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Kim K.-S.,Kyungpook National University | Hong J.-H.,Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology | Kim D.-I.,Daegu Technopark Bio Health Convergence Center
Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition | Year: 2012

This study was designed to evaluate the anti-metabolic syndrome effects of capsule-filled cheonggukjang (CGJ) added with arrowroot (Pueraria thunbergiana) extracts on body weight, adiposity and lipid metabolism in ob/ob mice. Experimental groups were normal control group (NC: basal diet), positive control group (PC: 2% CGJ), CGJ added with arrowroot extracts group (AR: 2% arrowroot in CGJ), and capsule-filled CGJ added with arrowroot extracts group (ARC: 2% arrowroot CGJ capsule). Each group was fed experimental diet for 10 weeks. Final body weight gain and atherogenic index were significantly lower in the ARC than NC group. Serum levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides, blood glucose and atherogenic index were significantly lower in the ARC than NC group. Furthermore, fatty liver and regional lipid accumultion in ob/ob mice were inhibited in the ARC group. The hepatic activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione S-transferase were significantly higher in the ARC than NC group. Therefore, the anti-matabolic syndrome effects of the ARC group were higher than the AR group. In conclusion, these results indicated that CGJ added with arrowroot mediates its anti-obesity effects in ob/obmice by improving lipid metabolism and antioxidant enzyme. Source


Kim K.-S.,Kyungpook National University | Kim D.-I.,Daegu Technopark Bio Health Convergence Center | Lim A.-K.,Daegu Technopark Bio Health Convergence Center | Yoon S.-R.,Daegu Technopark Bio Health Convergence Center | And 2 more authors.
Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition | Year: 2011

We investigated the anti-diabetic effects of Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus (sea urchin, SU) shells on non-obese type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats. We measured body weight, blood glucose, and plasma insulin levels and conducted an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The SU shells (100 and 200 mg/kg) significantly reduced the blood glucose of GK rats from 203.8±29.8 mg/dL to 138.5±21.2 mg/dL at after 4 weeks of daily oral administration. However, plasma insulin levels at the same time were not changed by treatment with SU. During the OGTT, the SU-treated GK rats maintained a lower blood glucose level than the control group for 15 to 120 min. Based on these results, SU shells are considered to be effective in improving glucose tolerance. These results suggest that SU shells have unique properties to lower blood glucose, raise insulin sensitivity, and improve insulin resistance in GK rats. Source

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