk components. MPCs are used for their nutritional and functional properties. For example, MPC is high in protein content and averages approximately 365 kcal/100 g. Higher-protein MPCs provide protein enhancement and a clean dairy flavor without adding significant amounts of lactose to food and beverage formulations. MPCs also contribute valuable minerals, such as calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus, to formulations, which may reduce the need for additional sources of these minerals. MPCs are multifunctional ingredients and provide benefits, such as water binding, gelling, foaming, emulsification, and heat stability. This article will review the development of MPCs and milk protein isolates including their composition, production, development, functional benefits, and ongoing research. The nutritional and functional attributes of MPCs are discussed in some detail in relation to their application as ingredients in major food categories. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®.


Quann E.E.,Dairy Management Inc. | Fulgoni V.L.,Nutrition Impact LLC | Auestad N.,Nutrition Insights LLC
South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition | Year: 2016

Background: A large portion of Americans are not meeting the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) for several essential vitamins and minerals due to poor dietary choices. Dairy products are a key source of many of the nutrients that are under consumed, but children and adults do not consume the recommended amounts from this food group. This study modelled the impact of meeting daily recommended amounts of dairy products on population-based nutrient intakes. Methods: Two-day 24-h dietary recalls collected from participants ≥2 years (n = 8944) from the 2007–2010 What We Eat in America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were analysed. Databases available from the WWEIA/NHANES and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) were used to determine nutrient, food group, and dietary supplement intakes. Modelling was performed by adding the necessary number of dairy servings, using the dairy composite designed by USDA, to each participant's diet to meet the dairy recommendations outlined by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. All analyses included sample weights to account for the NHANES survey design. Results: The majority of children 4 years and older (67.4–88.8%) and nearly all adults (99.0–99.6%) fall below the recommended 2.5–3 daily servings of dairy products. Increasing dairy consumption to recommended amounts would result in a significant reduction in the percent of adults with calcium, magnesium, and vitamin A intakes below the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) when considering food intake alone (0–2.0 vs. 9.9–91.1%; 17.3–75.0 vs. 44.7–88.5%; 0.1–15.1 vs. 15.3–48.0%, respectively), as well as food and dietary supplement intake. Minimal, but significant, improvements were observed for the percent of people below the EAR for vitamin D (91.7–99.9 vs. 91.8–99.9%), and little change was achieved for the large percentage of people below the Adequate Intake for potassium. Conclusions: Increasing dairy food consumption to recommended amounts is one practical dietary change that could significantly improve the population's adequacy for certain vitamins and minerals that are currently under-consumed, as well as have a positive impact on health. © Medpharm.


Palacios O.M.,Dairy Management Inc. | Badran J.,North Carolina State University | Spence L.,Dairy Management Inc. | Drake M.A.,North Carolina State University | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Food Science | Year: 2010

Abstract: Appropriate nutrient-dense foods and beverages are crucial for children for proper growth and development and to develop healthful lifelong habits. This study investigated children's (ages 8 to 16 y old) perception of sensory intensity, attribute liking and overall liking of unflavored and chocolate lactose-free cow's milk and soy beverages. Products were not identified as to whether they were soy or milk. Children showed greater acceptance of lactose-free cow's milk compared to milk substitute beverages, within flavor category. No differences in acceptance emerged by ethnic group (Caucasian, African American, Hispanic), but a large difference emerged by age group. All product acceptance differences perceived by older children reoccurred among the younger children and in the same direction, but the older children used a larger range of numbers, especially at the lower end, rather than at the higher end of acceptance. The effect of age is not a simple scaling bias but may suggest a reduced criticism by younger respondents of less-acceptable products.Practical Application: Appropriate nutrient-dense foods and beverages are crucial for children. The prevalence of actual or self-perceived lactose intolerance is a barrier for traditional fluid milk intake. This study evaluated acceptance by children of different ages for lactose free cow's milk and milk substitute soy beverages. While no differences in acceptance emerged by ethnic group (Caucasian, African American, Hispanic), large differences were noted among the age groups. Liking scores for lactose-free cow's milk were higher than scores for milk substitute beverages, when the nature of the product was not identified. Younger children (ages 8 to 12 y old) tend to rate unacceptable products less critically, which means that manufacturers may mistakenly accept a poor tasting product based on these ratings. © 2010 Institute of Food Technologists®.


Quann E.E.,Dairy Management Inc. | Fulgoni V.L.,Nutrition Impact LLC | Auestad N.,Nutrition Insights LLC
Nutrition Journal | Year: 2015

Background: A large portion of Americans are not meeting the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) for several essential vitamins and minerals due to poor dietary choices. Dairy products are a key source of many of the nutrients that are under consumed, but children and adults do not consume the recommended amounts from this food group. This study modeled the impact of meeting daily recommended amounts of dairy products on population-based nutrient intakes. Methods: Two-day 24-h dietary recalls collected from participants ≥2 years (n = 8944) from the 2007-2010 What We Eat in America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were analyzed. Databases available from the WWEIA/NHANES and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) were used to determine nutrient, food group, and dietary supplement intakes. Modeling was performed by adding the necessary number of dairy servings, using the dairy composite designed by USDA, to each participant's diet to meet the dairy recommendations outlined by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. All analyses included sample weights to account for the NHANES survey design. Results: The majority of children 4 years and older (67.4-88.8 %) and nearly all adults (99.0-99.6 %) fall below the recommended 2.5-3 daily servings of dairy products. Increasing dairy consumption to recommended amounts would result in a significant reduction in the percent of adults with calcium, magnesium, and vitamin A intakes below the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) when considering food intake alone (0-2.0 vs. 9.9-91.1 %; 17.3-75.0 vs. 44.7-88.5 %; 0.1-15.1 vs. 15.3-48.0 %, respectively), as well as food and dietary supplement intake. Minimal, but significant, improvements were observed for the percent of people below the EAR for vitamin D (91.7-99.9 vs. 91.8-99.9 %), and little change was achieved for the large percentage of people below the Adequate Intake for potassium. Conclusions: Increasing dairy food consumption to recommended amounts is one practical dietary change that could significantly improve the population's adequacy for certain vitamins and minerals that are currently under-consumed, as well as have a positive impact on health. © 2015 Quann et al.


Trademark
Dairy Management Inc. | Date: 2011-11-15

Downloadable electronic publications in the nature of periodic newsletters providing information and reports on developments in nutrition, products and sustainability in the dairy industry. Non-downloadable electronic publications in the nature of periodic newsletters providing information and reports on developments in nutrition, products and sustainability in the dairy industry.


PubMed | Dairy Management Inc.
Type: | Journal: Journal of food science | Year: 2015

Milk protein concentrates (MPCs) are complete dairy proteins (containing both caseins and whey proteins) that are available in protein concentrations ranging from 42% to 85%. As the protein content of MPCs increases, the lactose levels decrease. MPCs are produced by ultrafiltration or by blending different dairy ingredients. Although ultrafiltration is the preferred method for producing MPCs, they also can be produced by precipitating the proteins out of milk or by dry-blending the milk proteins with other milk components. MPCs are used for their nutritional and functional properties. For example, MPC is high in protein content and averages approximately 365 kcal/100 g. Higher-protein MPCs provide protein enhancement and a clean dairy flavor without adding significant amounts of lactose to food and beverage formulations. MPCs also contribute valuable minerals, such as calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus, to formulations, which may reduce the need for additional sources of these minerals. MPCs are multifunctional ingredients and provide benefits, such as water binding, gelling, foaming, emulsification, and heat stability. This article will review the development of MPCs and milk protein isolates including their composition, production, development, functional benefits, and ongoing research. The nutritional and functional attributes of MPCs are discussed in some detail in relation to their application as ingredients in major food categories.


PubMed | Nutrition Impact LLC, Nutrition Insights LLC and Dairy Management Inc.
Type: | Journal: Nutrition journal | Year: 2015

A large portion of Americans are not meeting the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) for several essential vitamins and minerals due to poor dietary choices. Dairy products are a key source of many of the nutrients that are under consumed, but children and adults do not consume the recommended amounts from this food group. This study modeled the impact of meeting daily recommended amounts of dairy products on population-based nutrient intakes.Two-day 24-h dietary recalls collected from participants 2 years (n = 8944) from the 2007-2010 What We Eat in America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were analyzed. Databases available from the WWEIA/NHANES and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) were used to determine nutrient, food group, and dietary supplement intakes. Modeling was performed by adding the necessary number of dairy servings, using the dairy composite designed by USDA, to each participants diet to meet the dairy recommendations outlined by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. All analyses included sample weights to account for the NHANES survey design.The majority of children 4 years and older (67.4-88.8%) and nearly all adults (99.0-99.6%) fall below the recommended 2.5-3 daily servings of dairy products. Increasing dairy consumption to recommended amounts would result in a significant reduction in the percent of adults with calcium, magnesium, and vitamin A intakes below the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) when considering food intake alone (0-2.0 vs. 9.9-91.1%; 17.3-75.0 vs. 44.7-88.5%; 0.1-15.1 vs. 15.3-48.0%, respectively), as well as food and dietary supplement intake. Minimal, but significant, improvements were observed for the percent of people below the EAR for vitamin D (91.7-99.9 vs. 91.8-99.9%), and little change was achieved for the large percentage of people below the Adequate Intake for potassium.Increasing dairy food consumption to recommended amounts is one practical dietary change that could significantly improve the populations adequacy for certain vitamins and minerals that are currently under-consumed, as well as have a positive impact on health.

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