Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Louey, France

Perret A.,DAHER SOCATA | Perret A.,National Engineering School of Tarbes | Mistou S.,National Engineering School of Tarbes | Fazzini M.,National Engineering School of Tarbes | Brault R.,National Engineering School of Tarbes
Composite Structures | Year: 2012

The present study analyses an aircraft composite fuselage structure manufactured by the Liquid Resin Infusion (LRI) process and subjected to a compressive load. LRI is based on the moulding of high performance composite parts by infusing liquid resin on dry fibres instead of prepreg fabrics or Resin Transfer Moulding (RTM). Actual industrial projects face composite integrated structure issues as a number of structures (stiffeners, ...) are more and more integrated onto the skins of aircraft fuselage.A post-buckling test of a composite fuselage representative panel is set up, from numerical results available in previous works. Two stereo Digital Image Correlation (DIC) systems are positioned on each side of the panel, that are aimed at correlating numerical and experimental out-of-plane displacements (corresponding to the skin local buckling displacements of the panel). First, the experimental approach and the test facility are presented. A post-mortem failure analysis is then performed with the help of Non-Destructive Techniques (NDT). X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) measurements and ultrasonic testing (US) techniques are able to explain the failure mechanisms that occured during this post-buckling test. Numerical results are validated by the experimental results. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Perret A.,DAHER SOCATA | Perret A.,National Engineering School of Tarbes | Mistou S.,National Engineering School of Tarbes | Fazzini M.,National Engineering School of Tarbes
Annales de Chimie: Science des Materiaux | Year: 2012

This study is focused on a composite stiffened panel, representative of an aircraft fuselage. This panel is manufactured by LRI (Liquid Resin Infusion), and structures are integrated in two directions at the very soon steps of the process. Finite element models have been developed to set up a post-buckling test. This post-buckling test checks the load and shortening at failure. Stereo-correlation measurement systems are used to compare experimental and numerical through thickness displacements. Decohesion mechanisms are also highlighted along a global scale in the skin-stiffener area. © 2012 Lavoisier. Source


Garnier C.,DAHER SOCATA | Garnier C.,Toulouse 1 University Capitole | Lorrain B.,Toulouse 1 University Capitole
EPJ Web of Conferences | Year: 2010

This study deals with cumulative damage and its evolution in already impact damage composite structure. In order to follow the growing damage and to compare it with cumulative model, tests are monitored with an InfraRed thermography system. A carbon-epoxy composite is first low-energy impacted and then fatigued under tensioncompression loading. This study also enables a very fast analysis of predicting the damage evolution coupling InfraRed Thermography as NDT method and InfraRed thermography as a following system. © 2010 Owned by the authors, published by EDP Sciences. Source


Perret A.,DAHER SOCATA | Perret A.,National Engineering School of Tarbes | Mistou S.,National Engineering School of Tarbes | Denaud L.-E.,National Engineering School of Tarbes | And 3 more authors.
Applied Mechanics and Materials | Year: 2011

FUSCOMP (FUSelage COMPosite) is a Research & Development program which has received the label from the Aerospace Valley competitiveness cluster. It will lead to a test of a composite fuselage demonstrator manufactured by the Liquid Resin Infusion (LRI) process. LRI is based on the moulding of high performance composite parts by infusing liquid resin on dry fibers instead of prepreg fabrics. The study of this proof of concept is based on the TBM 850 airframe, a pressurized business turboprop aircraft currently produced by DAHER-SOCATA. Technical achievements will concern numerical methods and finite elements analysis to be used for the modelling of this aircraft composite fuselage structure. Actual industrial projects face composite integrated structure issues as a number of structures (stiffeners,...) are more and more integrated onto the skins of aircraft fuselage. Indeed the main benefit of LRI is to reduce assembly steps which lead to cycle time gain and thus cost reduction. In particular, infusing components and sub-components at the same time avoids riveting parts altogether. However it is necessary to validate the dimensioning of the studied composite structure. © (2011) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland. Source

Discover hidden collaborations