Dairy Health and Management Services LLC

Lowville, NY, United States

Dairy Health and Management Services LLC

Lowville, NY, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Giordano J.O.,Cornell University | Thomas M.J.,Dairy Health and Management Services LLC | Catucuamba G.,Dairy Health and Management Services LLC | Curler M.D.,Dairy Health and Management Services LLC | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Dairy Science | Year: 2016

The specific objective of this study was to determine if increasing the interval between the Presynch and Ovsynch portion of the Presynch-Ovsynch protocol (Presynch: PGF2α-14 d-PGF2α and Ovsynch: GnRH-7 d-PGF2α-56 h-GnRH-16-20 h-timed artificial insemination) from 12 to 14 d would reduce the fertility of lactating dairy cows not detected in estrus after Presynch that receive timed artificial insemination (TAI). Cows from 4 commercial dairy farms (n=3,165) were blocked by parity (primiparous vs. multiparous) and randomly assigned to a 12 (PSOv14-12; n=1,566) or 14 d (PSOv14-14; n=1,599) interval between the second PGF2α (PGF) injection of Presynch (P2) and the beginning of Ovsynch. Cows detected in estrus any time between P2 and the day of the TAI were inseminated (AIED group). From a subgroup of cows (177 and 150 in PSOv14-12 and PSOv14-14, respectively), ovarian parameters and ovulation were evaluated through determination of concentrations of progesterone (P4) in blood and transrectal ultrasonography at the time of the first GnRH (GnRH1) and the PGF injection of Ovsynch. Overall, 52.8% (n=1,671) of the cows were AIED, whereas 47.2% (n=1,494) received TAI. For cows that received TAI, pregnancies per artificial insemination 39 d after artificial insemination were similar for PSOv14-12 (36.3%) and PSOv14-14 (36.0%) but were greater for primiparous (41.5%) than multiparous cows (33.6%). Pregnancy loss from 39 to 105 d after artificial insemination was similar for PSOv14-12 (4.8%) and PSOv14-14 (8.6%), for primiparous (6.4%) and multiparous cows (7.0%), but a tendency for a treatment by parity interaction was observed. Both treatments had a similar proportion of cows with a follicle ≥10mm and similar follicle size at GnRH1; however, the ovulatory response to GnRH was greater for PSOv14-12 (62.2%) than PSOv14-14 (46.4%). A greater proportion of cows with a functional corpus luteum (75.3 vs. 65.6%) and greater concentrations of P4 (3.9 vs. 3.3 ng/mL) at GnRH1 in PSOv14-14 than PSOv14-12 may have compensated for the reduction in fertility expected due to reduced ovulatory response to GnRH1. We concluded that extending the interval from Presynch to Ovsynch from 12 to 14 reduced ovulatory response to GnRH1 but did not reduce the fertility of cows that received TAI when cows were inseminated in estrus after presynchronization. Thus, farms that combine AIED and TAI during the Presynch-Ovsynch protocol may use a 14-d interval between Presynch and Ovsynch to simplify their management without reducing fertility of cows receiving TAI. © 2016 American Dairy Science Association.


Giordano J.O.,Cornell University | Thomas M.J.,Dairy Health and Management Services LLC | Catucuamba G.,Dairy Health and Management Services LLC | Curler M.D.,Dairy Health and Management Services LLC | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Dairy Science | Year: 2016

The objective was to compare the reproductive performance of lactating Holstein cows managed with a strategy that included the Ovsynch protocol with exogenous progesterone (P4) supplementation or presynchronization with GnRH 7 d before Ovsynch to treat cows without a corpus luteum (CL), a CL <15 mm, or cystic at the time of the PGF2α injection of Resynch (GnRH-7 d-PGF2α-56 h-GnRH-16 to 20 h-TAI). In a preliminary study, blood collection and transrectal ovarian ultrasonography were conducted (n = 555) at the PGF2α of Resynch [coincident with nonpregnancy diagnosis (NPD)] to define a cutoff value for CL size that better predicted fertility after timed artificial insemination (TAI). A CL size of 15 mm was selected based on statistical differences in pregnancies per AI (P/AI) [33.2 vs. 10.3 P/AI for CL ≥15 mm (n = 497) vs. no CL ≥15 mm (n = 58; no CL, CL <15 mm, or cystic)]. Subsequently, in a completely randomized experiment, cows were enrolled in a management strategy that used Ovsynch with P4 supplementation [Ovsynch+P4; GnRH and controlled internal drug release device (CIDR)-7 d-PGF2α and CIDR removal-56 h-GnRH-16 to 20 h-TAI] or a PreG-Ovsynch protocol [PreG-Ovsynch; GnRH-7 d-GnRH-7 d-PGF2α-56 h-GnRH-16 to 20 h-TAI] to treat cows without a CL, a CL <15 mm, or cystic at NPD and the PGF2α of Resynch. Cows with a CL ≥15 mm at the PGF2α of Resynch completed the protocol and received TAI. Data were available from 212, 192, and 1,797 AI services after Ovsynch+P4, PreG-Ovsynch, and Resynch, respectively. At 39 d after AI, P/AI tended to be greater for Ovsynch+P4 and PreG-Ovsynch combined (35.1%) than for Resynch cows (31.1%), whereas P/AI were similar for Ovsynch+P4 (34.4%) and PreG-Ovsynch (35.9%). The hazard of pregnancy for cows that received the experimental treatments at least once was similar for cows in the Ovsynch+P4 (n = 124) and the PreG-Ovsynch (n = 132) group (hazard ratio 1.15; 95% confidence interval: 0.87 to 1.53). Median days to pregnancy were 52 and 59 for cows in the Ovsynch+P4 and the PreG-Ovsynch groups, respectively. The presynchronizing GnRH injection of PreG-Ovsynch induced ovulation in 86.0% of the cows. At the first GnRH of Ovsynch, the proportion of cows with a CL based on ultrasound (86.6 vs. 15.0%), P4 >1 ng/mL (82.8 vs. 31.8%), a follicle ≥10 mm (98.0 vs. 84.4%), and P4 concentrations (3.7 vs. 1.1 ng/mL) was greater in PreG-Ovsynch than in Ovsynch+P4. Conversely, more cows ovulated in response to the first GnRH of Ovsynch in Ovsynch+P4 (71.9%) than PreG-Ovsynch (58.3%). At the PGF2α before TAI, more cows had a CL based on ultrasound (92.1 vs. 77.0%) and P4 concentrations were greater in PreG-Ovsynch than in Ovsynch+P4 (4.1 vs. 2.6 ng/mL); however, a similar proportion of cows had P4 >1 ng/mL (79.1 vs. 82.7%). We conclude that the Ovsynch+P4 and PreG-Ovsynch treatments for cows without a CL, a CL <15 mm, or cystic at the PGF2α injection of Resynch led to P/AI similar to that of cows with a CL ≥15 mm, and that both management strategies resulted in similar time to pregnancy. © 2016 American Dairy Science Association.


PubMed | Dairy Health and Management Services LLC and Cornell University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of dairy science | Year: 2015

The specific objective of this study was to determine if increasing the interval between the Presynch and Ovsynch portion of the Presynch-Ovsynch protocol (Presynch: PGF2-14 d-PGF2 and Ovsynch: GnRH-7 d-PGF2-56 h-GnRH-16-20 h-timed artificial insemination) from 12 to 14 d would reduce the fertility of lactating dairy cows not detected in estrus after Presynch that receive timed artificial insemination (TAI). Cows from 4 commercial dairy farms (n=3,165) were blocked by parity (primiparous vs. multiparous) and randomly assigned to a 12 (PSOv14-12; n=1,566) or 14 d (PSOv14-14; n=1,599) interval between the second PGF2 (PGF) injection of Presynch (P2) and the beginning of Ovsynch. Cows detected in estrus any time between P2 and the day of the TAI were inseminated (AIED group). From a subgroup of cows (177 and 150 in PSOv14-12 and PSOv14-14, respectively), ovarian parameters and ovulation were evaluated through determination of concentrations of progesterone (P4) in blood and transrectal ultrasonography at the time of the first GnRH (GnRH1) and the PGF injection of Ovsynch. Overall, 52.8% (n=1,671) of the cows were AIED, whereas 47.2% (n=1,494) received TAI. For cows that received TAI, pregnancies per artificial insemination 39 d after artificial insemination were similar for PSOv14-12 (36.3%) and PSOv14-14 (36.0%) but were greater for primiparous (41.5%) than multiparous cows (33.6%). Pregnancy loss from 39 to 105 d after artificial insemination was similar for PSOv14-12 (4.8%) and PSOv14-14 (8.6%), for primiparous (6.4%) and multiparous cows (7.0%), but a tendency for a treatment by parity interaction was observed. Both treatments had a similar proportion of cows with a follicle 10 mm and similar follicle size at GnRH1; however, the ovulatory response to GnRH was greater for PSOv14-12 (62.2%) than PSOv14-14 (46.4%). A greater proportion of cows with a functional corpus luteum (75.3 vs. 65.6%) and greater concentrations of P4 (3.9 vs. 3.3 ng/mL) at GnRH1 in PSOv14-14 than PSOv14-12 may have compensated for the reduction in fertility expected due to reduced ovulatory response to GnRH1. We concluded that extending the interval from Presynch to Ovsynch from 12 to 14 reduced ovulatory response to GnRH1 but did not reduce the fertility of cows that received TAI when cows were inseminated in estrus after presynchronization. Thus, farms that combine AIED and TAI during the Presynch-Ovsynch protocol may use a 14-d interval between Presynch and Ovsynch to simplify their management without reducing fertility of cows receiving TAI.


PubMed | Dairy Health and Management Services LLC and Cornell University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of dairy science | Year: 2016

The objective was to compare the reproductive performance of lactating Holstein cows managed with a strategy that included the Ovsynch protocol with exogenous progesterone (P4) supplementation or presynchronization with GnRH 7d before Ovsynch to treat cows without a corpus luteum (CL), a CL <15 mm, or cystic at the time of the PGF2 injection of Resynch (GnRH-7 d-PGF2-56 h-GnRH-16 to 20 h-TAI). In a preliminary study, blood collection and transrectal ovarian ultrasonography were conducted (n=555) at the PGF2 of Resynch [coincident with nonpregnancy diagnosis (NPD)] to define a cutoff value for CL size that better predicted fertility after timed artificial insemination (TAI). A CL size of 15 mm was selected based on statistical differences in pregnancies per AI (P/AI) [33.2 vs. 10.3 P/AI for CL 15 mm (n=497) vs. no CL 15 mm (n=58; no CL, CL <15 mm, or cystic)]. Subsequently, in a completely randomized experiment, cows were enrolled in a management strategy that used Ovsynch with P4 supplementation [Ovsynch+P4; GnRH and controlled internal drug release device (CIDR)-7 d-PGF2 and CIDR removal-56 h-GnRH-16 to 20 h-TAI] or a PreG-Ovsynch protocol [PreG-Ovsynch; GnRH-7 d-GnRH-7 d-PGF2-56 h-GnRH-16 to 20 h-TAI] to treat cows without a CL, a CL <15 mm, or cystic at NPD and the PGF2 of Resynch. Cows with a CL 15 mm at the PGF2 of Resynch completed the protocol and received TAI. Data were available from 212, 192, and 1,797 AI services after Ovsynch+P4, PreG-Ovsynch, and Resynch, respectively. At 39d after AI, P/AI tended to be greater for Ovsynch+P4 and PreG-Ovsynch combined (35.1%) than for Resynch cows (31.1%), whereas P/AI were similar for Ovsynch+P4 (34.4%) and PreG-Ovsynch (35.9%). The hazard of pregnancy for cows that received the experimental treatments at least once was similar for cows in the Ovsynch+P4 (n=124) and the PreG-Ovsynch (n=132) group (hazard ratio 1.15; 95% confidence interval: 0.87 to 1.53). Median days to pregnancy were 52 and 59 for cows in the Ovsynch+P4 and the PreG-Ovsynch groups, respectively. The presynchronizing GnRH injection of PreG-Ovsynch induced ovulation in 86.0% of the cows. At the first GnRH of Ovsynch, the proportion of cows with a CL based on ultrasound (86.6 vs. 15.0%), P4 >1 ng/mL (82.8 vs. 31.8%), a follicle 10 mm (98.0 vs. 84.4%), and P4 concentrations (3.7 vs. 1.1 ng/mL) was greater in PreG-Ovsynch than in Ovsynch+P4. Conversely, more cows ovulated in response to the first GnRH of Ovsynch in Ovsynch+P4 (71.9%) than PreG-Ovsynch (58.3%). At the PGF2 before TAI, more cows had a CL based on ultrasound (92.1 vs. 77.0%) and P4 concentrations were greater in PreG-Ovsynch than in Ovsynch+P4 (4.1 vs. 2.6 ng/mL); however, a similar proportion of cows had P4 >1 ng/mL (79.1 vs. 82.7%). We conclude that the Ovsynch+P4 and PreG-Ovsynch treatments for cows without a CL, a CL <15 mm, or cystic at the PGF2 injection of Resynch led to P/AI similar to that of cows with a CL 15 mm, and that both management strategies resulted in similar time to pregnancy.

Loading Dairy Health and Management Services LLC collaborators
Loading Dairy Health and Management Services LLC collaborators